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r Confederate Independence will be fought early next spring, probably near Branchville, South Carolina, and, at all events, somewhere on the single and all important line of railway from Kingsville to Augusta. For four years the enemy has sought in vain to overrun the country from the Ohio and the Potomac, and to defeat us in battle. Henceforth his policy will be to operate from the sea, by short lines, against our railways. This, Grant is now doing; and such will be the future policy of Sherman. Having failed to take Richmond by marching overland, Grant now hopes to effect its fall by cutting off its supplies. The time has come, therefore, for the President and General Lee to elevate their telescopes and take a wider view of the situation. Sallust. Proclamation of the Governor of North Carolina. Whereas, the long-expected attack upon our only remaining seaport is now about to be made, and our State is also likely to be invaded at other points by an enemy to whom m
however, about six hundred more troops were sent to their aid. By its fall we lost between seven and eight hundred men. The fort was attacked on the north side by Sherman's forces. No particulars of the fight have, as yet, been received. It is known, however, that no attack was made on the south, or water side. It is also now known if the fort had been as strong on the land side as it was on the water side, it never could have been captured. After Sherman captured the fort he communicated with the fleet and procured a bountiful supply of ammunition — an article which he was deprived of by Providence in Atlanta.--Sherman also transferred the heavy guns frSherman also transferred the heavy guns from Fort McAllister to a position from which he could shell the city in case he wished to. "No demand was made for the surrender of the city until Saturday. On that day he demanded the unconditional surrender of the city. General Beauregard, in substance, informed him that 'he knew the way to the city and could take it if he
A sketch of Sherman. --The following sketch of William Tecumseh Sherman, who is at present attracting something of the public attention, we find in the Baltimore American: Major-General William Tecumseh Sherman is the full name of the hero who has marched upon Savannah. He was born in Lancaster, Ohio, in 1820; his fatheWilliam Tecumseh Sherman, who is at present attracting something of the public attention, we find in the Baltimore American: Major-General William Tecumseh Sherman is the full name of the hero who has marched upon Savannah. He was born in Lancaster, Ohio, in 1820; his father, Honorable Charles R. Sherman, one of the Justices of the Ohio Supreme Court, and eider brother of Senator Sherman. He was educated in the family of the Honorable Thomas Ewing, the distinguished lawyer, whose daughter he married, becoming brother-in-law to the now General Thomas Ewing. At sixteen he entered, and in 1840 grMajor-General William Tecumseh Sherman is the full name of the hero who has marched upon Savannah. He was born in Lancaster, Ohio, in 1820; his father, Honorable Charles R. Sherman, one of the Justices of the Ohio Supreme Court, and eider brother of Senator Sherman. He was educated in the family of the Honorable Thomas Ewing, the distinguished lawyer, whose daughter he married, becoming brother-in-law to the now General Thomas Ewing. At sixteen he entered, and in 1840 graduated from. West Point. In 1841 be was stationed at Fort Moultrie, Charleston; in 1818 he took charge of the banking-house of Lucas, Turner & Co., San Francisco, and in 1860 was President of the State Military Academy of Louisiana--a post which he resigned on the first indication of secession. declaring to Governor Moors that
General Sherman and Savannah. Accounts of refugees from Savannah, heretofore published in this paper, concur in stating that General Sherman has publicly declared that he may not be able to restrain his troops when he invades South Carolina, aGeneral Sherman has publicly declared that he may not be able to restrain his troops when he invades South Carolina, and he does not know that he shall attempt to. Every-one knows what the rank and file of invading armies are most composed of. They are, in general, the refuse of society, the scum of the nations, outcasts, outlaws and Pariahs of the earth. Ever of old and young from one end of South Carolina to the other. That is what it means; nothing more, nothing less. General Sherman need not say that he cannot restrain his troops.--If he cannot, he is unfit for his position. Any general, who chooses, has at his disposal ample means of enforcing discipline and good behavior. When Sherman intimates his doubts whether he shall attempt to restrain his soldiers, he gives us the only reason why he cannot. It remains to be seen whether our o
ssamer; and without taking a single vessel from our blockade to sink every ship in the British navy, as if they were but cockleshell. Yet we will have little or no trouble to put Englishmen on their better behavior. Whatever does not seriously damage us, we let pass with a scornful word or two; whatever does seriously damage us, we quietly reserve for further settlement." These little straws indicate the direction of the tide. The army, the navy and the press of the United States are all clamorous for a set-to with honest John. Sherman threatens Hyde Park; Porter and the Kearsarge are eager to sink British ships; the Tribune will brush away Canada like gossamer. In the meantime, Mr. Bull stands hat in hand, bows politely at every fresh tweak of his nose, and protests that he had no intention of giving offence. It makes us melancholy to behold our venerable grandson thus humiliated. We propose that the Confederacy offer its mediation between England and the United States.
