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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The firing and sinking of the stout and warre-like Carack called Las Cinque Llaguas, or, The five Wounds, by three tall Ships set foorth at the charges of the right honorable the Erle of Cumberland and his friends: Written by the discreet and valiant captaine M. Nicholas Downton. (search)
m at sea. The sixt of Aprill 1594 we set sayle in the sound of Plimmouth, directing our course toward the coast of Spaine. The 24 of the sayd moneth at the Admirals direction wee divided our selves East and West from ech other, being then in the heigth of 43 degrees, with commaundement at night to come together againe. The 27 day in the morning we descried the May-flower and the litle Pinnasse with a Prise that they had taken, being of Viana in Portugall, and bound for Angola in Africa . This Barke was of 28 tunnes, having some 17 persons in the same. There were in her some 12 Buts of Galicia wine, whereof we tooke into every shippe a like part, with some Ruske in chests and barrels, with 5 buts of blew course cloth, and certaine course linnencloth for Negros shirts, which goods were divided among our fleet. The 4 of May we had sight of our Pinnasse, and the Admirals Shallop which had taken three Portugall Caravels, whereof they had sent two away and kept the third.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The English Voyages, Navigations, and Discoveries (intended for the finding of a North-west passage) to the North parts of America, to Meta incognita, and the backeside of Gronland , as farre as 72 degrees and 12 minuts: performed first by Sebastian Cabota, and since by Sir Martin Frobisher, and M. John Davis, with the Patents, Discourses, and Advertisements thereto belonging. (search)
any , were Indians, & not inhabiters of any part either of Africa or America , it is manifest, because the natives both of AAfrica and America neither had, or have at this day (as is reported) other kind of boates then such as do beare neither mastSoutheast, Southwest, Northeast, or from any other part of Africa or America , and therefore this Northwest passage having be the middle Zone to be extreme hot, because the people of Africa , especially the Ethiopians, are so cole blacke, and their and not by his neerenesse to the earth: for throughout all Africa , yea in the middest of the middle Zone, and in all other p and cursed Chus came all these blacke Moores which are in Africa , for after the water was vanished from off the face of thead that which now is called Europa, wherein wee dwell, and Africa remained for Cham and his blacke sonne Chus, and was callis example, that these blacke men are found in allparts of Africa , as well without the Tropickes, as within, even unto Capo
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A discourse written by Sir Humphrey Gilbert Knight, to prove a passage by the Northwest to Cathaia, and the East Indies. (search)
hath partly taught us. 6 And further, to proove that these people so arriving upon the coast of Germany , were Indians, & not inhabiters of any part either of Africa or America , it is manifest, because the natives both of Africa and America neither had, or have at this day (as is reported) other kind of boates then such as Africa and America neither had, or have at this day (as is reported) other kind of boates then such as do beare neither mastes nor sailes, (except onely upon the coasts of Barbarie and the Turkes ships) but do carie themselves from place to place neere the shore by the ore onely. To proove that those Indians came not by the Northeast, and that there is no thorow navigable passage that way. Cap. 6. IT is lik IT is as likely that they came by the Northwest, as it is unlikely that they should come either by the Southeast, Southwest, Northeast, or from any other part of Africa or America , and therefore this Northwest passage having bene alreadie so many wayes proved, by disprooving of the others, &c. I shall the lesse neede in this pla
ne Ocean through that fret, from the West seas of America , as Magellans experience hath partly taught us. 6 And further, to proove that these people so arriving upon the coast of Germany , were Indians, & not inhabiters of any part either of Africa or America , it is manifest, because the natives both of Africa and America neither had, or have at this day (as is reported) other kind of boates then such as do beare neither mastes nor sailes, (except onely upon the coasts of Barbarie and t taught us. 6 And further, to proove that these people so arriving upon the coast of Germany , were Indians, & not inhabiters of any part either of Africa or America , it is manifest, because the natives both of Africa and America neither had, or have at this day (as is reported) other kind of boates then such as do beare neither mastes nor sailes, (except onely upon the coasts of Barbarie and the Turkes ships) but do carie themselves from place to place neere the shore by the ore onely.
