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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Defence of Fort Gregg. (search)
After the fall of this battery, the rest of my command along the new line was attacked in front and flank and driven back to the old line of works running northwest from Battery 45, where it remained until the evacuation of Petersburg. We were here rejoined by the Twenty-eighth, under Captain Linebarger. On the afternoon of the 3d, we crossed the Appomattox at Goode's bridge, bivouaced at Amelia Courthouse on the 4th, and on the 5th formed line of battle between Amelia Courthouse and Jetersville, where our sharpshooters, under Major Wooten, became engaged. Next day, while resting in Farmville, we were ordered back to a fortified hill to support our cavalry, which was hard pressed, but before reaching the hill the order was countermanded. We moved rapidly through Farmville, and sustained some loss from the artillery fire while crossing the river near that place. That afternoon we formed line of battle, facing to the rear, between one and two miles from Farmville, and my sharpsh
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade. (search)
After the fall of this battery, the rest of my command along the new line, was attacked in front and flank, and driven back to the old line of works running northwest from Battery 45, where it remained until the evacuation of Petersburg. We were here rejoined by the Twenty-Eighth, under Captain Linebarger. On the afternoon of the 3d we crossed the Appomattox at Goode's bridge, bivouaced at Amelia Courthouse on the 4th, and on the 5th formed line of battle between Amelia Courthouse and Jetersville, where our sharp-shooters, under Major Wooten, became engaged. Next day, while resting in Farmville, we were ordered back to a fortified hill to support our cavalry, which was hard pressed, but before reaching the hill the order was countermanded, we were moved rapidly through Farmville, and sustained some loss from the artillery while crossing the river near that place. That afternoon we formed line of battle, facing to the rear, between one and two miles from Farmville, and my sharp-s
be seen that General Grant, starting from the south side of the Appomattox, had a shorter line to Danville than that which General Lee must necessarily follow, and, if Grant directed his march so as to put his forces between Danville and those of Lee, it was quite possible for him to effect it. This was done, and thus Lee was prevented from carrying out his original purpose, and directed his march toward Lynchburg. The enemy, having first placed himself across the route to Danville, at Jetersville, subsequently took up the line of Lee's retreat. His large force of cavalry, and the exhausted condition of the horses of our small number of that arm, gave the pursuing foe a very great advantage; worn and reduced in numbers as Lee's army was, however, the spirit it had always shown flashed out whenever it was pressed. A division would turn upon a corps and drive it; General Fitzhugh Lee, the worthy successor of the immortal Stuart, with a brigade of our emaciated cavalry, would drive
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
H. The next morning we passed through the village, where we should have gotten rations, but they did not meet us. They had gone on to Richmond and been destroyed there, as has been told. Here a few of the best-equipped battalions of artillery were selected to accompany the troops, while all the excess was turned over to Walker, chief of the 3d corps artillery, to take on a direct road to Lynchburg. About 1 P. M., with Lee and Longstreet at the head of the column, we took the road for Jetersville, where it was reported that Sheridan was across our path and Lee intended to attack him. We were not long in coming to where our skirmish line was already engaged, and a long conference took place between the generals and W. H. F. Lee in command of the cavalry. It appeared that the 2d and 6th corps were in front of us, but might be passed in the night by a flank march. We countermarched a short distance, and then turning to the right, we marched all night, passing Amelia Springs, and ar
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lee, Robert Edward 1807- (search)
rmy to forage for supplies to keep his forces from starving. Grant, meanwhile, bad taken possession of Petersburg, and his army moved in vigorous pursuit. Sheridan's cavalry and Warren's corps struck the Danville Railway (April 4, 1865) at Jetersville, 7 miles southwest of Amelia Court-house. Some of his cavalry then pushed on to Burkesville Station, at the junction of that road with the Southside Railway. Sheridan now stood squarely across Lee's pathway of retreat, and held possession oive guns, and destroyed the wagons. Lee's accompanying infantry had pressed Davies for a while, but, reinforced by Generals Gregg and Smith, he extricated himself. On the morning of the 6th nearly the whole of the Army of the Potomac were at Jetersville, and moved upon Amelia Court-house. Sheridan discovered Lee's army moving rapidly westward, and made a rapid pursuit, in three columns. Great efforts were made to check Lee's retreat. He was smitten severely at Sailor's Creek, a small tribu
