Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Mount Vernon (Virginia, United States) or search for Mount Vernon (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pine, Robert edge 1730-1788 (search)
Pine, Robert edge 1730-1788 Painter; born in London, England, in 1730 or 1742; gained considerable reputation in England before he came to America at the close of the Revolution. In Philadelphia he exhibited the first cast of the Venus de'medici ever seen in America. He was befriended by Francis Hopkinson, and painted from life, at Mount Vernon, a portrait of Washington. He also painted portraits of other worthies of the period of the Revolution. He died in Philadelphia, Pa., Nov. 19, 1788.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Princeton, the (search)
Princeton, the On Feb. 28, 1845, President Tyler lost two of his most trusted cabinet ministers by an accident. The President and all his cabinet, many members of Congress, and other distinguished citizens, with several ladies, were on board the United States steam ship-of-war Princeton, on a trial-trip down the Potomac from Washington. When they were opposite Mount Vernon one of the largest guns of the Princeton, in firing a salute, burst, scattering its deadly fragments around. The Secretary of State, Abel P. Upshur, and Secretary of the Navy, T. W. Gilmer, and David Gardiner, of New York, were killed. No one else was seriously injured.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Randolph, Edmund (Jennings) 1753-1813 (search)
s serving, was intercepted on its way to France by a British cruiser, and, through Lord Grenville, was transmitted to Mr. Hammond, the British minister at Philadelphia. That functionary, ascribing the delay in ratifying Jay's treaty to Randolph, communicated Fouchet's despatch to Wolcott, as going to show what intrigues the Secretary of State had carried on with the late French minister. Wolcott consulted with other friends of the government, and a message was sent to the President, at Mount Vernon, requesting his immediate return to Philadelphia. On his arrival the despatch was presented to him (Aug. 12, 1795). A cabinet council was held the next day, when the question was propounded. What shall be done with the treaty? Randolph opposed the ratification vehemently. The other members were in favor of it, and on Aug. 18 the President signed it. When copies of the treaty had been signed by Randolph as Secretary of State, Washington presented to him the intercepted despatch of Fo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Revolutionary War, (search)
ng Island and Staten Island (withdrawing their last armed man sent for the purpose of reducing the colonies to subjection) Dec. 4, 1783 Washington resigns his commission as commander-in-chief at the State-house, Annapolis, Md., and retires to Mount Vernon Dec. 23, 1783 Congress ratifies the definitive treaty of peace Jan. 14, 1784 Sketches and portraits of all the important participants, and details of all noteworthy events in the war, will be found under their own or readily suggestive titnward march of the allies. They made their way to Annapolis, and thence by water to the James River in transports furnished by De Barras. From Baltimore Washington, accompanied by Rochambeau and the Marquis de Chastellux, visited his home at Mount Vernon, from which he had been absent since June, 1775. There they remained two days, and then journeyed to Williamsburg, where they arrived on the 14th. There the allies rendezvoused, and prepared for the siege of Yorktown. The defeat of Cornwa
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
General Washington bids farewell to his officers at Fraunce's Tavern, corner Pearl and Broad streets, New York City......Dec. 4, 1783 Washington resigns his commission as commander-in-chief at the State-house, Annapolis, Md., and retires to Mount Vernon......Dec. 23, 1783 Congress ratifies the definitive treaty of peace......Jan. 14, 1784 Congress accepts cession of Northwest Territory by Virginia; deeds signed by Virginia delegates......March 1, 1784 American daily Advertiser, firsta of Judah P. Benjamin, of Louisiana, in the Senate for the right of secession......Jan. 2, 1861 Fort Pulaski, at the mouth of the Savannah River, Ga., seized by Georgia State troops......Jan. 3, 1861 United States arsenal seized at Mount Vernon, Ala., by the Alabama State troops......Jan. 4, 1861 Forts Morgan and Gaines, at the entrance of Mobile Bay, seized by the Alabama State troops......Jan. 5, 1861 Fernando Wood, mayor of New York, recommends secession to the common council..
