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M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 7, line 557 (search)
r twice the conquerors of kings, First of all men, Pompeius' name except, Lay dead upon the field. But, Brutus, where, Where was thy sword? Plutarch states that Brutus after the battle escaped and made his way to Larissa, whence he wrote to Caesar. Caesar, pleased that he was alive, asked him to come to him; and it was on Brutus' opinion that Caesar determined to hurry to Egypt as the most probable refuge of Pompeius. Caesar entrusted Brutus with the command of Cisalpine Gaul when he was in Africa. Veiled by a common helm Unknown thou wanderest. Thy country's pride, Hope of the Senate, thou (for none besides); Thou latest scion of that race of pride, Whose fearless deeds the centuries record, Tempt not the battle, nor provoke the doom! Awaits thee on Philippi's fated field Thy Thessaly. Not here shalt thou prevail 'Gainst Caesar's life. Not yet hath he surpassed The height of power and deserved a death Noble at Brutus' hands-then let him live, Thy fated victim! There upon the field L
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 9, line 1 (search)
ts of the ruin wrought in Thrace. Who in such mighty navy had believed A host defeated sailed upon the main Thronging the sea with keels? Round Malea's cape And Taenarus open to the shades below And fair Cythera's isle, th' advancing fleet Sweeps o'er the yielding wave, by northern breeze Borne past the Cretan shores. But Phycus dared Refuse her harbour, and th' avenging hand Left her in ruins. Thus with gentle airs They glide along the main and reach the shore From Palinurus A promontory in Africa was so called, as well as that in Italy. named; for not alone On seas Italian, Pilot of the deep, Hast thou thy monument; and Libya too Claims that her tranquil harbours pleased thy soul. Then in the distance on the main arose The shining canvas of a stranger fleet, Or friend or foe they knew not. Yet they dread In every keel the presence of that chief Their fear-compelling conqueror. But in truth That navy tears and sorrow bore, and woes To make e'en Cato weep. For when in vain Cornelia pr
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 9, line 511 (search)
alone Until the humblest follower might drink Stood motionless. If for the truly good Is fame, and virtue by the deed itself, Not by successful issue, should be judged, Yield, famous ancestors! Fortune, not worth Gained you your glory. But such name as his Who ever merited by successful war Or slaughtered peoples? Rather would I lead With him his triumphs through the pathless sands And Libya's bounds, than in Pompeius' car Three times ascend the Capitol,1st. For his victories in Sicily and Africa, B.C. 81; 2nd. For the conquest of Sertorius, B.C. 71; 3rd. For his Eastern triumphs, B.C. 61. (Compare Book VIII., 953; VII., 16.) or break The proud Jugurtha.Over whom Marius triumphed. Rome! in him behold His country's father, worthiest of thy vows; A name by which men shall not blush to swear, Whom, shouldst thou break the fetters from thy neck, Thou mayst in distant days decree divine. Now was the heat more dense, and through that clime Than which no further on the Southern side The
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 9, line 839 (search)
The thirsty Dipsas and the horned snake ' Now wage the warfare. Rather let us seek ' That region by the horses of the sun ' Scorched, and the zone most torrid: let us fall 'Slain by some heavenly cause, and from the sky ' Descend our fate! Not, Africa, of thee ' Complain we, nor of Nature. From mankind ' Cut off, this quarter, teeming thus with pests ' She gave to snakes, and to the barren fields ' Denied the husbandman, nor wished that men 'Should perish by their venom. To the realms ' Of serhis serpent land ' There may we long, where yet some living thing ' Gives consolation. Not my native land ' Nor European fields I hope for now ' Lit by far other suns, nor Asia's plains. ' But in what land, what region of the sky, ' Where left we Africa? But now with frosts ' Cyrene stiffened: have we changed the laws ' Which rule the seasons, in this little space? ' Cast from the world we know, 'neath other skies ' And stars we tread; behind our backs the home ' Of southern tempests: Rome herse
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 10, line 194 (search)
know, 'Thy progress. Daring to upraise thy banks ''Gainst fiery Cancer's heat, thou tak'st thy rise 'Beneath the zenith: straight towards the north 'And mid Bootes flowing; to the couch 'Bending, or to the risings, of the sun 'In sinuous bends alternate; just alike 'To Araby's peoples and to Libyan sands. 'By Seres The Seres are, of course, the Chinese. The ancients seem to have thought that the Nile came from the east. But it is possible that there was another tribe of this name dwelling in Africa. first beheld, yet know they not Whence art thou come; and with no native stream Strik'st thou the Ethiop fields. Nor knows the world 'To whom it owes thee. Nature ne'er revealed 'Thy secret origin, removed afar. 'Nor did she wish thee to be seen of men ' While still a tiny rivulet, but preferred ' Their wonder to their knowledge. Where the sun ' Stays at his limit, dost thou rise in flood ' Untimely; such thy right: to other lands ' Bearing thy winter: and by both the poles ' Thou only
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The woorthy voiage of Richard the first, K. of England into Asia, for the recoverie of Jerusalem out of the hands of the Saracens, drawen out of the booke of Acts and Monuments of the Church of England, written by M. John Foxe. (search)