able to judge when you receive this. Rebel armies now are the only strategic points to strike at. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General. Major-General W. T. Sherman. On the morning of the sixth it was found that General Lee was moving west of Jetersville, toward Danville. General Sheridan moved with his cavalry (the Fifth corps having been returned to General Meade on his reaching Jetersville), to strike his flank, followed by the Sixth corps, while the Second and Fifth corps pressed hard aftJetersville), to strike his flank, followed by the Sixth corps, while the Second and Fifth corps pressed hard after, forcing him to abandon several hundred wagons and several pieces of artillery. General Ord advanced from Burkesville toward Farmville, sending two regiments of infantry, and a squadron of cavalry, under Brevet Brigadier-General Theodore Read, to reach and destroy the bridges. This advance met the head of Lee's column near Farmville, which it heroically attacked and detained until General Read was killed and his small force overpowered. This caused a delay in the enemy's movements, and en
the march by the troops of the Second and Sixth corps, reaching Jetersville between four and five P. M., where the Fifth corps was found inteneral Crook was ordered to strike the Danville railroad between Jetersville and Burke's station, and then move up toward Jetersville. The FJetersville. The Fifth corps moved rapidly to that point, as I had learned from my scouts that the enemy was at Amelia Court-house, and everything indicated that they were collecting at that point. On arriving at Jetersville, about five o'clock P. M., I learned without doubt that Lee and his army wth corps was at once ordered to intrench, with a view to holding Jetersville until the main army could come up. It seems to me that this was ring the afternoon, and after the arrival of the Second corps at Jetersville, which General Meade requested me to put in position,he being ill, the enemy demonstrated strongly in front of Jetersville against Smith's and Gregg's brigades of Crook's division of cavalry, but no seriou
uld have to break up half of it into foraging parties to get food; the country was scant of subsistence, a tract of straggling woods and pine barrens; and soon the pangs of hunger would tell upon the flagging spirits of his men, and consume the last hope. Meanwhile the forced delay of his army at Amelia Court-house gave Sheridan, who was pursuing with his cavalry, and the Fifth corps, time to strike in upon the Confederate line of retreat. In the afternoon of the 4th he was reported at Jetersville, on the Danville Railroad, seven miles south west of Amelia Court-house. But it was no longer a question of battle with Gen. Lee; the concern was now simply to escape. His men were suffering from hunger; half of them had been sent or had straggled in quest of food; soldiers who had to assuage their craving by plucking the buds and twigs of trees, were scarcely to be blamed for courting capture; and thus with his army in loose order, in woful plight, diminishing at every step, Gen. Lee d
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 13 (search)
mainder of the army, time to strike in upon the Confederate line of retreat. This he did the afternoon of the 4th, at Jetersville, on the Danville Railroad, seven miles southwest of Amelia Courthouse. Thus headed off from the direct line of rets. But it is not clear what this distinguished officer means by a comparatively small force. Sheridan had with him at Jetersville above eighteen thousand excellent cavalry and infantry, well intrenched; while he himself reported Lee's entire strenghe afternoon of the 5th, General Meade, with the Second and Sixth corps of the Army of the Potomac, joined Sheridan at Jetersville, where, expecting attack, he had held his force intrenched since the previous day. Lee was still at Amelia Courthouse.erefore, on the morning of the 6th, the whole Army of the Potomac, which, the night previous, had been concentrated at Jetersville, moved northward towards Amelia to give battle to the Confederates, it was found that Lee had slipped past. The direc
. 1. James River, Va. Naval expedition; account; from Philadelphia Enquirer. Boston Evening Journal, Feb. 5, 1864, p. 2, col. 1; Feb. 9, p. 2, col. 4. Jarvis, Edward. Sanitary condition of the army. Atlantic, vol. 10, p. 463. Jetersville, Va. In Cavalry of the army of the Potomac. Col. Hampton S. Thomas. United Service Mag., new ser., vol. 1, p. 1. John Brown song, origin of; from Boston Transcript. American Hist. Rec., vol. 3, p. 479. Johns, ´╝łGen.) Col. Thomas . Army and Navy Journal, vol. 2, pp. 570, 580. Thirty-third Regt. U. S. C. T. Short notice of. Col. Thos. W. Higginson. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 3, p. 311. Thomas, col. Hampton S. Cavalry of the army of the Potomac; Five Forks, Jetersville, Reams' Sta., etc. United Service Mag., new ser., vol. 1, p. 1. Thomas, Henry Goddard. Colored troops at Petersburg, Century, vol. 34, p. 777. Tioga, U. S. steamer, arrives from Key West with yellow fever; list of deaths July 9, 1864.
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