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Virginia, (search)
2 George Washington, born at Westmoreland county......Feb. 22, 1732 Patrick Henry, born at Studley, Hanover county......May 29, 1736 First newspaper in Virginia, the Virginia Gazette, published by William Parks, appears at Williamsburg......August, 1736 Richmond settled by William Byrd......1739 Virginia raises a regiment to assist in the reduction of Carthagena, West Indies. Lawrence Washington, half-brother of George Washington, is a captain in it, embarking......1740 Mount Vernon, named by Lawrence Washington after Admiral Vernon, who commanded the fleet against Carthagena......1740 George Whitefield comes to Virginia......1740 Richmond incorporated......1742 Augustine Washington, father of George Washington, dies......April, 1743 Thomas Jefferson born in Albemarle county......April 2, 1743 Dr. Thomas Walker, of the council of Virginia, crosses and names the Cumberland Mountains......1747 Harper's Ferry, named after Robert Harper, an English mill
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washington, George (search)
. His brother soon afterwards died, and by his will George became heir to the fine estate of Mount Vernon. In 1753 he was sent on a delicate mission, by the governor of Virginia, to the commander seven he married the young widow Custis (Washington, Martha), and they took up their abode at Mount Vernon, where he pursued the business of a farmer until 1774, when he was chosen to a seat in the Vihis commission into the hands of Congress, who gave it to him, and retired to private life at Mount Vernon, at the close of 1783. During all the national perplexities after the return of peace, incited reproach upon his intentions or his judgment. In the enjoyment of domestic happiness at Mount Vernon, for about three years, he was regarded more and more as the great and good man. Suddenly, ofessors of Christianity in the church with that road to heaven which to them shall seem the Mount Vernon in Washington's day. most direct, plainest, easiest, and least liable to exception. Again,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washington, Lawrence 1718- (search)
shington. of both Wentworth and Vernon. Lawrence intended to go to England and join the regular army, but, falling in love with the beautiful Anne Fairfax, they were married in July, 1743. He took possession of his fine estate, and named it Mount Vernon, in honor of the gallant admiral. Little George was a frequent and muchpetted visitor at Mount Vernon. In 1751, when George was nineteen years of age, his brother felt compelled to go to Barbadoes in search of a renovation of his health. Geof the gallant admiral. Little George was a frequent and muchpetted visitor at Mount Vernon. In 1751, when George was nineteen years of age, his brother felt compelled to go to Barbadoes in search of a renovation of his health. George went with him. But consumption was wasting the life of Lawrence, and he returned home in May, 1752, to die in July following. By a provision of his will, his half-brother George became the owner of the Mount Vernon estate and other property valued at $200,000.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washington, Martha 1732-1781 (search)
ton in January, 1759. Soon after their marriage they took up their abode at Mount Vernon, on the Potomac. She was a very beautiful woman, a little below the medium hold of the great patriot, the numerous distinguished guests who thronged to Mount Vernon. One of her two children died just as she was blossoming into womanhood; theffection for her husband; and another, because of apprehensions of danger at Mount Vernon on account of the operations of Lord Dunmore. She remained in Cambridge SMrs. Washington, as the wife of the first President, when she journeyed from Mount Vernon to New York to join her husband there after the inauguration. She left MounMount Vernon in her chaise on May 19, 1789, with her two grandchildren, George Washington Parke and Eleanor Parke Custis. She was clothed tidily in American textile macans who viewed the pageantry with suspicion, believing that they saw in this a foreshowing of monarchical ceremonies. She died at Mount Vernon, Va., in May, 1802.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washingtoniana. -1857 (search)
n illustrious, and that He will give you that reward which the world cannot give. Washington and his wife set out for Mount Vernon on the day before Christmas, where he was welcomed back to private life by the greetings of his family and flocks of cnd chose the President and Vice-President. His election was announced to him by Charles Thomson, who had been sent to Mount Vernon for the purpose, with a letter from John Langdon, pro tempore president of the Senate. Thomson arrived on April 14, hem and the Revolutionists was announced. When the news of this event and the conduct of Genet reached Washington, at Mount Vernon, his mind was filled with anxiety. By the treaty of commerce, French privateers were entitled to a shelter in Americaings of trifling value, were the drafts of letters to Mrs. Washington, her son (John Parke Custis), and his manager at Mount Vernon, Lund Washington, and that these had been transmitted to England by an officer into whose hands they had fallen. This
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