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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harney, William Selby 1798-1889 (search)
Harney, William Selby 1798-1889 Military officer; born in Louisiana in 1798; entered the army while quite young; was in the Black Hawk War; and was made lieutenant-colonel of dragoons in 1836. Ten years later he was colonel. He served in the Florida, or Seminole, War (q. v.), and in the war with Mexico. In 1848 he was brevetted brigadier-general for his services in the battle of Cerro Gordo (q. v.). He was promoted to brigadiergeneral in 1858, and placed in command of the Department of Or1798; entered the army while quite young; was in the Black Hawk War; and was made lieutenant-colonel of dragoons in 1836. Ten years later he was colonel. He served in the Florida, or Seminole, War (q. v.), and in the war with Mexico. In 1848 he was brevetted brigadier-general for his services in the battle of Cerro Gordo (q. v.). He was promoted to brigadiergeneral in 1858, and placed in command of the Department of Oregon; and in July. 1859, took possession of the island of San Juan, near Vancouver, which England claimed to be a part of British Columbia, and which the United States soon afterwards evacuated. Harney then commanded the Department of the West; and in April. 1861, while on his way to Washington, he was arrested by the Confederates at Harper's Ferry, Va., and taken to Richmond. He was soon released, and, on returning to St. Louis, issued proclamations warning the people of Missouri of the dange
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Harris, George, Lord -1829 (search)
Harris, George, Lord -1829 Military officer; born March 18, 1746; became captain in 1771, and came to America in 1775. He was in the skirmish at Lexington and was wounded in the battle of Bunker Hill. In the battles of Long Island, Harlem Plains, and White Plains, and in every battle in which General Howe, Sir Henry Clinton, and Earl Cornwallis, in the North, participated, until late in 1778, he was an actor. Then he went on an expedition to the West Indies; served under Byron off Grenada in 1779; also, afterwards, in India, and in 1798 was made governor of Madras, and placed at the head of the army against Tippoo Sultan, capturing Seringapatam, for which service he received public thanks and promotion. In 1812 he was raised to the peerage. He died in Belmont, Kent, England, May 19, 1829.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hawks, Francis Lister 1798-1866 (search)
Hawks, Francis Lister 1798-1866 Clergyman; born in Newbern, N. C., June 10, 1798; graduated at the University of North Carolina in 1815; ordained in the Protestant Episcopal Church in 1827: was a noted preacher, and held pastorates in important churches, including St. Thomas's in New York City, of which he was rector in 1831-43. He was the author of Reports of cases adjudged in the Supreme Court of North Carolina; Contributions to the ecclesiastical history of the United States of America: vol. i., On the early Church in Virginia; vol. II., On the Church in Maryland; Commentary on the Constitution and canons of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States; History of North Carolina, etc. He was also editor of State papers of Gen. Alexander Hamilton; Perry's expedition to the China seas and Japan; vols. i. and II. of the Documentary history of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States (with Rev. William S. Perry), etc. He died in New York City, Sept. 26, 1
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hayne, Robert young -1839 (search)
islature, the whole subject was deliberately re-examined, and the objections urged against the Virginia doctrines carefully considered. The result was that the legislature of Virginia reaffirmed all the principles laid down in the resolutions of 1798, and issued to the world that admirable report which has stamped the character of Mr. Madison as the preserver of that Constitution which he had contributed so largely to create and establish. I will here quote from Mr. Madison's report one or twon of powers. Between these two evils, when we must make a choice, there can be no hesitation. Such, sir, are the high and imposing authorities in support of the Carolina doctrine, which is, in fact, the doctrine of the Virginia Resolutions of 1798. Sir, at that day the whole country was divided on this very question. It formed the line of demarcation between the Federal and Republican parties; and the great political revolution which then took place turned upon the very question involv
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hicks, Thomas Holliday 1798-1865 (search)
