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Corrigenda and Addenda Volume I postscript, following p. XIV. In the last sentence of the second paragraph, too much borrowing is implied. For passage read sentence, and dele etc. Page 3, line 13 from bottom. Old Town was part of Newbury, Mass. Page 4, line 13. Dele both commas. Page 12, note 3. The record reads, conformably to our guess, and here with her Child. Page 14, line 5. Read, Kinsale, County Cork, Munster. Page 78, line 12, and page 98, line 10. For Malcolm read Malcom. Page 87, line 17. For Handwich read Hardwick. Page 132. The passage quoted in the second paragraph is from Fisher Ames. Page 161, line 5 from bottom. For 1858 read 1848. Page 289, last sentence of note 1. It was Isaac Winslow (not Nathan) who lived for a time at Danvers, Mass. Page 301, line 4 from bottom. Supply an apostrophe after Thoughts. Page 332, last paragraph; and page 401, first paragraph. Whittier's poem to W. L. G. was composed early in 1832 and p
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays, A charge with Prince Rupert. (search)
e 27, 1643), that the memory of this deceased Colonel is such that in no age to come but it will more and more be had in honor and esteem; a man so religious, and of that prudence, judgment, temper, valor, and integrity, that he hath left few his like behind him. And we must leave Rupert to his career of romantic daring, to be made President of Wales and Generalissimo of the army,--to rescue with unequalled energy Newark and York and the besieged heroine of Lathom House,to fight through Newbury and Marston Moor and Naseby, and many a lesser field,--to surrender Bristol and be acquitted by court-martial, but hopelessly condemned by the Kin ;--then to leave the kingdom, refusing a passport, and fighting his perilous way to the seaside;--then to wander over the world for years, astonishing Dutchmen by his seamanship, Austrians by his soldiership, Spaniards and Portuguese by his buccaneering powers, and Frenchmen by his gold and diamonds and birds and monkeys and richly liveried Black
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays, The Puritan minister. (search)
, to exchange for £ 120 in solid cash. Solid cash included beaver-skins, black and white wampum, beads, and musket-balls, value one farthing. Mr. Woodbridge in Newbury at this same time had £ 60, and Mr. Epes preached in Salem for twenty shillings a Sunday, half in money and half in provisions. Holy Mr. Cotton used to say that odest monograph never could have been written. As for the minister's horse, the moral sentiment of the community protected him faithfully; for a man was fined in Newbury for killing our elder's mare, and a special good beast she was. The minister's house was built by the town; in Salem it was 13 feet stud, 23 by 42, four chimniesthem: in portraits later than 1700 they usually replace the black skull-cap of earlier pictures, and in 1752 the tables had so far turned that a church-member in Newbury refused communion because the pastor wears a wigg. Yet Increase Mather thought they played no small part in producing the Boston Fire. Monstrous Periwigs, such
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 56: San Domingo again.—the senator's first speech.—return of the angina pectoris.—Fish's insult in the Motley Papers.— the senator's removal from the foreign relations committee.—pretexts for the remioval.—second speech against the San Domingo scheme.—the treaty of Washington.—Sumner and Wilson against Butler for governor.—1870-1871. (search)
d a young Japanese prince, he went by invitation of Judge Russell, collector of the port, on a revenue cutter to Minot's Ledge, where they were hoisted up in a chair into the light-house. Longfellow's Life, vol. III. p. 170. The poet saw in his friend traces of the attack of angina pectoris in the winter, and wrote to G. W. Greene: He complains that I walk too fast, and is averse to walking at all. Sumner made a brief visit to Mr. Hooper at Cotuit, and was for a day with B. P. Poore at Newbury. On September 23 he assisted at the Bird Club in commemorating the Whig State convention of 1846, in which he was a leader of the Conscience Whigs at the opening of his career. One evening in the autumn he was at Mrs. Sargent's Radical Club, where M. Coquerel, the French clergyman, was received, and where were also Wendell Phillips and James Freeman Clarke. He was glad to entertain with a dinner and a drive Forney and Daniel Dougherty He had introduced Mr. Dougherty at a lecture, Febr
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 58: the battle-flag resolution.—the censure by the Massachusetts Legislature.—the return of the angina pectoris. —absence from the senate.—proofs of popular favor.— last meetings with friends and constituents.—the Virginius case.—European friends recalled.—1872-1873. (search)
e ever known, and one of the most lovable, with all his peculiarities. While at the sea-shore he received a call from Mr. Wilson, their first meeting since the latter's stroke of paralysis. He made calls in the city on the few friends to be found there during the warm season,—one of them on Henry L. Pierce, the mayor. Early in September, in company with Longfellow, he took a drive of twenty miles in Essex County, calling on Whittier at Amesbury, and dining with B. P. Poore at his house in Newbury. The same month he attended the wedding of the daughter of his friend Mr. Bird at Walpole, and passed a few days with Mr. Hooper at Cotuit. Late in the autumn he was for a day or two at Governor Claflin's in Newtonville. He met there one evening the members of a farmer's club, owners of fine villas and spacious grounds, where, inspired by their presence, he talked for an hour or more on country life, the different breeds of cattle, chiefly the English; and here, as often with those who h
