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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 12: Norfolk County. (search)
0.00. Total amount, $15,928.74. Dedham Incorporated Sept. 8, 1636. Population in 1860, 6,330; in 1865, 7,198. Valuation in 1860, $4,379,743; in 1865, $4,858,587. The selectmen in 1861, 1862, 1863, and 1864 were Waldo Colburn, Samuel E. Pond, J. Bradford Baker, A. B. Endicott, John Cox, Jr.; in 1865, A. B. Endicott, Samuel E. Pond, James B. Baker, Ezra W. Taft, John Cox, Jr. The town-clerk during all the years of the war was Jonathan H. Cobb. The town-treasurer in 1861 was William Whiting; in 1862, 1863, 1864, and 1865, Lewis H. Kingsbury. 1861. The first legal town-meeting to act upon matters relating to the war was held on the 6th of May, at which it was voted that the families of citizens who have already enlisted or shall enlist for service under the United States shall not want during their absence; that every volunteer, for each day spent in elementary drill, be paid one dollar and fifty cents from the 26th of April until the company is accepted by the State; t
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 60: opposition to Bureau and reconstruction work became personal; the Congregational Church of Washington (search)
imes. More than 4,000,--000 of its people sunk in the lowest depths of ignorance by two centuries of slavery,and suddenly set free amid the fierce animosities of war-free but poor, helpless, and starving. Here, truly, was a most appalling condition of things. Not only the destiny of the liberated race was in the balance, but the life of the nation itself depended upon the correct solution of this intricate problem. It was a great practical question that had to be met. The letter to Mr. Whiting, solicitor of the War Department, setting forth the details of the scheme, has been cited in another connection. His plan was substantially adopted by Congress, save in regard to the suggestion that the head of the work ought to hold a Cabinet position, to which the dignity and magnitude of his duty certainly entitled him. Then arose the practical question — who among the tried, wise, and humane men of the nation should be trusted with the execution of this work As has been before stated
Weiss, Charley, I, 215, 437. Weld, Allan H., I, 25. Welles, Gideon, I, 139. Wellington, Duke of, I, 612; II, 24, 495, 496. Wells, Spencer, I, 27. Wesells, Henry W., I, 229. Wever, Clark R., II, 64. Whaley, William, II, 238. Wheeler, Joseph, I, 541, 542, 579, 601, 602, 605, 606, 608, 609; II, 7, 14, 28, 30, 47, 74, 78, 80. Whipple, A. W., I, 157, 333. White, Julius, I, 273, 275, 276. Whiting, Henry, I, 143. Whiting, W. H. C., I, 225, 226, 239, 241. Whiting, William, II, 438. Whittaker, J. C., II, 485, 486. Whittier, John Greenleaf, II, 414. Whittle, D. W., II, 62, 570, 671. Whittlesey, Eliphalet, I, 187, 298, 309, 310, 327, 366; II, 215, 217, 233, 279, 283, 352, 353, 398-400 430, 446. Wiedrich, Michael, I, 364, 476. Wiggin, Sullivan D., I, 254. Wilcox, John, I, 22. Wilder, Charles B., II, 175. Wilkinson, M. C., 11, 461, 464, 468, 470, 566. Willard, John, I, 426, 436. Willcox, O. B., 1, 149, 154, 280, 303, 304, 311, 3
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 4: the reelection of Lincoln.—1864. (search)
leased with his spirit, and the familiar and candid way in which he unbosomed himself. Last evening I spent with Solicitor Whiting (the brother of William Whiting. Anna), and had a good time. Solicitor William Whiting, whom Secretary Stanton William Whiting. Anna), and had a good time. Solicitor William Whiting, whom Secretary Stanton appointed to expound the war powers of the Government under the Constitution, especially as relating to slavery, was a son of Mr. Garrison's early and steadfast supporter, Col. William Whiting of Concord, Mass. In his interview with the PresidenSolicitor William Whiting, whom Secretary Stanton appointed to expound the war powers of the Government under the Constitution, especially as relating to slavery, was a son of Mr. Garrison's early and steadfast supporter, Col. William Whiting of Concord, Mass. In his interview with the President, Mr. Garrison said to him: Mr. Lincoln, I want to tell you frankly that for every word I have ever spoken in your favor, I have spoken ten in favor of General Fremont; and he went on to explain how difficult he had found it to commend the PresidenCol. William Whiting of Concord, Mass. In his interview with the President, Mr. Garrison said to him: Mr. Lincoln, I want to tell you frankly that for every word I have ever spoken in your favor, I have spoken ten in favor of General Fremont; and he went on to explain how difficult he had found it to commend the President when the latter was revoking the proclamations of Fremont and Hunter, and reiterating his purpose to save the Union, if he could, without destroying slavery; but, Mr. President, he continued, from the hour that you issued the Emancipation Proclamat
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
ed the alternations of his disease; and he was touched by the affectionate interest which had been shown in him. Many called at his mother's door whom he was too ill to see. Hillard, Felton, Longfellow, and Prescott were admitted when others were denied. Theophilus Parsons and the brothers Chandler were constant in their inquiries. Bancroft enlivened the sick-chamber with his conversation, always cheery and sparkling. Macready, who knew him as a steadfast friend, sought his bedside. William Whiting offered his services as watcher. J. J. Dixwell sent daily his carriage as soon as he was able to ride. Richard Fletcher sent a basket of grapes; William Story a brace of woodcock; and the family of George B. Emerson remembered him with similar tokens of regard. The Waterstons sent books, and invited him to the Quincy mansion, where the bracing airs of land and sea might hasten recovery. Similar invitations came from John Jay, at Bedford, N. Y.; Theodore Sedgwick, in New York; Samuel
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 48: Seward.—emancipation.—peace with France.—letters of marque and reprisal.—foreign mediation.—action on certain military appointments.—personal relations with foreigners at Washington.—letters to Bright, Cobden, and the Duchess of Argyll.—English opinion on the Civil War.—Earl Russell and Gladstone.—foreign relations.—1862-1863. (search)
