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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), William iii. (William Henry, Prince of Orange) 1650-1702 (search)
William iii. (William Henry, Prince of Orange) 1650-1702 King of England and Stadtholder of Holland; born in The Hague, Nov. 4, 1650; was a nephew of Charles II. and James II., and married his cousin Mary, daughter of James. The union was popular in both countries. The Prince, a member of whose house (of Orange) had freed his country from the Spanish yoke, was regarded as the head of the Protestant party in Europe, and his wife expected to succeed to the English throne. His policy always was to lessen the power of France, whose monarch, Louis XIV., was regarded as the most powerful enemy of Protestantism in Europe. The policy of James on the throne was to increase the papal power, and a breach between the King and his Dutch son-in-law was inevitable. The people of England finally rose in their might and invited William to invade the country. It was done in 1688. He and his wife were made joint monarchs of England in February, 1689, by a William iii., Prince of Orange.
light upon it are conveyed along the opticnerve to the brain. With felicity he explains that we see single when we use both eyes, because of the formation of the visual images on symmetrical portions of the two retinas. — Draper. The camera-obscura of Leonardo da Vinci, b. 1452, was an imitation of the mechanical structure of the eye. Samuel Pepys, in His Diary, records a conversation with Dr. Scarborough on board the Charles, formerly the Nazeby, on the voyage of Charles II. from the Hague to Dover, May 24, 1660. Dr. Scarborough remarked that custom taught children to direct the axes of the two eyes convergingly upon an object, and presumed that the visual image of but one eye was appreciated at a time. Dr. Scarborough does not seem to have deduced from this that the images differed, and thus imparted the sensation of rotundity or saliency to the object, nor the other fact that the angle of convergence of the axes gave the impression of distance. He came very near to these
road after nightfall. In 1667 the lighting and police arrangements of Paris were improved; the project was that of the Abbe Laudati, and was legalized in 1662. In 1671 the lamps were ordered to be lighted from the 20th of October to the end of March, having previously been kept lighted only during the four winter months; at this time the lamps were kept burning on moonlight nights as well as others. Their number in 1771 was estimated at 6.232. Amsterdam had street lanterns in 1669; The Hague, 1678; Copenhagen, 1681; Hamburg, 1675; Berlin, 1682; Vienna, 1704; Birmingham, England, 1733. For lighting by gas, see gas. Street-lamp. In the example, the glass is in a single piece, flaring at top, and having an opening at the bottom to receive the burner. The cover, to which it is attached, is conical in shape, is supported by four rods affixed to the top of the lamp-post, and is capped by a perforated hood. James L. Ewin's street-lamp has a supply of naphtha or other oil
o a gale, it was cut when 16 miles had been paid out. It was subsequently recovered in 1854, the depth of water being 150 fathoms, and found in good preservation. i and j are the cables connecting Dover and Ostend, and Portpatrick and Donaghadee. These two cables are precisely similar in size and general construction, each having six wires; some improvements, however, have been introduced into the latter. Telegraph-cables. k, is the shore end of the cable between Orfordness and the Hague. Each cable is composed of a single wire, the whole being brought together near the shore and twisted into one. l, the cable between Prince Edward's Island and New Brunswick. m, that across the Great Belt, in Denmark. n, that across the Mississippi at New Orleans, on the Balize line. Malta and Alexandria cable. The Malta and Alexandria cable (a b, Fig. 6244) is composed of seven copper conducting wires, over which are three layers of gutta-percha and one of tarred yarn, th
d boat load of cavalry were hurried out, and at about ten o'clock were followed by the infantry and ambulances. The route agreed upon was through a place called the Hague, and thence to Warsaw. The rebel cavalry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Chapman, of Mosby's command, were constantly hovering about our column, and being splendidly mounted, and familiar with the roads, were able to avoid a collision with anything more than our advance and rear guard. About a mile from the Hague they made a slight stand, but were driven by our charge, and chased into the village. At every cross-roads the enemy would separate, each squad taking a different path, until our cavy three men. These were captured and sent back toward the main column, but were retaken, together with a portion of their guard, on the way. Nothing was found at the Hague of any value. At the point where the skirmish commenced, there was a blacksmith's shop and quite an extensive wheelwright's establishment. These, with a granar