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Chapter 17: heresy and witchcraft. (search)
to the world, for which she was well whipped. For these and such like disturbances they might be deemed proper subjects either of a mad-house or house of correction, and it is to be lamented that any greater severities were made use of. Hutchinson's Hist. Mass., i. 203, 204. Some of these events are painted in Quaker colors by George Bishop, in a work entitled New England judged by the Spirit of the Lord. Elizabeth, wife of Eliakim Wardel of Hampton, being called before the church at Newbury, as a sign to them she went in (though it was exceeding hard to her modest and shamefaced disposition) naked amongst them, which put them into such a rage, instead of consideration, that they soon laid hands on her and to the next court at Ipswich had her etc. New England judged, etc., p. 376. For this offence she received twenty or thirty cruel stripes, being tyed to the fence post. Ibid., p. 377. Amongst the rest, one Deborah Wilson, who, bearing a great burthen for your hardhearte
e, became extinct; Mercy, b. 27 Sept. 1621, m. Rev. John Woodbridge, and d. at Newbury 1 July 1691, having had eleven children, three of whom were clergymen; Deborah. 1 Nov. 1654, d. young; Hannah, bap. here, m. Thomas Ayres, and was living in Newbury in 1699; Sarah, bap. here, m. Lewis, and was living in 1716; Mary, bap. 13 Jans. Rolfe, John (otherwise written Rolph), prob. s. of John Rolfe who d. at Newbury 8 Feb. 1664, m. Mary Scullard at Newbury 4 Dec. 1656, and had Mary, b. 2 Nov. Newbury 4 Dec. 1656, and had Mary, b. 2 Nov. and d. 10 Dec. 1658; Mary, b. 16 Jan. 1660; Rebecca, b. 9 Feb. 1662, m. William Cutter of Cambridge about 1680; John, b. about 1665, sold part of his father's estateip carpenter; Moses, b. 14 Oct. 1681. The first three births are recorded at Newbury (see Coffin's Hist. Newb.), the last three at Camb., and the intermediate thrrge Cooke. He was taken suddenly sick at the house of his brother Benjamin at Newbury, executed a nuncupative will 30 Sept. 1681, and died before the next morning.
s will. The known children were Samuel, b. 1606; Ann, b. 1613, m. Simon Bradstreet; Patience, m. Daniel Denison, and d. 1690; Sarah, m. Maj. Benjamin Keayne, and——Pacy; she d. 3 Nov. 1659, leaving an only child Ann (by her first husband), who m. Edward Lane, and Col. Nicholas Paige, and d. without surviving issue, 30 June 1704; and thus this branch of the Dudley family, and the entire family of Capt. Robert Keayne, became extinct; Mercy, b. 27 Sept. 1621, m. Rev. John Woodbridge, and d. at Newbury 1 July 1691, having had eleven children, three of whom were clergymen; Deborah, b. 27 Feb. 1644-5, m. Maj. Jonathan Wade of Medford, and d. about 1685; Joseph, b. 23 Sept. 1647, m. Rebecca, dau. of Edw. Tyng, and was successively Representative of Roxbury, Assistant, President of New England, Counsellor under Andros, Governor of the Isle of Wight, and member of the British Parliament, Chief Justice of New York, and Governor of Massachusetts and New Hampshire; he d. at Roxbury, 2 Ap. 1720, a
, as appears by a document recorded Mid. Reg. Deeds, i. 87. It is not known at what time she came here, nor whether she was at that time a widow. She left children, Abraham; Rebecca , who m . John Watson; and possibly Robert of Watertown. 2. Abraham, s. of Ann (1), m. Rebecca, dau. of Robert Cutler of Chs., and had Rebecca, bap. here, m. John Gibson 9 Dec. 1668; Abraham, b. 11 Nov. 1652, d. young; Abraham, b. 1 Nov. 1654, d. young; Hannah, bap. here, m. Thomas Ayres, and was living in Newbury in 1699; Sarah, bap. here, m. Lewis, and was living in 1716; Mary, bap. 13 Jan. 1660-61, d. prob. 1689; Abraham, bap. 8 Nov. 1663, d. prob. 1689; Ann, b.——, m.——Parker, and was living in 1697; Jacob, b. 12 Sept. 1668, d. 2 Oct. 1668; and perhaps others. Abraham the f. was a blacksmith, and res. on the easterly side of Brighton Street, about midway between Harvard Square and Mount Auburn Street; he owned also the lot on the opposite side of the street, where the old Porter Tavern stands.
; Jesse, b. 4 June 1797; and perhaps others. Rolfe, John (otherwise written Rolph), prob. s. of John Rolfe who d. at Newbury 8 Feb. 1664, m. Mary Scullard at Newbury 4 Dec. 1656, and had Mary, b. 2 Nov. and d. 10 Dec. 1658; Mary, b. 16 Jan. 1660Newbury 4 Dec. 1656, and had Mary, b. 2 Nov. and d. 10 Dec. 1658; Mary, b. 16 Jan. 1660; Rebecca, b. 9 Feb. 1662, m. William Cutter of Cambridge about 1680; John, b. about 1665, sold part of his father's estate to his brother-in-law William Cutter 4 June 1685, and d. before 26 Sept. 1705; Samuel, b. about 1667, sold his share of the h4, a yeoman; Henry, b. 26 Sept. 1678, a ship carpenter; Moses, b. 14 Oct. 1681. The first three births are recorded at Newbury (see Coffin's Hist. Newb.), the last three at Camb., and the intermediate three are gathered from deeds. All the sons now Lex., formerly the estate of Col. George Cooke. He was taken suddenly sick at the house of his brother Benjamin at Newbury, executed a nuncupative will 30 Sept. 1681, and died before the next morning. His w. Mary survived, and was here 2 Oct.
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