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John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Arkansas (United States) or search for Arkansas (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 33 results in 25 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kansas, (search)
from Missouri through Kansas to Santa Fe......1825 By treaty with Osage Indians the tribe locate on a tract of 7,564,000 acres in south Kansas, watered by the Arkansas, Verdigris, and Neosho rivers......Dec. 30, 1825 Fort Leavenworth, called a cantonment until 1832, established and United States troops stationed there......1cis Chouteau's log warehouse......1834 Congress makes all United States territory west of the Mississippi not in the States of Missouri and Louisiana or Territory of Arkansas Indian country ......June 30, 1834 Col. Henry Dodge, U. S. A., makes an expedition to the Rocky Mountains, leaving Fort Leavenworth May 29, and returninhe last two items valued at $161,245 in cash......June 24, 1875 Thirty thousand pounds of flour shipped from Arkansas City to Arkansas by flatboat down the Arkansas River......Aug. 20, 1875 The annals of Kansas, by Daniel W. Wilder, published......November, 1875 Incorporation of the Kansas State Historical Society......De
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Louisiana, (search)
rive with sixty-nine colonists and troops and Bienville's commission as governor of Louisiana......Feb. 9, 1718 Fort Naquitoches on the Red River established by M. Bienville......1718 New Orleans founded by Bienville......1718 Eighty girls from a house of correction in Paris arrive in charge of three Ursuline nuns......February, 1721 Balize or buoy established at the mouth of the Mississippi......1722 Company of Germans, settlers on John Law's grant ( Law's bubble ) on the Arkansas River, descend the river to near New Orleans and locate there......1722 Seat of government removed to New Orleans......1723 Black code for punishing slaves promulgated by Bienville......1724 Bienville recalled to France; Perier becomes commander-general......Aug. 9, 1726 Some Jesuits and Ursuline nuns arrive at New Orleans, and a nunnery is erected......1727 Arrival of a cargo of girls sent from France by the company, each provided with a small casket of wearing apparel......172
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Missouri, (search)
arquette descend the Mississippi to lat. 33°......1673 Robert Cavalier de La Salle descends the Mississippi to its mouth......1682 A prospecting party sent out by French governor of Louisiana ascends the Missouri River to the mouth of the Kansas......1705 Missouri included in a grant to Anthony Crozat for the exclusive privilege of the commerce of Louisiana for fifteen years, made by Louis XIV......Sept. 14, 1712 Missouri included in a grant to the Mississippi Company on the resigneamboat General Pike ascends the Mississippi to St. Louis......Aug. 2, 1817 Bill authorizing people of Missouri to frame a State constitution for admission into the Union introduced into Congress......Feb. 13, 1819 By act of Congress, Arkansas Territory is set off from Missouri......March 2, 1819 Independence, a pioneer steamboat, ascends the Missouri River and arrives at Franklin, Howard county......May 28, 1819 Western Engineer, a steamboat constructed by Col. S. H. Long for an exp
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Vicksburg, siege of (search)
outh of the Yazoo River, just above Vicksburg. The two commanders arranged a plan for attacking the city in the rear, and proceeded to attempt to execute it. The troops and boats went up the Yazoo to capture some batteries that blockaded the way, but were unsuccessful, and abandoned the project. Early in January Gen. J. A. McClernand arrived and, ranking Sherman, took the Vicksburg during the Civil War. General Pemberton's headquarters at Vicksburg. chief command, and went up the Arkansas River to attack Confederate posts. Meanwhile General Grant had arranged his army into four corps, and with it descended the river from Memphis to prosecute the siege of Vicksburg with vigor. He was soon convinced that it could not be taken by direct assault. He tried to perfect the canal begun by Williams, but failed. Then he sent a land and naval force up the Yazoo to gain the rear of Vicksburg, but was repulsed. Finally Grant sent a strong land force down the west side of the Mississipp
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Wyandot Indians (modern Wyandotte Indians) (search)
Wyandot Indians (modern Wyandotte Indians) A tribe of the Iroquois family; originally named Tionontates or Dinondadies, and settled on the shores of Lake Huron, where they cultivated tobacco to such an extent that the French called them Tobacco Indians. After being nearly destroyed by the Iroquois they moved to Lake Superior, and subsequently, by reason of disasters in war, to Michilimackinac, Detroit, and Sandusky. In 1832 they sold their lands in Ohio to the United States government and removed to Kansas, settling at the junction of the Kansas and Missouri rivers. To a small band which remained near Detroit the British government assigned the Huron reservation on the Detroit River. In 1899 there were 325 Wyandottes at the Quapaw agency in the Indian Territory. See Iroquois Confederacy, th
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