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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2, XIV. Massachusetts women in the civil war. (search)
sickening work Mrs. Tyler broke down, and in the summer of 1864 was obliged to leave her post of duty. She was so prostrated by hospital fever as to render her recovery for a time extremely doubtful. She was sent to Europe by her physician as soon as she began to convalesce, but was prostrated by a return of the fever in Paris, and months later in Lucerne, Switzerland, nor was her health re-established until some time after the close of the war. Mrs. Stephen Barker, the sister of Hon. William Whiting, an Attorney-General of Massachusetts, and whose husband was chaplain of the Fourteenth Massachusetts Infantry, accompanied him to the field and devoted herself to hospital nursing and relief, serving in almost every capacity, and identifying herself with the patients under her care. Mrs. G. T. M. Davis, a native of Pittsfield, Mass., and the wife of a colonel who served with distinction during the Mexican war, resided in New York City during the civil war. She rendered invaluable
104, p. 305. —Our soldiers; rev. of several memorials. See Soldiers. North American Rev., vol. 99, p. 172. —Sanitary commission; report. C. Stille, rev. of. North American Rev., vol. 104, p. 142. —War powers under the constitution. Wm. Whiting, rev. of. North American Rev., vol. 101, p. 237. —With Gen. Sheridan in Lee's last campaign. Staff officer, anon., rev. of. North American Rev., vol. 104, p. 252. Noyes, Geo. F. Antietam; from Bivouac and Battlefield. Harper's Mon.,862, p. 4, col. 2. — 1863. Jan. 7, 8. Naval raid; letter from the U. S. ship Commodore Morris. Boston Evening Journal, Jan. 14, 1863, p. 4, col. 4. White Oak Swamp Bridge, Va. June 13, 1864. Army and Navy Journal, vol. 1, p. 721. Whiting, Wm. War powers under the constitution, rev. of. C. E. Norton. North American Rev., vol. 101, p. 237. Whitman, Walt. Some war memoranda; paying the 1st U. S. C. T., 54th Regt. M. V. I. North American Rev., vol. 144, p. 55. Whitney,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2, Index of names of persons. (search)
m, Navy, 152 White, William, 35th Mass. Inf., 370 Whitin, C. P., 685 Whitin, L. F., 152 Whitin, Paul, 585 Whiting, Adoniram, 162 Whiting, C. G., 162 Whiting, C. J., 453 Whiting, J. B., 371 Whiting, P. M., 371 Whiting, W. D., 152 Whiting, William, 599 Whiting, William, 731 Whitman, E. B., 453, 565 Whitman, F. M., 500 Whitman, Frank, 391 Whitman, G. A., 371 Whitman, H. H., 573 Whitman, J. B., 371 Whitman, J. F., 152 Whitman, N. D., 371 Whitman, Walt, 731 Whitmarsh, ZachariaWhiting, William, 731 Whitman, E. B., 453, 565 Whitman, F. M., 500 Whitman, Frank, 391 Whitman, G. A., 371 Whitman, H. H., 573 Whitman, J. B., 371 Whitman, J. F., 152 Whitman, N. D., 371 Whitman, Walt, 731 Whitmarsh, Zachariah, Jr., 152 Whitmore, Benjamin, 152 Whitmore, H. C., 152 Whitmore, John, 152 Whitney, A. C., 154 Whitney, A. D. T., Mrs., 731 Whitney, A. W., 391, 565 Whitney, C. E., 371 Whitney, Carrie F., 585 Whitney, Clarence, 371 Whitney, Edward, 585 Whitney, Edwin, 371, 566 Whitney, F. A., 605 Whitney, G. D., 585 Whitney, H. A., 585 Whitney, J. H., 371 Whitney, J. M., 371 Whitney, J. P., 371 Whitney, John, 453, 566 Whitney, Julius, 371 Whitney, N. D., 585 Whitney, S. C., 371 Whitney
ut was prevented by the fire of the gunboats. Two hundred of his men were drowned, and subsequently one thousand captured. Morgan, with one thousand men, had turned back, moving towards Gallipoli. A telegram, dated Hagerstown, 19th, says that the rear guard of Lee's army left Martinsburg at two o'clock Saturday morning. Meade's whole army is across the Potomac, rapidly following. Lee is retreating his main force by Strasburg, via Staunton, and not Culpeper. The American says that "the Hon. William Whiting, Solicitor of the War Department, leaves Boston on Wednesday, for Europe, as the commissioned legal adviser of our Ministers in England and France. His mission is said to be one of vast importance, and is reported to have reference to the building in England of iron clad ships, supposed to be intended for the rebel army." Perfect quiet continued in New York, and there are no indications of a renewal of the riot. Gold had advanced in New York from 125½ to 127½.
Asking relief. --Judge Meredith has granted a writ of habeas corpus to the following free negroes, arrested at Deep Bottom on charge of furnishing information to the Yankee Government, and will give them a hearing to day, or early next week. Their names are William and Sylvia Scott, Wm T and Margaret James, Wm. R. and Elizabeth James, Robert James, Edward George, Shadrack James, Robert and Georgiana Fagan, Billy James, Edward and Sarah Seaft, Wm. Whiting, Henry Pleasants, Norman Harris, Parthena Holmes, Elizabeth Scott, Waltball James, Jos R Fagan, Mildred Fagan, Emily Bradley, Kesiah Fagan, Wm E Fagan, Mary W Green, Marcellus James, and Hester Walker--27 in all.
Habeas corpus. --On Saturday last the following free negroes — William and Sylvia Scott, Wm. T. and Margaret James, Wm. H. and Elizabeth James, Robert James, Edward George, Shadrack James, Robert and Georgianna Fagan, Billy James, Edward and Sarah Scott, Wm. Whiting, Henry Pleasants, Norman Harris, Parthena Holmes, Elizabeth Scott, Walthall James, Joseph R. Fagan, Mildred Fagan, Emily Bradley, Kesiah Fagan, Wm. E. Fagan, Mary W. Green, Marcellus James, and Hester Walker--27 in all — were before Judge Meredith on a writ of habeas corpus, alleging that they were illegally detained in custody. The warrant on which the parties were arrested named about thirty men; but the officers who executed it, believing that the women and children were equally guilty of aiding the enemy, took them into custody. After hearing the evidence, the Judge ordered the release of the women and children, but held the men for further examination next Wednesday, and directed the constables to proceed at o
The Daily Dispatch: February 9, 1864., [Electronic resource], What would become of Southern property — the Punishment of "treason." (search)
ate in store for us if so great a curse as subjugation were by any chance to overtake us. The Hon. Wm. Whiting, Solicitor of the Federal War Department, whose letter in favor of the entire confiscatio descend anis after the rebellion shall have been suppressed and the Union restored." Solicitor Whiting, discussing the subject and of feet of "bills of attainder," says there are essential charlict certain penalties, among which were corruption of attainder was in corruption of blood. Mr. Whiting says: "Unless a law of Congress shall contain these four characteristics, penalty of de, ex post facte law, or law impairing the obligation of contracts." There is, therefore, says Mr. Whiting, "no power in this country to pass any bill of attainder." He says: "In the technical law stalamation, in accordance with and founded on the above act, issued July 25, 1862, makes it, as Mr. Whiting says.-- "One of the most important acts ever passed by the Congress of the United States. "
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