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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2, V. List of Medical officers in Massachusetts Regiments. (search)
8, 1863. Mann, Cyrus S. First Lieutenant, Assistant Surgeon, 31st Mass. Infantry, Oct. 10, 1863. Discharged (disability), Mar. 25, 1864. Marcy, Henry Orlando. First Lieutenant, Assistant Surgeon, 43d Infantry, M. V. M., in service of the U. S., May 5, 1863. Mustered out, July 30, 1863. Major, Surgeon, 35th U. S. Colored Infantry, Nov. 26, 1863. See United States Colored Troops. Martin, Oramel. Major, Surgeon, 3d Battalion Riflemen, M. V. M., in service of the U. S., Apr. 19, 1861; mustered, May 19, 1861. Mustered out, Aug. 3, 1861. Major, Brig. Surgeon, U. S. Volunteers, Aug. 3, 1861. See United States Army. Mason, Augustus. First Lieutenant, Assistant Surgeon, 43d Infantry, M. V. M., in service of the U. S., Nov. 5, 1862. Resigned, Mar. 17, 1863. Mason, Edward Bromfield. First Lieutenant, Assistant Surgeon, 14th Mass. Infantry (afterward 1st Mass. Heavy Artillery), Mar. 1, 1862. Second Lieutenant, 2d Mass. Cavalry, June 4, 1863. See Massachusett
Born at Warren, Worcester County, Mass., Apr. 13, 1833. Private, 71st N. Y. State Militia, Apr. 19, 1861. Discharged, July 30, 1861. First Lieutenant, 43d N. Y. Infantry, Dec. 16, 1861. Captain afficers. Chamberlain, William D. Born in Massachusetts. Captain, 29th Mass. Infantry, Apr. 19, 1861. Captain, Commissary of Subsistence, U. S. Volunteers, Apr. 7, 1864. Brevet Major, U. S. Voom Massachusetts. Major, Surgeon, 3d Battalion Riflemen, M. V. M., in service of the U. S., Apr. 19, 1861; mustered, May 19, 1861. Mustered out, Aug. 3, 1861. Major, Brigade Surgeon, U. S. Volunterentiss. Born in Massachusetts. Captain, 3d Infantry, M. V. M., in service of the U. S., Apr. 19, 1861; mustered, Apr. 23, 1861. Mustered out, July 22, 1861. Captain, 38th Mass. Infantry, Aug.est Hilliare. Born in Maryland. Private, 6th Infantry, M. V. M , in service of the U. S, Apr. 19, 1861, to Aug. 3, 1861. Corporal, 26th Mass. Infantry, Sept. 7, 1861. Second Lieutenant, 2d La. I
. Barrett, Samuel Eddy. Born at Cambridgeport, Mass., May 16, 1834. First Lieutenant, 1st Ill. Light Artillery, Apr. 19, 1861. Senior First Lieutenant, May, 1861. Mustered out, July 16, 1861. Senior First Lieutenant, 1st Ill. Light Artillery,rroughs, George Tyler. Born at Warren, Worcester County, Mass., Apr. 13, 1833. Private, 71st N. Y. State Militia, Apr. 19, 1861. Discharged, July 30, 1861. First Lieutenant, 43d N. Y. Infantry, Dec. 16, 1861. Captain and Commissary of SubsisteSee General Officers. Pratt, Henry. Born at North Chelsea, Mass., Aug. 16, 1838. Private, 12th N. Y. Infantry, Apr. 19, 1861. Mustered out, Aug. 5, 1861. First Lieutenant, 89th N. Y. Infantry, Sept. 15, 1861. Captain, Nov. 11, 1862. Resign, 1865. Wardwell, Ernest Hilliare. Born in Maryland. Private, 6th Infantry, M. V. M., in service of the U. S., Apr. 19. 1861, to Aug. 3, 1861. Corporal, 26th Mass. Infantry, Sept. 7, 1861. Second Lieutenant, 2d La. Infantry, Dec. 21, 1862.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2, XIV. Massachusetts women in the civil war. (search)
was a teacher in her early life, in which profession she had a remarkable but very arduous career. Failing in health, she sought recuperation in Washington, and when she became convalescent a friend obtained an appointment for her in the patent office, which she held for three years. She was the first and at that time the only woman employed in the governmental departments at Washington. She was in that city when about thirty of the wounded men who were victims of the Baltimore mob of April 19, 1861, were carried to the Washington Infirmary for surgical treatment and nursing. Miss Barton proceeded promptly to the spot, a few hours after Miss Dix had begun her humane work among these sufferers of the Sixth Massachusetts Infantry, and remained at her post till the men were able to leave the hospital. This was her induction into the immense work she performed during the war, which cannot even be epitomized here, it was so varied and extensive. Her work and its fame grew apace, and
1863. Proceedings in the legislature upon the act of the state of Maryland appropriating $7,000 for the families of those belonging to the 6th Regiment of Mass. Volunteers, who were killed or disabled by wounds in the riot at Baltimore, Apr. 19, 1861. Boston, 1862. 8°. Record of the Mass. Volunteers, 1861-65. Published by the adjutant-general. Boston, 1868-70. 2 v. 4°. Register and military record, 1862. Boston, 1862. 8°. Reports of the adjutant-general, with reports fHistory of the 5th Regiment Infantry, M. V. M. Boston, 1879. 8°. 6th Regiment. Andrew, John A. Address on dedicating the monument to Ladd and Whitney at Lowell. Boston, 1863. 31 pp. 8°. — Brown, George William. Baltimore and the 19th of April, 1861. A study of the war. Baltimore, 1887. 8°. — Hanson, John W. Historical sketch of the old 6th Regiment of Mass. Volunteers during its three campaigns in 1861-64. Boston, 1866. 16°. — Watson, B. F. An oration delivered at Lowel