, for so oftentimes as he hath reviled, shall pay so many ounces of silver. Item, a thiefe or felon that hath stollen being lawfully convicted, shal have his head shorne, and boyling pitch powred upon his head, and feathers or downe strawed upon the same, whereby he may be knowen, and so at the first landing place they shall come to, there to be cast up. These things thus ordered, king Richard sending his Navie by the Spanish seas, and by the streights of Gibraltar , betweene Spaine and Africa , to meete him at Marsilia, hee himselfe went as is said to Vizeliac to the French king. Which two kings from thence went to Lions, where the bridge over the flood Rhodanus with preasse of people brake, and many both men and women were drowned: by occasion whereof the two kings for the combrance of their traines, were constrained to dissever themselves for time of their journey, appointing both to meet together in Sicily : and so Philip the French king tooke his way to Genua , and king Ric
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Historie is somewhat otherwise recorded by Froysard and Holenshed in manner following, pag. 473. (search)
ssels of the Genouois were ready to passe them over into Barbarie. And so about midsomer in the begining of the foureteenth yere of this kings reigne the whole army being embarked, sailed forth to the coast of Barbary, where neere to the city of Africa they landed: at which instant the English archers (as the Chronicles of Genoa write) stood all the company in good stead with their long bowes, beating backe the enemies from the shore, which came downe to resist their landing. After they had got to land, they invironed the city of Africa (called by the Moores Mahdia) with a strong siege: but at length, constrained with the intemperancy of the scalding ayre in that hot countrey, breeding in the army sundry diseases, they fell to a composition upon certaine articles to be performed in the behalfe of the Saracens: and so 61 dayes after their arrivall there they tooke the seas againe, and returned home, as in the histories of France and Genoa is likewise expressed. Where, by Polydore V
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of the king of England Henry the eight, to John king of Portugale, for a Portingale ship with the goods of John Gresham and Wil. Locke with others, unladen in Portugale from Chio. (search)
e, for a Portingale ship with the goods of John Gresham and Wil. Locke with others, unladen in Portugale from Chio. To the high and mighty prince, John by the grace of God, king of Portugale, and of Algarve on this side and beyond the sea in Africa , lord of Ghinea , and of the conquest, navigation, and traffique of Æthiopia, Arabia , Persia, India, &c. our most deere and welbeloved brother. Henry by the grace of God, king of England and of France, defender of the faith, and lord of Ireland: to John by the same grace, king of Portugale and Algarve , on this side and beyond the sea in Africa , and lord of Ghinea , and of the conquest, navigation, and traffique of Aethiopia, Arabia , Persia, India, &c. our most deare and welbeloved brother, sendeth greeting. So much ye more willingly and readily we undertake the recommending of all just causes unto your highnesse, because by the daily testimonie of our subjects which traffike in your kingdoms and dominions, we are informed, t
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Sir Thomas Chaloner to Alger with Charles the fift 1541, drawen out of his booke De Republica Anglorum instauranda. (search)
nda. THOMAS CHALONER was by birth a Londiner, by studie a Cantabrigian, by education a Courtier, by religion a devout and true Christian. Therefore after he had confirmed his youth and minde in the studies of good learning, when Sir Henry Knevet was sent ambassadour from the mighty Prince Henry the 8. to the Emperour Charles the fift, he went with him as his familiar friend, or as one of his Councell. At which time the said Charles the 5. passing over from Genoa and Corsica to Alger in Africa in warlike sort, with a mighty army by sea, that honorable Knevet the kings ambassadour, Thomas Chaloner, Henry Knolles, and Henry Isham, right worthy persons, of their owne accord accompanied him in that expedition, & served him in that warre, wherin Thomas Chaloner escaped most wonderfully with his life. For the gaily wherein he was, being either dashed against the rockes, or shaken with mighty stormes, and so cast away, after he had saved himselfe a long while by swimming, when his stren
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The charter of the privileges granted to the English, & the league of the great Turke with the Queenes Majestie in respect of traffique, dated in June 1580. (search)
ecca, that is to say, of Gods house, of Medina, of the most glorious and blessed Jerusalem, of the most fertile Egypt , Jemen and Jovan, Eden and Canaan , of Samnos the peaceable, and of Hebes, of Jabza, and Pazra, of Zeruzub and Halepia, of Caramaria and Diabekirvan, of Dulkadiria, of Babylon, and of all the three Arabias, of the Euzians and Georgians, of Cyprus the rich, and of the kingdomes of Asia, of Ozakior, of the tracts of the white and blacke Sea, of Grecia and Mesopotamia , of Africa and Goleta, of Alger , and of Tripolis in the West, of the most choise and principall Europe, of Buda and Temeswar, and of the kingdomes beyond the Alpes , and many others such like, most mightie Murad Can, the sonne of the Emperour Zelim Can, which was the sonne of Zoleiman Can, which was the sonne of Zelim Can, which was the sonne of Paiizid Can, which was the sonne of Mehemed Can, &c. We most mightie prince Murad Can, in token of our Imperiall friendship, doe signifie and declare, that
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