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T. Maccius Plautus, Menaechmi, or The Twin Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), Introduction, THE SUBJECT. (search)
a child, accompanied his father to Tarentum, at which place he was stolen and carried away to Epidamnus, where in course of time he has married a wealthy wife. Disagreements, however, arising with hto manhood, determines to seek his lost brother. Having wandered for six years, lie arrives at Epidamnus, attended by his servant, Messenio. In consequence of his resemblance to his brother, many curand laughable mistakes happen between him and the Courtesan Erotium, the wife of Menaechmus of Epidamnus, the Cook Cylindrus, the Parasite Peniculus, the father-in-law of Menaechmus of Epidamnus, andEpidamnus, and lastly Messenio himself. At length, through the agency of the latter, the brothers recognize each other; on which Messenio receives his liberty, and Menaechmus of Epidamnus resolves to make sale of e latter, the brothers recognize each other; on which Messenio receives his liberty, and Menaechmus of Epidamnus resolves to make sale of his possessions and to return to Syracuse, his native place.
T. Maccius Plautus, Menaechmi, or The Twin Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), Introduction, THE ACROSTIC ARGUMENT. [Supposed to have been written by Priscian the Grammarian.] (search)
THE ACROSTIC ARGUMENT. [Supposed to have been written by Priscian the Grammarian.] A SICILIAN merchant (Mercator) who had two sons, on one being stolen from him (Ei), ended his life. As a name (Nomen) for him who is at home, his paternal grandfather (Avus) gives him that of Menaechmus instead of Sosicles. And (Et) he, as soon as he is grown up, goes to seek his brother about (Circum) all countries. At last he comes to Epidamnus; hither (Huc) the one that was stoien has been carried. All think that the stranger, Menaechmus (Menaechmum), is their fellow-citizen, and address him (Eum) as such: Courtesan, wife, and father-in-law. There (Ibi) at last the brothers mutually recognize each other.
T. Maccius Plautus, Menaechmi, or The Twin Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act prologue, scene 0 (search)
his father among the people. A certain merchant of Epidamnus was there; he picked up the child, and carried it away to EpidamnusTo Epidamnus: Epidamnus, or Epidamnum, was a town of Macedonia, situate on the Adriatic Sea. Epidamnus: Epidamnus, or Epidamnum, was a town of Macedonia, situate on the Adriatic Sea. It was much resorted to for the purpose of transit to the opposite shores of Italy. It received its original naEpidamnus, or Epidamnum, was a town of Macedonia, situate on the Adriatic Sea. It was much resorted to for the purpose of transit to the opposite shores of Italy. It received its original name from Epidamnus, one of its kings but on falling into the possession of the Romans, they changed its name, asEpidamnus, one of its kings but on falling into the possession of the Romans, they changed its name, as we are informed by Pliny the Elder, into Dyrrachium, from a superstitious notion that when hey were going to "co," or "crier.". Now must I speed back on foot to Epidamnus, that I may exactly disclose this matter to you. Ilaugh. wishes anything to be transacted for him at Epidamnus, command me boldly and speak out; but on these tertwin, who dwells at Syracuse, has come this day to Epidamnus with his servant to make enquiry for this own twin-brother of his. This is the city of Epidamnus while this play is acting; when another shall be acted, it will
T. Maccius Plautus, Menaechmi, or The Twin Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 1, scene 2 (search)
Enter MENAECHMUS of Epidamnus, from his house. MENAECHMUS of Epidamnus. speaking at the door to his WIFE within. Unless you were worthless, unless you were foolish, unless you were stark wild and an idiot, that which you see is disagreable to your husband, you would deem to be so to yourself as well. Moreover, if after this day you do any such thing to me, I'll force you, a divorced woman, turned out of my doors to go visit your father. For as often as I wish to go out of the house, you are detaining me, calling me back, asking me questions; whither I am going, what matter I am about, what business I am transacting, what I am wanting, what I am bringing, what I have been doing out of doors? I've surely brought home a custom-house officerA custom-house officer: The "portitores" examined those who landed or embarked at any port, to see that they had no merchandize about them which had not paid duty. They also made the necessary enquiries who the parties were, and what was their desti
T. Maccius Plautus, Menaechmi, or The Twin Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 2, scene 1 (search)
mer travellersLike summer travellers: Of course lighter garments and a less weight of luggage would be carried by travellers in the heat of summer. By my troth, I guess, if you don't be returning home, while you're seeking your twin-brother, you'll surely be groaningYou'll surely be groaning: He intends a puerile play upon the resemblance of the words "gemes," "will be groaning," and "geminum," "twin-brother.", when you have nothing left. For such is this race of people; among the men of Epidamnus there are debauchees and very great drinkers; swindlers besides, and many wheedlers are living in this city; then the women in the harlot line are said nowhere in the world to be more captivating. The name of Epidamnus was given to this city for the very reason, because hardly any person sojourns here without some damnable mishapsSome damnable mishap: "Sine damno," Literally, "without mischief" or "mishap." He puns on the resemblance of "damnum" to "Epidamnum." An attempt has been made in