ear compromise. Time is essential; so great a revolution cannot come to a close at once. By next steamer we send you Mr. Whiting William Whiting, of Boston. He was distinguished at the bar as counsel in patent causes. He died in 1873 at the aWilliam Whiting, of Boston. He was distinguished at the bar as counsel in patent causes. He died in 1873 at the age of sixty, before taking a seat in Congress, to which he had been elected.—an admirable lawyer, in the full confidence of the President, and my personal friend, agreeing with me positively in policy and object — to take the place of Mr. Evarts, toence. He was silent from January, 1861, to October, 1863, and then replied to a recent note from Sumner introducing William Whiting, of Boston. He had heretofore disapproved Sumner's style of dealing with slavery and its supporters, and he was nowut no reverse can change the inevitable result, which is just as sure as the multiplication table,—how soon, I know not. Whiting has returned to cheer us with good news from England that no more Alabamas will be allowed to make England a naval base<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 49: letters to Europe.—test oath in the senate.—final repeal of the fugitive-slave act.—abolition of the coastwise slave-trade.—Freedmen's Bureau.—equal rights of the colored people as witnesses and passengers.—equal pay of colored troops.—first struggle for suffrage of the colored people.—thirteenth amendment of the constitution.— French spoliation claims.—taxation of national banks.— differences with Fessenden.—Civil service Reform.—Lincoln's re-election.—parting with friends.—1863-1864. (search)
r they were to be paid thirteen dollars a month, like other soldiers, or only ten, under the Act of July 17, 1862, which provided the smaller sum for persons of African descent employed under it. The Secretary of War, confirming an opinion of Mr. Whiting, the solicitor of that department, placed them under this Act; but Governor Andrew strenuously contended that they came under the general acts which determined the pay of enlisted men, and should be paid equally with other soldiers. He, as weo decided in favor of the claim of the colored troops to equality of pay. Many letters on the subject passed between Governor Andrew and Sumner, and the former thanked the senator for his constant advocacy of a just measure. Neither Stanton nor Whiting intended injustice to the colored troops; but the different statutes raised a doubt which they gave in favor of the government, while fuller discussion led the attorney-general to an opposite conclusion. At this session began the controversy
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, chapter 10 (search)
on the return to specie payments, but death prevented his carrying out his purpose. This speech on finance greatly strengthened Sumner's position with the commercial and conservative classes, who, though approving his prudent course on foreign relations, were rarely in accord with his action on questions growing out of slavery and reconstruction. Letters approving his speech and action on financial questions came from A. A. Lawrence, T. M. Brewer, R. H. Dana, Jr., P. W. Chandler, and William Whiting. Mr. William Amory, a worthy representative of the Boston merchants of the old type, who had been accustomed to regard Sumner as an enthusiast of dangerous ability, and had been severe in his strictures on the senator, thus expressed the opinion of his class at this time:— But this is no reason why I should not feel and express to you my great admiration for the cogent, simple, but masterly manner in which you have treated the practical question of financial reconstruction, in lan
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 56: San Domingo again.—the senator's first speech.—return of the angina pectoris.—Fish's insult in the Motley Papers.— the senator's removal from the foreign relations committee.—pretexts for the remioval.—second speech against the San Domingo scheme.—the treaty of Washington.—Sumner and Wilson against Butler for governor.—1870-1871. (search)
conversation was confined exclusively to public business. Sumner did not fail to deny positively the statement, when coming from any responsible quater, that he had declined to hold any intercourse, official or otherwise, with Mr. Fish. William Whiting of Boston, former solicitor of the war department, having repeated the statement as he had heard it from others, and being called to account by the senator, admitted after a careful inquiry that he had been misinformed. He closed his letterstrong desire for a hearing on the violations of international law and of the Constitution in the employment of the naval forces at San Domingo. In the course of preparation I submitted certain questions to W. Beach Lawrence, Richard H. Dana, W. Whiting, and Dr. Lieber, four distinguished publicists, with whom I have been in the habit of conferring on questions of international law; but I never communicated to either of them my own conclusions, or anything I proposed to say,—except that in con
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4, Chapter 57: attempts to reconcile the President and the senator.—ineligibility of the President for a second term.—the Civil-rights Bill.—sale of arms to France.—the liberal Republican party: Horace Greeley its candidate adopted by the Democrats.—Sumner's reserve.—his relations with Republican friends and his colleague.—speech against the President.—support of Greeley.—last journey to Europe.—a meeting with Motley.—a night with John Bright.—the President's re-election.—1871-1872. (search)
f all the issues of the war. There will be difficulties and trials; but the object is worthy of any effort. As the San Domingo scheme was without favor among the people, Republican speakers were disposed to attribute the estrangement of the President and the senator to other and earlier matters on which they may have differed, but at the time without feeling. Whenever this was attempted by persons at all responsible, with whom Sumner was in personal relations,—as Sherman, Boutwell, William Whiting, and Gerrit Smith,—he was prompt with denial, and usually brought a withdrawal or explanation of the statement. Sumner's speech in the Senate was made primarily to prevent Grant's nomination, which, however, was a foregone conclusion. He was nominated without dissent, and Wilson's name was put on the ticket with his for the Vice-Presidency. But the senator withheld any declaration as to his purpose in supporting candidates; and he was still plied on both sides,—by Republican leade<
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