To proove that the Indians aforenamed, came only by the Northwest, which induceth a certaintie of our passage by experience. Cap. 7. IT is as likely that they came by the Northwest, as it is unlikely that they should come either by the Southeast, Southwest, Northeast, or from any other part of Africa or America , and therefore this Northwest passage having bene alreadie so many wayes proved, by disprooving of the others, &c. I shall the lesse neede in this place, to use many words otherwise then to conclude in this sort, That they came onely by the Northwest from England, having these many reasons to leade me thereunto. 1 First, the one halfe of the windes of the compasse might bring them by the Northwest, bearing alwayes betweene two sheats, with which kind of sayling the Indians are onely acquainted, not having any use of a bow line, or quarter winde, without the which no ship can possibly come either by the Southeast, Southwest or Northeast, having so many sundry Capes to dou
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true discourse of the three Voyages of discoverie, for the finding of a passage to Cathaya, by the Northwest, under the conduct of Martin Frobisher Generall: Before which, as a necessary Preface is prefixed a twofolde discourse, conteining certaine reasons to prove all partes of the World habitable. Penned by Master George Best, a Gentleman employed in the same voyages. (search)
th us foorth. Others againe imagine the middle Zone to be extreme hot, because the people of Africa , especially the Ethiopians, are so cole blacke, and their haire like wooll curled short, which , but by way of Angle in reflection, and not by his neerenesse to the earth: for throughout all Africa , yea in the middest of the middle Zone, and in all other places upon the tops of mountaines theto all the worlde. And of this blacke and cursed Chus came all these blacke Moores which are in Africa , for after the water was vanished from off the face of the earth, and that the lande was dry, Sch nowe is called Asia , and Japhet had that which now is called Europa, wherein wee dwell, and Africa remained for Cham and his blacke sonne Chus, and was called Chamesis after the fathers name, bate; Which also may bee prooved by this example, that these blacke men are found in allparts of Africa , as well without the Tropickes, as within, even unto Capo de buona Speranza Southward, where, b
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Experiences and reasons of the Sphere, to proove all partes of the worlde habitable, and thereby to confute the position of the five Zones. (search)
th us foorth. Others againe imagine the middle Zone to be extreme hot, because the people of Africa , especially the Ethiopians, are so cole blacke, and their haire like wooll curled short, which , but by way of Angle in reflection, and not by his neerenesse to the earth: for throughout all Africa , yea in the middest of the middle Zone, and in all other places upon the tops of mountaines theto all the worlde. And of this blacke and cursed Chus came all these blacke Moores which are in Africa , for after the water was vanished from off the face of the earth, and that the lande was dry, Sch nowe is called Asia , and Japhet had that which now is called Europa, wherein wee dwell, and Africa remained for Cham and his blacke sonne Chus, and was called Chamesis after the fathers name, bate; Which also may bee prooved by this example, that these blacke men are found in allparts of Africa , as well without the Tropickes, as within, even unto Capo de buona Speranza Southward, where, b
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Voyages of the English Nation to Newfoundland , to the Isles of Ramea, and the Isles of Assumption otherwise called Natiscotec, situate at the mouth of the River of Canada, and to the coastes of Cape Briton, and Arambec, corruptly called Norumbega, with the Patents, letters, and advertisements thereunto belonging. (search)
t and Christendome, bringing them to the high water marke, and when hee doubteth that any of those great Cods by reason of shelving ground bee like to tumble into the Sea againe, hee will warily take heede and carrie him up backe to the heape of his fellowes. This doeth cause my friendes to wonder, and at the first hearing to judge them notorious lies, but they laugh and are merrie when they heare the meanes howe each tale is true. I tolde you once I doe remember how in my travaile into Africa and America , I found trees that bare Oisters, which was strange to you, till I tolde you that their boughes hung in the water, on which both Oisters and Muskles did sticke fast, as their propertie is, to stakes and timber. Nowe to let these merrie tales passe, and to come to earnest matters againe, you shall understand, that Newfoundland is in a temperate Climate, and not so colde as foolish Mariners doe say, who finde it colde sometimes when plentie of Isles of yce lie neere the shore
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter written to M. Richard Hakluyt of the middle Temple, conteining a report of the true state and commodities of Newfoundland , by M. Anthonie Parkhurst Gentleman, 1578. (search)
t and Christendome, bringing them to the high water marke, and when hee doubteth that any of those great Cods by reason of shelving ground bee like to tumble into the Sea againe, hee will warily take heede and carrie him up backe to the heape of his fellowes. This doeth cause my friendes to wonder, and at the first hearing to judge them notorious lies, but they laugh and are merrie when they heare the meanes howe each tale is true. I tolde you once I doe remember how in my travaile into Africa and America , I found trees that bare Oisters, which was strange to you, till I tolde you that their boughes hung in the water, on which both Oisters and Muskles did sticke fast, as their propertie is, to stakes and timber. Nowe to let these merrie tales passe, and to come to earnest matters againe, you shall understand, that Newfoundland is in a temperate Climate, and not so colde as foolish Mariners doe say, who finde it colde sometimes when plentie of Isles of yce lie neere the shore
which the princes of Portugall have made round about the West, the South, and the East parts of Africa , and also at Callicut, and in the East Indies, and in America , at Brasile and elsewhere in sude Bon Esperanze, & passing the currents that run upon the said coast, on the Southeast part of Africa , between the said maine land & the Island of S. Laurence, otherwise called of the ancients, Madzo de Albuquerque, they did discover, people, and plant at Ceffala, being upon the East side of Africa , in the twenty degrees of latitude of the south Pole, and direct West from the Iland of S. Laurla, divers doe affirme that king Salomon did fetch his gold) as also upon the said East side of Africa , they did afterward discover, people, and plant at Mozambique , Quiola, Monbaza, and Melinde, to up to the streight of Babel-Mandell at the entring of the red sea, all upon the East coast of Africa , from whence they put off at the Cape of Guarda Fu, and past the great gulfe of Arabia , and
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