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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The seventh Chapter sheweth that the planting there, is not a matter of such charge or difficultie, as many would make it seeme to be. (search)
which the princes of Portugall have made round about the West, the South, and the East parts of Africa , and also at Callicut, and in the East Indies, and in America , at Brasile and elsewhere in sude Bon Esperanze, & passing the currents that run upon the said coast, on the Southeast part of Africa , between the said maine land & the Island of S. Laurence, otherwise called of the ancients, Madzo de Albuquerque, they did discover, people, and plant at Ceffala, being upon the East side of Africa , in the twenty degrees of latitude of the south Pole, and direct West from the Iland of S. Laurla, divers doe affirme that king Salomon did fetch his gold) as also upon the said East side of Africa , they did afterward discover, people, and plant at Mozambique , Quiola, Monbaza, and Melinde, to up to the streight of Babel-Mandell at the entring of the red sea, all upon the East coast of Africa , from whence they put off at the Cape of Guarda Fu, and past the great gulfe of Arabia , and
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Divers voyages made by Englishmen to the famous Citie of Mexico, and to all or most part of the other principall provinces, cities, townes and places throughout the great and large kingdom of New Spaine, even as farre as Nicaragua and Panama, & thence to Peru : together with a description of the Spaniards forme of government there: and sundry pleasant relations of the maners and customes of the natural inhabitants, and of the manifold rich commodities & strange rarities found in those partes of the continent: & other matters most worthy the observation. (search)
their Captaines and Masters, and of our trafique and dealing upon the coast of Africa . UPON munday the second of October 1567. the weather being reasonable faire, osaile, and departed from Plim mouth upon his intended voyage for the parts of Africa , and America , being accompanied with five other saile of ships, as namely then the eightenth day of the same moneth wee came to an ancker upon the coast of Africa , at Cape Verde in twelve fadome water; and here our Generall landed certaine or abode to depart with them, and such marchandize as hee had from the coast of Africa , towards the West Indies, and therefore commanded with all diligence to take iChap. 2. Wherein is showed the day and time of our departure from the coast of Africa , with the day and time of our arrivall in the West Indies, also of our trade, intment, upon the thirde day of Februarie 1568. wee departed from the coast of Africa , having the weather somewhat tempestuous, which made our passage the more hard
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A discourse written by one Miles Philips Englishman, one of the company put on shoare Northward of Panuco, in the West Indies by M. John Hawkins 1568. conteining many special things of that countrey and of the Spanish government, but specially of their cruelties used to our Englishmen, and amongst the rest to him selfe for the space of 15. or 16. yeres together, until by good and happy meanes he was delivered from their bloody hands, and returned into his owne Countrey. An. 1582. (search)
their Captaines and Masters, and of our trafique and dealing upon the coast of Africa . UPON munday the second of October 1567. the weather being reasonable faire, osaile, and departed from Plim mouth upon his intended voyage for the parts of Africa , and America , being accompanied with five other saile of ships, as namely then the eightenth day of the same moneth wee came to an ancker upon the coast of Africa , at Cape Verde in twelve fadome water; and here our Generall landed certaine or abode to depart with them, and such marchandize as hee had from the coast of Africa , towards the West Indies, and therefore commanded with all diligence to take iChap. 2. Wherein is showed the day and time of our departure from the coast of Africa , with the day and time of our arrivall in the West Indies, also of our trade, intment, upon the thirde day of Februarie 1568. wee departed from the coast of Africa , having the weather somewhat tempestuous, which made our passage the more hard
, with the number and names of the ships, their Captaines and Masters, and of our trafique and dealing upon the coast of Africa . UPON munday the second of October 1567. the weather being reasonable faire, our Generall M. John Hawkins, having commanppointed for Master Robert Barret, hoised saile, and departed from Plim mouth upon his intended voyage for the parts of Africa , and America , being accompanied with five other saile of ships, as namely the Mynion, wherein went for Captaine M. Johnf November, and holding on our course, upon the eightenth day of the same moneth wee came to an ancker upon the coast of Africa , at Cape Verde in twelve fadome water; and here our Generall landed certaine of our men, to the number of 160. or therea 500. Negros thought it best without longer abode to depart with them, and such marchandize as hee had from the coast of Africa , towards the West Indies, and therefore commanded with all diligence to take in fresh water and fewel, and so with speed
Chap. 2. Wherein is showed the day and time of our departure from the coast of Africa , with the day and time of our arrivall in the West Indies, also of our trade, and trafique there, and also of the great crueltie that the Spaniards used towards us, by the Vice-roy his direction, and appointment, falsifying his faith and promise given, and seeking to have intrapped us. ALL things being made in a readinesse, at our Generall his appointment, upon the thirde day of Februarie 1568. wee departed from the coast of Africa , having the weather somewhat tempestuous, which made our passage the more hard; and sayling so for the space of 52. dayes, upon the 27. of March 1568. we came in sight of an yland called Dominica , upon the coast of America in the West Indies, situated in 14. degrees of latitude, and 322. of longitude: from thence our Generall coasted from place to place, ever making trafique with the Spaniards and Indians as hee might, which was so
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
