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said in reply to me, I may well print in an appendix to my speech as an additional illustration. That is all. Mr. Sumner commenced his speech about twelve o'clock, at noon, and continued till about four. The galleries of the Senate were filled with gentlemen and ladies from the North and South; and the most ominous silence prevailed. Mr. Wilson, Mr. King, Mr. Bingham, and Mr. Burlingame sat near the speaker, and, had any attempt at personal violence been made by Messrs. Keitt, Hammond, Toombs, Wigfall, or others who were present, smarting under the scourge of slavery, would doubtless have been ready to repel it. In commenting on this speech, the correspondent of The Chicago press and Tribune wrote, The speech of Charles Sumner yesterday was probably the most masterly argument against human bondage that has ever been made in this or any other country since man first commenced to oppress his fellowman. Frederic Douglass in his paper truly said, The network of his argument, th
conservative pro-slavery leaders that the Dred Scott dictum applied only to the Territories, giving the masters the legal authority to enter them with their slaves, that position was clearly deceptive. The principle involved, as laid down by the Court, was altogether too broad for that construction. In effect it put the proprietorship of human beings upon the same footing with other property rights,--and claimed for it the same constitutional protection. The bolder men of the South, like Toombs of Georgia, did not hesitate to give that interpretation to the Court's pronouncement, and to insist on it with brutal frankness. If they were wrong, the Court was putty in their hands and they could easily have had a supplemental ruling that would have gone to any extent. If the Dred Scott decision had been promulgated by our highest court, and the slaveholders had insisted upon the license it was intended to give them for taking their slave property into free territory, at the time tha
Stewart, Alvin, 205. Stillman, Edwin A., 203. Stockton, Henry K., 201 Stone, Lucy, 205. Stone, Thomas T., 205. Stowe, Harriet Beecher 11, 101, 102. Sumner, Charles, 148, 179. Sutliff, Levi, 203 Sutliff, Milton, 203. T Tappan, Arthur, 34. Tappan, Lewis, 34, 203. Taussig, James, 172. Taylor, Gen. Z., 6. Texas, annexation of, 44. Thatcher, Moses, 201. Thirteenth Amendment, 138; vote on, 143-144. Thompson, Edwin, 205. Thoughts on African Colonization, 129. Thurston, David, 202. Toombs, Robert, 13. Torrey, Charles Turner, 118-119. Townsend, Dr., 205. U Uncle Tom's Cabin, 61, 208. Underground railroad, 121-127; confession of John Smith, 121-127. United States in Far East, 85; Army increase of, 85; Navy increase of, 85. V Van Buren, Martin, 4; a doughface, 4; Free Soiler, 5. Van Zant case, 61. Vickers, Anson, 203. Virginia, 21. W Wade, Benjamin F., 44, 179, 205. Wakefield, Horace P., 202. Walker, Jonathan, branded, 119. Washington, Booker, 136. W
e had one of remarkable brightness and beauty. The chaplains of our brigade had invited Bro. Crumley — a man universally beloved — to preach for us. Generals Hood and Anderson, with their staffs, were present. The music was helped out by the band and Bro. C. preached a most appropriate sermon to a large and very attentive congregation. After the service, many retired to the woods and held prayer-meetings. There were like services on this day elsewhere. Rev. W. H. Simmons preached to General Toombs' brigade, and had an interesting meeting. Our meetings are still carried on with profit. This day, March 27th, appointed by the President, Jefferson Davis, for fasting, humiliation, and prayer, was observed in the armies with unusual solemnity. A member of Barksdale's brigade tells how the day was spent by the devout soldiers: At half-past 8 A. M. my mess, with those adjoining, met in my room for prayers, most of them being young converts; eight or nine prayers were offered al
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 18: the battle of Antietam. (search)
s in officers and men, withdrew across the Potomac to his own soil. The battle of Antietam resulted in the largest list of casualties of any one day's battle. The Union cause lost Brigadier General Mansfield, killed: Major Generals Hooker and Richardson, and Brigadier Generals Rodman, Sedgwick, Harts uff, Dana and Meagher wounded, with 12,469 killed, wounded and missing. The Confederate cause lost Brigadier Generals Branch, Anderson and Stark, killed; Major General Anderson and Brigadier Generals Toombs, Lawton, Ripley, Rodes, Gregg, Armstead and Ransom, wounded, with 25,899 killed, wounded and missing. Thirteen guns, thirty-nine colors, upwards of 15,000 stand of small arms, and more than 6,00C prisoners, were the trophies of the Army of the Potomac from the battles of South Mountain, Crampton's Gap and Antietam, while not a single gun or color was lost during these battles. Official list of casualties in the Nineteenth Massachusetts regiment at the battle of Antietam, Sep