T. Maccius Plautus, Menaechmi, or The Twin Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley), act 2, scene 3 (search)
MESSENIO Didn't I say that these things are in the habit of occurring here? The leaves are falling now; in comparison with this, if we shall be here for three days, the trees will be tumbling upon you. For to such a degree are all these Courtesans wheedlers out of one's money. But only let me address her. Harkye, woman, I'm speaking to you. EROTIUM What's the matter? MESSENIO Where have you yourself known this person? EROTIUM In that same place where he has known me for this long time, in Epidamnus. MESSENIO In Epidamnus? A man who, until this day, has never put a foot here inside of this city. EROTIUM Heyday! You are making fun, my dear Menaechmus. But, prithee, why not go in? There, it will be more suitable for you. MENAECHMUS SOSICLES I' faith, this woman really does address me rightly by my name. I wonder very much what's the meaning of this business. MESSENIO aside. That purse that you are carrying has been smelt out by her. MENAECHMUS SOSICLES aside. I' faith, and rightly have
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 2, line 526 (search)
s. Here of old Fled Cretan settlers when the dusky sail Theseus, on returning from his successful exploit in Crete, hoisted by mistake black sails instead of white, thus spreading false intelligence of disaster. Spread the false message of the hero dead; Here, where Hesperia, curving as a bow, Draws back her coast, a little tongue of land Shuts in with bending horns the sounding main. Yet insecure the spot, unsafe in storm, Were it not sheltered by an isle on which The Adriatic billows dash and fall, And tempests lose their strength: on either hand A craggy cliff opposing breaks the gale That beats upon them, while the ships within Held by their trembling cables ride secure. Hence to the mariner the boundless deep Lies open, whether for Corcyra's port He shapes his sails, or for Illyria's shore, And Epidamnus facing to the main Ionian. Here, when raging in his might Fierce Adria whelms in foam Calabria's coast, When clouds tempestuous veil Ceraunus' height, The sailor finds a haven.
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 5, line 374 (search)
afe passage to his routed foe: And thus he stirred his troops, in seas unskilled, With words of courage: 'When the winter wind 'Has seized on sky and ocean, firm its hold; But the inconstancy of cloudy spring 'Permits no certain breezes to prevail 'Upon the billows. Straight shall be our course. 'No winding nooks of coast, but open seas Struck by the northern wind alone we plough, 'And may he bend the spars, and bear us swift 'To Grecian cities; else Pompeius' ships 'From coasts Phaeacian,Dyrrhachium was founded by the Corcyreans, with whom the Homeric Phaeacians have been identified. with their swifter oars May catch our flagging sails. Cast loose the ropes 'From our victorious prows. Too long we waste 'Tempests that blow to bear us to our goal.' Now sank the sun to rest; the evening star Shone on the darkening heaven, and the moon Reigned with her paler light, when all the fleet Freed from retaining cables seized the main. With slackened sheet the canvas wooed the breeze, Which ros
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 6, line 1 (search)
p. Then marching swift By hidden path between the wooded fields He seeks, and hopes to seize, Dyrrhachium's Dyrrhachium (Durazzo) was a Corcyraean colony, but the founder was of Corinth, the metropolDyrrhachium (Durazzo) was a Corcyraean colony, but the founder was of Corinth, the metropolis of Corcyra. It stood some sixty miles north of the Ceraunian promotory (Book V., 751). About the year 1100 it was stormed and taken by Robert the Guiscard, after furious battles with the troops ofDurazzo) was a Corcyraean colony, but the founder was of Corinth, the metropolis of Corcyra. It stood some sixty miles north of the Ceraunian promotory (Book V., 751). About the year 1100 it was stormed and taken by Robert the Guiscard, after furious battles with the troops ofthe Emperor Alexius. It may be observed that, according to Caesar's account, he succeeded in getting between Pompey and Dyrrhachium, 'De Bello Celtico,' III., 41, 42. fort; But Magnus, swifter speDyrrhachium, 'De Bello Celtico,' III., 41, 42. fort; But Magnus, swifter speeding by the sea, First camped on Petra's slopes, a rocky hill Thus by the natives named. From thence he keeps Watch o'er the fortress of Corinthian birth Which by its towers alone without a guard Wad her in With bulwarks girded by the foamy main: And but for one short bridge of narrow earth Dyrrhachium were an island. Steep and fierce, Dreaded of sailors, are the cliffs that bear Her walls; and
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 10, line 434 (search)
s, shalt thou be appeased. Still, though was slain the author of the strife, Sank not their rage: with Ganymede for chief Again they rush to arms; in deeds of fight Again they conquer. So might that one day Have witnessed Caesar's fate; so might its fame Have lived through ages. As the Roman Chief, Crushed on the narrow surface of the mole, Prepared to throw his troops upon the ships, Sudden upon him the surrounding foes With all their terrors came. In dense array Their navy lined the shores, while on the rear The footmen ceaseless charged. No hope was left, For flight was not, nor could the brave man's arm Achieve or safety or a glorious death. Not now were needed for great Caesar's fall, Caught in the toils of nature, routed host Or mighty heaps of slain: his only doubt To fear or hope for death: while on his brain Brave Scaeva's image flashed, now vainly sought, Who on the wall by Epidamnus' fields Earned fame immortal, and with single arm Drove back Pompeius as he trod the breach.
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