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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of the Susan of London to Constantinople, wherein the worshipfull M. William Harborne was sent first Ambassadour unto Sultan Murad Can, the great Turke, with whom he continued as her Majesties Ligier almost sixe yeeres. (search)
de, tolde us that they did see the Captaine, and other gentlemen of the Iland, having their buskins and stockings torne from their legges, with labouring in the bushes day and night to make that sudden provision. The 12 of February we saw an Iland of Africa side called Galata, where they use to drag out of the Sea much Corall, and we saw likewise Sardinia , which is an Iland subject to Spaine. The 13 in the morning we were hard by Sardinia . The 15 we did see an Iland neere Sicilia , and an Iland on Africa side called Cysimbre. The same day likewise we saw an Iland called Pantalaria, and that night we were thwart the middle of Sicilia . The 16 at night we were as farre as Capo Passaro, which is the Southeast part of Sicilia . The 24 we were put into a port called Porto de Conte, in an Iland called Cephalonia : it is an out Iland in the dominions of Grecia , and now at this present governed by the Signory of Venice, as the rest of Grecia is under the Turke, for the most part. The 27
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage made to Tripolis in Barbarie, in the yeere 1583. with a ship called the Jesus, wherein the adventures and distresses of some Englishmen are truely reported, and other necessary circumstances observed. Written by Thomas Sanders. (search)
Gods permission should goe for Tripolis in Barbarie, that is to say, first from Portsmouth to Newhaven in Normandie , from thence to S. Lucar, otherwise called Saint Lucas in Andeluzia, and from thence to Tripolie, which is in the East part of Africa , and so to returne unto London. But here ought every man to note and consider the workes of our God, that many times what man doth determine God doth disappoint. The said master having some occasion to goe to Farmne, tooke with him the Pilot andre also forceably and most violently shaven, head and beard, and within three dayes after, I and sixe more of my fellowes, together with fourescore Italians and Spaniards were sent foorth in a Galeot to take a Greekish Carmosell, which came into Africa to steale Negroes, and went out of Tripolis unto that place, which was two hundred and fourtie leagues thence, but wee were chained three and three to an oare, and wee rowed naked above the girdle, and the Boteswaine of the Galley walked abaft t
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A description of the yeerely voyage or pilgrimage of the Mahumitans, Turkes and Moores unto Mecca in Arabia . (search)
A description of the yeerely voyage or pilgrimage of the Mahumitans, Turkes and Moores unto Mecca in Arabia . ALEXANDRIA the most ancient citie in Africa situated by the seaside containeth seven miles in circuite, and is environed with two walles one neere to the other with high towers, but the walles within be farre higher then those without, with a great ditch round about the same: yet is not this Citie very strong by reason of the great antiquitie, being almost halfe destroyed and ruinated. The greatnesse of this Citie is such, that if it were of double habitation, as it is compassed with a double wall, it might be truely said, that there were two Alexandrias one builded upon another, because under the foundations of the saide City are great habitations, and incredible huge pillers. True it is, that this part underneath remaineth at this day inhabitable, because of the corrupt aire, as also for that by time, which consumeth all things, it is greatly ruinated. It might well b
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A description of the fortunate Ilands, otherwise called the Ilands of Canaria, with their strange fruits and commodities: composed by Thomas Nicols English man, who remained there the space of seven yeeres together. (search)
barley meale and goates milke, called Gofia, which they use at this day, and thereof I have eaten divers times, for it is accounted exceeding holesome. Touching the originall of these people some holde opinion, that the Romans which dwelt in Africa exiled them thither, aswell men as women, their tongues being cut out of their heads, for blasphemy against the Romane gods. But howsoever it were, their language was speciall, and not mixed with Romane speech or Arabian. This Iland is now, and is very good meat. This Iland standeth in 26 degrees, and is in length twelve leagues. The Ile of Forteventura.THE Ile of Forteventura standeth fifty leagues from the promontory of Cabo de Guer, in the firme land of Africa , and foure & twenty leagues distant from Canaria Estward. This Iland doth appertaine to the lord of Lanzarota. It is reasonable fruitfull of wheat and barley, and also of kine, goats, and orchel: this Ile is fifteene leagues long and ten leagues
y were clothed in goat skinnes made like unto a loose cassocke, they dwelt in caves in the rocks, in great amity and brotherly love. They spake all one language: their chiefe feeding was gelt dogges, goates, and goates milke, their bread was made of barley meale and goates milke, called Gofia, which they use at this day, and thereof I have eaten divers times, for it is accounted exceeding holesome. Touching the originall of these people some holde opinion, that the Romans which dwelt in Africa exiled them thither, aswell men as women, their tongues being cut out of their heads, for blasphemy against the Romane gods. But howsoever it were, their language was speciall, and not mixed with Romane speech or Arabian. This Iland is now the principallest of all the rest, not in fertility, but by reason it is the seat of justice and government of all the residue. This Iland hath a speciall Governour for the Iland onely, yet notwithstanding there are three Judges called Auditours, wh