improvement; and which, by the law of the land, protected the negro in life and limb, and in many personal rights, and, by the practice of the system, bestowed upon him a sum of individual indulgences, which made him altogether the most striking type in the world of cheerfulness and contentment. But it is not necessary to prolong this consideration. It may not be improper to note here a very sententious defence of the moral side of slavery occurring in a speech delivered, in 1856, by Senator Toombs of Georgia, in the Tremont Temple at Boston. It is briefly this: The white is the superior race, and the black the inferior; and subordination, with or without law, will be the status of the African in this mixed society; and, there-Core, it is the interest of both, and especially of the black race, and of the whole society, that this status should be fixed, controlled, and protected by law. The whole ground is covered by these two propositions: that subordination is the necessary co
rmined admonition from the South. But to this art of the demagogue there were plain and forcible replies. Mr. Howell Cobb urged that delay was dangerous, and that the Legislature ought to pass an act of secession to be ratified by the people; Mr. Toombs insisted that all hope of justice from the North was gone, and that nothing remained but separation, and, if necessary, war to maintain the rights of the South; and while the discussion was going on, the Mayor of Savannah had already pledged fh slavery in the Territories) was, as we have seen, the principal feature of these pacific negotiations; it was considered fully capable to reconstruct the Union; it had even the adhesion or countenance of such influential leaders of Secession as Toombs, of Georgia, and Jefferson Davis, the future President of the Southern Confederacy; it constituted under the circumstances the only possible existing hope of saving the Union. But, unfortunately for the peace of the country, the North deliberate
ntietam, opposite the right wing of Gen. Longstreet, commanded by Brig.-Gen. D. R. Jones. This bridge was defended by Gen. Toombs with two regiments of his brigade. Gen. Toombs' small command repulsed five different assaults, made by a greatly supGen. Toombs' small command repulsed five different assaults, made by a greatly superiour force, and maintained its position with distinguished gallantry. In the afternoon, the enemy began to extend his line, as if to cross the Antietam below the bridge, and at four, P. At., Toombs' regiments retired from the position they hadToombs' regiments retired from the position they had so bravely held. The enemy immediately crossed the bridge in large numbers, and advanced against Gen. Jones, who held the crest with less than two thousand men. After a determined and brave resistance, he was forced to give way, and the enemy gainenes. The progress of the enemy was immediately arrested, and his line began to waver. At this moment Gen. Jones ordered Toombs to charge the flank, while Archer, supported by Branch and Gregg, moved upon the front of the Federal line. The enemy ma
the same statement already given, mentioning the additional fact that on coming to consciousness he saw Mr. Douglas and Mr. Toombs standing in the Senate, and Mr. Slidell in the anteroom, from which the latter retreated at once. This statement becomd not know that any man thought of attacking him, and that he had not the slightest suspicion of what was to happen. Mr. Toombs said: As for rendering Mr. Sumner any assistance, I did not do it. As to what was said, some gentleman present condemne Mr. Wilson remarked that there was no conflict between the statements of Mr. Sumner and those of Slidell, Douglas and Toombs. The assault itself he pronounced brutal, murderous and cowardly. This provoked the exclamation You are a liar! from Mbeen adduced might be safely referred to passion, wounded feeling and inflamed hatred. The language of Slidell, Douglas, Toombs and Brooks, was evidently spoken in hot blood, and the votes of Mr. Brooks's constituents were cast in obedience to feeli
rom his sick-bed. He made substantially the same statement already given, mentioning the additional fact that on coming to consciousness he saw Mr. Douglas and Mr. Toombs standing in the Senate, and Mr. Slidell in the anteroom, from which the latter retreated at once. This statement becoming known, these Senators felt called upoow that he was in the Capitol; that he did not know that any man thought of attacking him, and that he had not the slightest suspicion of what was to happen. Mr. Toombs said: As for rendering Mr. Sumner any assistance, I did not do it. As to what was said, some gentleman present condemned it in Mr. Brooks. I stated to him, or ussion upon this floor so long as I live. Mr. Wilson remarked that there was no conflict between the statements of Mr. Sumner and those of Slidell, Douglas and Toombs. The assault itself he pronounced brutal, murderous and cowardly. This provoked the exclamation You are a liar! from Mr. Butler; although, at the request of Se
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