, in issue of April 17. Boston Evening Journal, April 19, 1861, p. 2, col. 1. — Massachusetts' first call f vol. 5, p. 109. Baltimore, Md. Affair of April 19, 1861. Attack upon men of 6th Regt. M. V. M.; officiicians of 6th Regt. M. V. M. in Baltimore, Md., April 19, 1861. Boston Evening Journal, April 22, 1861, p. 2, . 2, col. 2. — – Attacked in Baltimore, Md., April 19, 1861. First despatches. Boston Evening Journal, Apr – Farewell in Boston. Boston Evening Journal, April 19, 1861, p. 4, cols. 4-5. — – In New York. Boston E, in issue of April 17. Boston Evening Journal, April 19, 1861, p. 2, col. 1. —Advertisement asking subscri, action of banks, etc. Boston Evening Journal, April 19, 1861, p. 4, cols. 1, 5, 6. —About first advance oicians of 6th Regt. M. V. M. in Baltimore, Md., April 19, 1861; short. Boston Evening Journal, April 23, 1861icians of 6th Regt. M. V. M. in Baltimore, Md., April 19, 1861. Boston Evening Journal, April 22, 186
Office kept at the Lamb Tavern, Oct. 11, 1786 Building, in Court square, completed, 1844 Regiment, Mass returned from the Mexican War, July 26, 1848 6th. Left Boston for Washington, Apr. 17, 1861 A critical time at Baltimore, Apr. 19, 1861 Three months men returned home, Aug. 1, 1861 Again went South, from Boston, Sep. 8, 1862 Again returned home from the war, Apr. 21, 1864 3d. Went from Boston, South, to the war, Apr. 21, 1861 Three months men returned home, Jull, May 25, 1864 Regiment Mass. 2d. Went from Boston, South, to the war, July 8, 1861 Arrived home from the war, Jan. 20, 1864 4th. Arrived in Boston, from the war, July 19, 1861 8th. Went South, to the war, through Boston, Apr. 19, 1861 9th. Went from Boston, South, to the war, June 25, 1861 Arrived home from the war, June 11, 1864 10th. Went from Boston, South, to the war, July 25, 1861 11th. Went from Boston, South, to the war, June 29 1861 Arrived home f
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: Maryland under Federal military power. (search)
ounced for breaking railroads or canals; for belonging to any secret club intended to encourage the secession of the State from the Union; for displaying secession flags, encouraging any minor to go South and join in the rebellion, or furnishing any minor or any other person with money, clothes, provisions or conveyance to aid in such an object. It also appropriated $7,000 for the relief of the families of those soldiers of the Sixth Massachusetts regiment who were killed in the riot of April 19, 1861. It made no provision for the families of those citizens of Maryland who were killed by the soldiers. Loyalty could not further go. When President Lincoln, on the 14th of April, 1861, called for seventy-five thousand volunteers to suppress the rebellion, he required Maryland to furnish four regiments of four hundred and eighty men each as her quota. But on the 20th, the day after the Baltimore attack on the Massachusetts troops, Governor Hicks wrote him that he thought it prudent (
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: the Maryland Line. (search)
use with the same devotion, to-day we should have been free from Yankee thralldom. I have ordered the brigade to return to their homes, and it behooves us now to separate. With my warmest wishes for your welfare, and a hearty God bless you, I bid you farewell. Thomas T. Munford, Brigadier-General Commanding Division. And so closes the record of the Maryland Line in the army of the Confederate States. It is inscribed on the pages of the history of the army of Northern Virginia. It fired the first gun in the Seven Days battles. It fired the first gun in Early's advance into Maryland in 1864, when he crossed the Potomac at Shepherdstown, and the last, when he recrossed at Poolesville. It struck the first blow and shed the first blood of the revolution in Baltimore on the 19th of April, 1861, and made the last charge at Appomattox, April 9, 1865. Future generations of Marylanders will be proud of its achievements, and in the South I hope its memory will be honored and loved.
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
eutenancy in the Second Dragoons. He served on frontier duty in the United States army; on the march through Texas to Austin in 1848-49, and remained on duty at various garrisons in Texas until 1855, when he was promoted first-lieutenant First cavalry, March 3d, and captain December 20th. Subsequently he was engaged in garrison duty in Kansas, Nebraska and Colorado, in the Cheyenne expedition of 1856, the Utah expedition of 1848, and the Comanche expedition of 1860. Immediately after April 19, 1861, he resigned his commission, and going to Richmond, was commissioned captain of cavalry in the regular army of the Confederate States. Upon the formation of the First regiment, Maryland infantry, he was appointed lieutenant-colonel of that command, and by special good conduct won the commendation of Gen. J. E. Johnston in orders. He was with the regiment under Colonel Elzey during its distinguished service at the first battle of Manassas, and at the promotion of Elzey, Steuart was comm
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