y afternoon by special train from Parkersburg. General Sheridan is a small, thick-set man, apparently about thirty two or thirty-three years of age, and wears a light moustache and goatee." Mr. Deshler, Treasurer of the Sherman Testimonial Fund, in a note to the Ohio State Journal, says the first contribution (after General Grant's) was made by a widow lady, who, as she presented her twenty-five dollars, remarked that, "as a friend and neighbor, she was present at the birth of William Tecumseh Sherman, and put upon him his first clothes." A young girl, named Deacon, belonging to Newcastle, New Hampshire, was making her bridal dress one evening last week, when a lighted kerosene lamp beside her was overturned upon her clothes, burning her so fearfully that she died on Thursday. Charles Summer declined the invitation of the Massachusetts Legislature to deliver a eulogy on the life and character of the late Edward Everett. Ladies with Southern sympathies, in Washingto
the capture of Fort Fisher, when discovering that some important change, he knew not then what, had occurred in the military situation, her commander (Captain Maffit) put to sea, and made good his escape. He touched the South Carolina coast and put ashore a messenger with dispatches, who has reached this city.--The news, if any, brought by this messenger has not been made public. From South Carolina. Information received from South Carolina yesterday morning is to the effect that Sherman's infantry, with their wagon trains, are camped near Ennis's Cross-roads, on the road leading towards Grahamsville, and on the road running towards Sister's ferry. A reconnoitering force was reported within four miles of Robertsville, which is fifty miles north of Savannah and five miles east of the Savannah river. A small force of Yankees landed on Little Brittain island, near Legares, Saturday night, but were driven off. Official reports. General Hardee telegraphs that the en
William Tecumseh Sherman is the full name of the new military lion of the North. It must have been a prophetic instinct that induced his father to name the future desolator of Georgia after the most noted Indian chief employed by the British in the late war. Our readers remember the old doggerel,-- "Rumpsey Dumpsey, Colonel Johnson killed Tecumseh." Perhaps his namesake may meet the same fate at the hands of General Johnston.
Department of North Carolina7,500 Department of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida, opposing Sherman3,000 Department of Eastern Georgia, opposing Sherman11,500 Department of Alabama, MississippiSherman11,500 Department of Alabama, Mississippi and Eastern Louisiana14,000 District of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona5,000 District of West Louisiana3,000 Garrison of forts on coast5,000 Grand total168,950 Release of Prisoners held for Rrebeldom. While the country was in expectancy and anxiety concerning the movements of General Sherman in Georgia, a rebel courier was captured near Morganzia Louisiana, with a duplicate of an oYork was agitated on Sunday morning by the report that the city of Charleston had fallen before Sherman, and that an arrangement for the immediate attainment of peace had been agreed upon between Linr, near Johnsonville, on last Thursday. North Carolina has been added to the department of Sherman, and Ohio to that of Thomas. The Charlotte, Blenheim and Stagg, all blockade runners, have
ith Messrs. Stephens, Hunter and Campbell was entirely without foundation.--The latest news we have received from the North is through the Yankee papers of last Monday, which were published before the news had reached there of the appointment of our commissioners.--Besides, there is no reason to suppose any persons will be specially appointed to confer with our commissioners, who went on to see Mr. Lincoln himself. From the South. No official intelligence from the South relative to Sherman's movements was made public on yesterday. There was a report in semi-official circles that he was moving a column on Augusta, along the south bank, or Georgia side, of the Savannah river. From this and other reports, which, within the past week, have reached us from Charleston, we think it most probable that he is menacing both Augusta and Branchville. If his army be as great as the Yankee press represent it, he can send columns of twenty-five thousand men against each place.-- Of our p
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