Hicks, Thomas Holliday 1798-1865 Statesman; born in Dorchester county, Md., Sept. 2, 1798; was a farmer in early life; was often in the State legislature, and was governor of the commonwealth from 1858 to 1862. He was elected to the United States Senate in 1862, for the unexpired term of a deceased Senator, and re-elected for the term ending in 1867. When the Civil War broke out, Governor Hicks stood firmly for the Union. He declared, in a proclamation after the attack on the Massachusetts regiment in Baltimore Thomas Holliday Hicks. (April 19, 1861), that all his authority would be exercised in support of the government (see Baltimore). By his patriotism and firmness, Maryland was saved from attempting secession from the Union. He died in Washington, D. C., Feb. 13, 1865.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hinman, Elisha 1734-1807 (search)
Hinman, Elisha 1734-1807 Naval officer; born in Stonington, Conn., March 9, 1734; went to sea at the age of fourteen years, and was a captain at nineteen, sailing to Europe and the Indies. He entered the navy of the Revolution, under Hopkins, in 1776, and was one of the first captains appointed by Congress. He was a very active officer. Captured when in command of the Alfred, thirty-two guns, he was taken to England, whence he escaped to France, and cruised successfully after his return, in 1779-80. President Adams offered him the command of the Constitution in 1798, but on account of his age he declined. From that time until 1802 he was engaged in the revenue service. He died in Stonington, Aug. 29, 1807.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Holmes, Abiel 1763-1837 (search)
Holmes, Abiel 1763-1837 Clergyman; born in Woodstock, Conn., Dec. 24, 1763; graduated at Yale College in 1783; tutor there in 1786 and 1787; was pastor of a church in Georgia from 1785 to 1791; and of the First Church, Cambridge, from 1792 to 1832. He prepared and published, in 2 octavo volumes, very valuable Annals of America, closing in 1826. He also published a Life of his father-in-law, President Stiles (1798); a Memoir of the French Protestants; A history of Cambridge; and many sermons. He died in Cambridge, Mass., June 4, 1837.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Howard, John eager 1752-1827 (search)
outhern Department. In Gates's defeat, near Camden, he participared, and he led the Continental infantry in the battle of the Cowpens, at one time holding in his hands the swords of seven surrendered British officers. For his conduct there Congress voted him a silver medal. It was the first occasion during the Revolutionary War in which the bayonet was effectively used. He was distinguished in the battles of Guildford, Hobkirk's Hill, and Eutaw Springs, and was severely wounded in the latter engagement After the war he married a daughter of Chief-Justice Chew, of Pennsylvania He was a member of Congress (1787-88), and governor of Maryland from 1789 to 1792. Colonel Howard was a member of the Maryland Senate in 1795, and United States Senator from 1796 to 1803. He was named by Washington for one of his brigadier-generals in 1798. When Baltimore was threatened in 1814, Howard placed himself at the head of aged men armed for its defence. He died in Baltimore county, Oct. 12, 1827.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hull, Isaac 1775-1845 (search)
Hull, Isaac 1775-1845 Naval officer; born in Derby, Conn., March 9, 1775; nephew of Gen. William Hull; when nineteen years old he commanded a merchant ship which sailed to London; entered the navy as lieutenant in 1798, and rose to captain in 1806. He was in the Constitution, and distinguished himself in the West Indies and in the Mediterranean. He sailed in the Constitution in July, 1812, and had a remarkable chase by a British squadron (see U. S. S. Constitution). In August he encountered the Guerriere, and made her a captive. For this exploit Congress voted him a gold medal. Afterwards he was a naval commissioner, and commodore of the navy-yards at Boston, Portsmouth, and Washington. He served in the American navy, afloat and ashore, thirty-seven years, and died in Philadelphia, Feb. 13, 1845. His remains rest in Laurel Hill Cemetery, and over them is a beautiful altar-tomb of Italian marbleā€”a copy of the tomb of Scipio Barbatus at Rome. It is chastely ornamented, and s
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hull, William 1753-1825 (search)
nel in 1779; and soon afterwards to colonel. Isaac Hull's monument. Hull practised law with reputation at Newton after the war, was a leading member of the Massachusetts legislature in both houses, and was a noted man in wealth and reputation in that State when he became major-general of militia. He commanded a portion of the troops which suppressed Shays's rebellion (see Shays, Daniel). In 1793 he was a commissioner to Canada to treat with the Indians; and on his return from Europe, in 1798, he was made a judge of the court of common pleas. From 1805 to 1812 he was governor of Michigan Territory, where, after Wm. Hull. a fruitless and brief campaign for the invasion of Canada, as commander of the Army of the Northwest, he was compelled to surrender Detroit and the Territory into the possession of the British. For this act he was tried by court-martial, sentenced to death, pardoned by the President, and afterwards published such a thorough vindication of his conduct that his
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