Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for June 18th or search for June 18th in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 103 (search)
constantly skirmishing with the enemy for six days, and much of the time the rebels and ours occupying the summit of the same ridge within 30 yards of each other, firing constanly. During these six days skirmishing lost 4 men killed and 24 wounded. June 6, marched within three miles of Acworth and changed position from day to day with the brigade. When near Big Shanty, June 17, the skirmish line of the brigade became again heavily engaged with the enemy, driving him about a half mile. June 18, the skirmish line of the brigade, of which fifty men from this regiment formed a part, charged upon the enemy's rifle-pits and drove his skirmishers into the main line, capturing 13 prisoners, of whom the skirmishers of the Twenty-first took 7. The enemy that night abandoned his position and fell back to Kenesaw Mountain, and the regiment moved up and took position at that place. Here the movements are identical with those of the brigade, changing position as ordered from one part of the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 114 (search)
the enemy attacked the position, but were repulsed, with a loss to the battalion of 2 killed and 6 wounded. Was relieved from duty at this point on 2d of June, 1864. On the ensuing day relieved the First Battalion, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, on first line of the brigade. On the morning of the 5th of June the rebels were found to have again vacated their works in our front. Marched on 6th about seven miles toward Big Shanty. Camped in thick woods. The battalion was employed until the 18th of June in digging rifle-pits, supporting batteries, performing the usual guard and picket duties, and in moving nearer to the line of railroad between Acworth and. Marietta. The enemy having left their position in front of Kenesaw, the battalion, on the 19th, took position near Kenesaw Mountain. On 22d relieved a portion of Whitaker's brigade, Fourth Corps. Lay in breast-works at this point until the 27th, during which time the battalion lost 4 killed and 3 wounded. Moved to the left on 2d of
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 121 (search)
, but all the time subject to scattering shots and shell from the enemy. On the evening of the 2d of June I received orders from Colonel Scribner to relieve the Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, posted on the front line, which we did, and held that position under constant fire until the morning of the 5th of June, when the enemy evacuated. The regiment participated in the continual skirmishing that attended the advance of the brigade to its position at Kenesaw Mountain. On the 18th of June we were subject to a severe artillery fire during the attack on the enemy's first line of works. On the night of the 20th of June we were placed into position behind partially constructed works immediately to the right of Kenesaw Mountain. These works the men completed under the direction of line officers during the night, though harassed by a continual fire of musketry from the enemy's lines. During the afternoon of the 21st our position was subjected to the most terrific cannonadi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 129 (search)
went into position about 8 p. m. two miles southwest Big Shanty, remaining during the 12th and 13th. June 14, at 9 a. m. made reconnaissance toward Marietta road; Fourteenth Michigan Infantry, in advance as skirmishers, occupied the road and took up a strong position well in the advance, near Joel Bitt's house, remaining in same position during 15th and 16th. June 17, picket-line advanced (7 prisoners taken), the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, coming up into position on the right. June 18, at 4 p. m. brigade line advanced about one-half mile. June 19, early this morning the enemy's works in our front found to be vacated; command moved forward toward Kenesaw Mountain, the Sixtieth Illinois Infantry in the advance; deployed as skirmishers as they advanced; the rebels made stout resistance; they were steadily driven to the base and well up the mountain by the Sixtieth Illinois Infantry. It is no more than justice to say here that this is a fine regiment and ably commanded. Th
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 132 (search)
usy day and night; no casualties. June 13, occupying the same position as yesterday; slight skirmishing in front; no casualties. June 14, the regiment with brigade advanced about .a mile toward Kenesaw Mountain, and ,intrenched; rained. June 15, remained in same position; some skirmishing in front; constant firing away on our right; no casualties reported in command to-day, June 16, advanced the lines again last night; rained all day; the usual skirmishing going on; no casualties. June 17, 18, the regiment occupying the same position, and constant skirmishing in front. June 19, early this morning the command moved forward to the foot of Kenesaw under a heavy fire from the enemy's batteries on the crest of the mountain, no casualties occurring in the regiment. June 20, steady skirmishing in front; at noon the rebel batteries on Kenesaw again opened on our camp, shelling us heavily, but resulting in no damage to the regiment other than tearing of tents, &c. June 21, heavy fighting