the keele of her. The 25 he came to Cape Blanco, which is upon the coast of Africa , and a place where the Portugals do ride, that fish there in the moneth of Novrs, for the time of their being there and for their fishing upon that coast of Africa , doe pay a certaine tribute to the king of the Moores. The people of that part of Africa are tawnie, having long haire without any apparell, saving before their privie members. Their weapons in warres are bowes and arrowes. The 26 we deparlso the next day we came to an anker at Quitangone a place on the main land of Africa , which is two or three leagues to the Northward of Mozambique, where the Portueete, I continued my purpose for the West Indies, and first for Cape Blanco in Africa upon the deserts of Libya . My last hope was to meete my lost ship, and withon of the most infectious serenas or dewes that fall all along these coasts of Africa , I caused my Master Abraham Kendall to shape his course directly for the isle
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage made by M. John Hawkins Esquire, and afterward knight, Captaine of the Jesus of Lubek, one of her Majesties shippes, and Generall of the Salomon, and other two barkes going in his companie, to the coast of Guinea, and the Indies of Nova Hispania, begun in An. Dom. 1564. (search)
ered, contrary to all mens expectations, both the pinnesse and the men sitting upon the keele of her. The 25 he came to Cape Blanco, which is upon the coast of Africa , and a place where the Portugals do ride, that fish there in the moneth of November especially, and is a very good place of fishing, for Pargoes, Mullet, and Doggir defence, but have rescue of the Barbarians, whom they entertaine as their souldiers, for the time of their being there and for their fishing upon that coast of Africa , doe pay a certaine tribute to the king of the Moores. The people of that part of Africa are tawnie, having long haire without any apparell, saving before their Africa are tawnie, having long haire without any apparell, saving before their privie members. Their weapons in warres are bowes and arrowes. The 26 we departed from S. Avis Baye, within Cape Blanco, where we refreshed our selves with fish, and other necessaries: and the 29 wee came to Cape Verde, which lieth in 14 degrees, and a halfe. These people are all blacke, and are called Negros, without any appare
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A briefe note of a voyage to the East Indies, begun the 10 of April 1591, wherein were three tall ships, the Penelope of Captaine Raimond, Admirall, the Merchant royall, whereof was Captaine, Samuel Foxcroft, Viceadmirall, the Edward Bonaventure, whereof was Captaine, M. James Lancaster, Rere-admirall, with a small pinnesse. Written by Henry May, who in his returne homeward by the West Indies, suffred shipwracke upon the isle of Bermuda , wherof here is annexed a large description. (search)
weyed anker, and that day we doubled the cape of Buona Speranza. The 12 following we were taken with an extreame tempest or huricano. This evening we saw a great sea breake over our admirall the Penelope, and their light strooke out: and after that we never saw them any more. In October following we in the Edward fell with the Westermost part of the isle of S. Laurence about midnight, knowing not where we were. Also the next day we came to an anker at Quitangone a place on the main land of Africa , which is two or three leagues to the Northward of Mozambique, where the Portugals of the isle of Mozambique fetch all their fresh water. Here we tooke a pangaia, with a Portugall boy in it; which is a vessell like a barge, with one matsaile of Coco nut leaves. The barge is sowed together with the rindes of trees, and pinned with woodden pinnes. In this pangaia we had certeine corne called millio, hennes, and some fardels of blew Calicut cloth. The Portugall boy we tooke with us, and dismi
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voyage of the honourable Gentleman M. Robert Duddeley, now knight, to the isle of Trinidad , and the coast of Paria: with his returne home by the Isles of Granata, Santa Cruz, Sant Juan de puerto rico, Mona , Zacheo, the shoalds called Abreojos, and the isle of Bermuda . In which voyage he and his company tooke and sunke nine Spanish ships, wherof one was an armada of 600 tunnes. Written at the request of M. Richard Hakluyt. (search)
The Intent, I made Benjamin Wood Captaine, in the other, one Captaine Wentworth. Thus cheared as a desolate traveller with the company of my small and newe erected Fleete, I continued my purpose for the West Indies, and first for Cape Blanco in Africa upon the deserts of Libya . My last hope was to meete my lost ship, and withall to renue my victuals upon the Canthers, which are Portugal fishermen: but the Canthers had bene so frighted by Frenchmen, as I could get none. Riding under this W tawny Moores, so wilde, as they would but call to my Caravels from the shore, who road very neere it. But not desirous to make any longer aboad in this place, by reason of the most infectious serenas or dewes that fall all along these coasts of Africa , I caused my Master Abraham Kendall to shape his course directly for the isle of Trinidad in the West Indies; which after 22. dayes we descried, and the first of February came to an anker under a point thereof called Curiapan, in a bay which wa
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The discoverie of the large, rich, and beautifull Empire of Guiana, with a relation of the great and golden citie of Manoa (which the Spaniards call El Dorado) and the provinces of Emeria, Aromaia, Amapaia, and other countries, with their rivers adjoyning. Performed in the yeere 1595 by Sir Walter Ralegh Knight, Captaine of Her Majesties Guard, Lorde Warden of the Stanneries, and Her Highnesse Lieutenant Generall of the Countie of Corne-wall. (search)
in the provinces of Topago, and their chiefest strengths and retracts are in the Islands situate on the South side of the entrance some 60 leagues within the mouth of the sayd river. The memories of the like women are very ancient aswell in Africa as in Asia : In Africa those that had Medusa for queene: others in Scithia nere the rivers of Tanais and Thermodon: we finde also that Lampedo & Marthesia were queenes of the Amazones: in many histories they are verified to have bene, and in dAfrica those that had Medusa for queene: others in Scithia nere the rivers of Tanais and Thermodon: we finde also that Lampedo & Marthesia were queenes of the Amazones: in many histories they are verified to have bene, and in divers ages and provinces: but they which are not far from Guiana doe accompany with men but once in a yere, and for the time of one moneth, which I gather by their relation, to be in April: and that time all kings of the borders assemble, and queenes of the Amazones; and after the queenes have chosen, the rest cast lots for their Valentines. This one moneth, they feast, dance, and drinke of their wines in abundance; and the Moone being done, they all depart to their owne provinces. If they con
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