The Ile of Forteventura.THE Ile of Forteventura standeth fifty leagues from the promontory of Cabo de Guer, in the firme land of Africa , and foure & twenty leagues distant from Canaria Estward. This Iland doth appertaine to the lord of Lanzarota. It is reasonable fruitfull of wheat and barley, and also of kine, goats, and orchel: this Ile is fifteene leagues long and ten leagues broad. On the North side it hath a little Iland about one league distant from the maine Iland, betweene both of the which it is navigable for any ships, and is called Graciosa . Both Forteventura and Lanzarota have very little wine of the growth of those Ilands. It standeth in 27 degrees. Thus much have I written of these seven Ilands by experience, because I was a dweller there, as I have sayd before, the space of seven yeeres in the affaires of master Thomas Locke, master Anthonie Hickman, and master Edward Castelin, who in those dayes were worthy merchants, and of great credite
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voiage made out of England unto Guinea and Benin in Affrike, at the charges of certaine marchants Adventurers of the Citie of London, in the yeere of our Lord 1553. (search)
ly understood of all men, I have thought good for this purpose, before I intreat hereof, to make a briefe description of Africa , being that great part of the world, on whose West side beginneth the coast of Guinea at Cabo Verde, about twelve degreeainly appeare in the description of the second voyage. A briefe description of Afrike gathered by Richard Eden. IN Africa the lesse are these kingdoms: the kingdom of Tunis and Constantina , which is at this day under Tunis , and also the re the great master of the Rhodes. Under the South of this kingdom are the great deserts of Lybia. All the nations in this Africa the lesse are of the sect of Mahomet, and a rusticall people, living scattred in villages. The best of this part of AfriGentiles, and idolatrous, without profession of any religion, or other knowledge of God, then by the law of nature. Africa the great is one of the three parts of the world, knowen in old time, and severed from Asia, on the East by the river Ni
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second voyage to Guinea set out by Sir George Barne, Sir John Yorke, Thomas Lok, Anthonie Hickman and Edward Castelin, in the yere 1554. The Captaine whereof was M. John Lok. (search)
mewhat of the people and their maners, and maner of living, with an other briefe description of Africa also. It is to be understood, that the people which now inhabite the regions of the coast of Guinea, and the midle parts of Africa , as Libya the inner, and Nubia , with divers other great & large regions about the same, were in old time called Æthiopes and Nigritae, which we now call Marrying with them great gourdes of water. The Ethiopians called Nigritae occupy a great part of Africa , and are extended to the West Ocean. Southward also they reach to the river Nigritis, whose natame are in every globe and card, it were here superfluous to rehearse them. Some write that Africa was so named by the Grecians, because it is without colde. For the Greeke letter Alpha or A siganer already halfe way in Purgatorie or hell. Gemma Phrisius writeth, that in certaine parts of Africa , as in Atlas the greater, the aire in the night season is scene shining, with many strange fire
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voyage with three tall ships, the Penelope Admirall, the Marchant royall Viceadmirall, and the Edward Bonaventure Rereadmirall, to the East Indies, by the Cape of Buona Speransa, to Quitangone neere Mosambique, to the Iles of Comoro and Zanzibar on the backeside of Africa , and beyond Cape Comori in India, to the lies of Nicubar and of Gomes Polo within two leagues of Sumatra, to the Ilands of Pulo Pinaom, and thence to the maine land of Malacca, begunne by M. George Raymond, in the yeere 1591, and performed by M. James Lancaster, and written from the mouth of Edmund Barker of Ipswich, his lieutenant in the sayd voyage, by M. Richard Hakluyt. (search)
l ships, the Penelope Admirall, the Marchant royall Viceadmirall, and the Edward Bonaventure Rereadmirall, to the East Indies, by the Cape of Buona Speransa, to Quitangone neere Mosambique, to the Iles of Comoro and Zanzibar on the backeside of Africa , and beyond Cape Comori in India, to the lies of Nicubar and of Gomes Polo within two leagues of Sumatra, to the Ilands of Pulo Pinaom, and thence to the maine land of Malacca, begunne by M. George Raymond, in the yeere 1591, and performed by M.ons a whole day. And this skole of fish continued with our ship for the space of five or sixe weekes, all which while we tooke to the quantitie aforesayd, which was no small refreshing to us. In February 1593. we fell with the Eastermost land of Africa at a place called Baia de Agoa some 100 leagues to the Northeast of the Cape of Good Hope: and finding the winds contrary, we spent a moneth or five weekes before we could double the Cape. After wee had doubled it in March folowing, wee directed
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Letters patents or priviledges granted by her Majestic to certaine Noble men and Marchants of London, for a trade to Barbarie, in the yeere 1585. (search)
Holmden, John Swinnerton, Robert Walkaden, Simon Lawrence, Nicholas Stile, Oliver Stile, William Bond, Henrie Farrington, John Tedcastle, Walter Williams, William Brune, John Suzan, John Newton, Thomas Owen, Roger Afield, Robert Washborne, Reinold Guy, Thomas Hitchcocke, George Lydiat, John Cartwright, Henry Paiton, John Boldroe, Robert Bowyer, Anthonie Dassell, Augustine Lane, Robert Lion, and Thomas Dod, all of London, Marchants now trading into the Countrey of Barbary, in the parts of Africa , under the government of Muly Hammet Sheriffe, Emperor of Marocco, and king of Fesse and Sus, have sustained great and grievous losses, and are like to sustaine greater if it should not be prevented: In tender consideration whereof, and for that divers Marchandize of the same Countries are very necessary and convenient for the use and defence of this our Realme of England, and for divers other causes us specially moving, minding the reliefe and benefite of our said subjects, and the qui
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