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 134 (search)
nt to advance our lines, as this was the object of this movement. The skirmishers fol ght their way steadily forward, pressing back the rebel lines a long distance, and doing everything asked of them. In this operation we lost lightly, considering the ground taken, the whole loss being 1 killed and 3 wounded. Just before night sent back and brought up knapsacks and camp equipage, and pitched camp in a piece of woods in rear of front line, near Big Shanty Station. Lay here until the 18th. June 18, at 4 p. m. moved a half mile to the front toward Kenesaw Mountain and threw up earth-works. June 19, left our works at 7.50 a. m. and marched toward Kenesaw; halted at 9.30 a. m. and formed line of battle in front of rebel earth-works, where we remained until 11 a. m., when we moved on in a heavy rain-storm and formed in close column by division on a ridge three-quarters of a mile from Kenesaw. Just before night we moved slowly forward and formed in line of battle about forty rods from t
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 138 (search)
miles west of Big Shanty. June 7, 8, and 9, position unchanged. June 10, advanced line and faced due south. June 11, advanced line, and intrenched one and a half miles north of Kenesaw Mountain. June 12, affairs unchanged; skirmishing constant. June 13, advanced skirmish line and captured prisoners. June 14, moved to the left and intrenched on the WTestern and Atlantic Railroad, my left connecting with Sixteenth Army Corps. June 15, advanced skirmish line one-half mile. June 16, 17, and 18, no important change. June 19, main line advanced and intrenched at the base of Kenesaw Mountain. June 20, 21, 22, 23, and 24, position unchanged; all the time under a terrible fire of musketry and artillery; loss severe. June 25, relieved at midnight by a portion of General Harrow's division, Fifteenth Army Corps; marched to our right, and bivouacked at daylight. June 26, relained in camp. June 27, received orders to assault the enemy's works at 8 a. m. The ground over which the assaultin
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
itions held by his advanced parties, I steadily pushed forward my lines and at length established my artillery in positions highly advantageous and commanding. During this time the practice of our gunners had been skillful and effective. We were again close up to the rebel fortifications, and they were of great strength, constructed with extreme care and everywhere fully garnished with artillery. They were field-works, requiring the slow operations almost of a siege to approach them. June 18, having been instructed by the corps commander that Major-General Howard, with the Fourth Corps, intended to swing forward toward the left, so as to sweep along the enemy's line, I was at the same time ordered to conform to this movement and advance with those troops. My line of march was through a very difficult wood and morass nearly a mile in width, impassable for the artillery. It was, therefore, sent around by the left while the troops worked their way through the woods. Passing thi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Resaca. (search)
itions held by his advanced parties, I steadily pushed forward my lines and at length established my artillery in positions highly advantageous and commanding. During this time the practice of our gunners had been skillful and effective. We were again close up to the rebel fortifications, and they were of great strength, constructed with extreme care and everywhere fully garnished with artillery. They were field-works, requiring the slow operations almost of a siege to approach them. June 18, having been instructed by the corps commander that Major-General Howard, with the Fourth Corps, intended to swing forward toward the left, so as to sweep along the enemy's line, I was at the same time ordered to conform to this movement and advance with those troops. My line of march was through a very difficult wood and morass nearly a mile in width, impassable for the artillery. It was, therefore, sent around by the left while the troops worked their way through the woods. Passing thi
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 162 (search)
es; bivouacked near Burnt Church. June 7, moved eastward; cross railroad; pass through Acworth; bivouacked one and a half miles south of Acworth. June 10, regiment and brigade relieved from train guard; moved five miles on Marietta road; join our division. June 11, moved one mile to the left; bivouacked at midnight. June 12. move one-half mile to the left; halt in reserve line; heavy skirmishing in front; bivouacked for night. June 17, moved to the left toward Kenesaw; throw up works. June 18, advanced within a few hundred yards of the rebel works, having moved three-fourths of a mile; put up works. June 19, enemy having evacuated in the night, we move forward one and a half miles; bivouacked in second line for the night near Kenesaw. June 20, regiment on skirmish line; heavy firing all day. June 21, relieved from skirmish line and take position in first line of works. June 22, moved at dark short distance to the right; took up position in second line of works. June 26, move
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