th of Montrose, near the mansion of Mr. Hungerford, a former clerk in the United States Treasury Department. He has several daughters, and one among them exhibited the utmost coolness under these trying circumstances. As our men were driving off her father's stock, she waved her head politely, and spoke as kindly as though all was expected. There the force was divided, one party under the command of Captain Hart, proceeded to the Rappahannock direct, by way of the rich country called the Hague, while the main party, under the command of the Colonel in person, took the direct road to Warsaw, the county town of Richmond county. When within some two miles of the town, we met two or three rebel horsemen, who attempted to escape but failed, as we succeeded in capturing one Sergeant Montgomery, the enrolling officer of Richmond county. Before he would surrender, however, he had his horse shot from under him. The command now marched direct to Warsaw, and in the immediate vicinity cap
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Fourth: orations and political speeches. (search)
in foreign lands. The number of votes cast in the Slave States, exclusive of South Carolina, where the electors are chosen by the Legislature, at the last Presidential election, was 845,050, while the number of votes cast in the Free States was 2,027,006. And yet there are four persons in the cabinet from the Slave States, and three only from the Free States, while a slave-holding President presides over all. The diplomatic representation of the country at Paris, St. Petersburg, Vienna, the Hague, Brussels, Frankfort, Madrid, Lisbon, Naples, Chili, Mexico, is now confided to persons from Slave-holding States; and at Rome, our Republic is represented by the son of the great adversary of the Wilmot Proviso, and in Berlin, by a late Senator, who was rewarded with this high appointment in consideration of his services to Slavery; while the principles of Freedom abroad are confined to the anxious care of the recently appointed Minister to England. But this is not all. Secondly.—The adm
in foreign lands. The number of votes cast in the Slave States, exclusive of South Carolina, where the electors are chosen by the Legislature, at the last Presidential election, was 845,050, while the number of votes cast in the Free States was 2,027,006. And yet there are four persons in the cabinet from the Slave States, and three only from the Free States, while a slave-holding President presides over all. The diplomatic representation of the country at Paris, St. Petersburg, Vienna, the Hague, Brussels, Frankfort, Madrid, Lisbon, Naples, Chili, Mexico, is now confided to persons from Slave-holding States; and at Rome, our Republic is represented by the son of the great adversary of the Wilmot Proviso, and in Berlin, by a late Senator, who was rewarded with this high appointment in consideration of his services to Slavery; while the principles of Freedom abroad are confined to the anxious care of the recently appointed Minister to England. But this is not all. Secondly.—The adm
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 18: Prescott and Motley (search)
een leading up to it. He had burned to express himself. He planted source-material in his mind, and the story flowered from it, naturally. For nearly ten years he plodded on, at first in Boston and then in archives abroad, in Berlin, Dresden, The Hague, and Brussels. He bathed in local colour. In 1855 he had his three volumes ready for the printer. Then came a difficulty. No publisher would look at the formidable mass of manuscript with the slightest interest. No one would believe in thesources, though they might not accept his interpretation. No one accused him of neglecting what was obtainable. They only thought He cannot understand. By that time the handsome American with his air of distinction was a well-known figure in The Hague. In 1871, the Queen of the Netherlands offered him a house in the Dutch capital, where he spent part of the years when he was working at John of Barneveld. The death of Mrs. Motley in 1874 was a blow from which her husband never recovered,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
was no want of kindly recollection, nor, when they met, of hearty sympathy; but the student days, which had been the common topics of their correspondence, had receded into the past. His correspondents were now chiefly law reporters and writers for law magazines, of whom most were contributors to the Jurist. Among them were Richard Peters, Charles S. Daveis, Mr. Daveis, of Portland, Maine, who was a friend of Sumner's father, was learned in equity and admiralty law. On his return from the Hague, where he went in 1830 to assist in preparing the case of the United States against Great Britain, involving the north-east boundary dispute, then pending before an arbitrator, he formed in England relations of friendship with some eminent persons, among them Earl Fitzwilliam. He died March 29, 1865, aged seventy-six. A sketch of his life may be found in the Memorials of the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati, of which he was a member. He was very fond of Sumner, and took a great i
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