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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
Goldsborough was Miss Louise Page, of Virginia, connected with the distinguished Lee and Page families, her father being a cousin of General R. E. Lee. April 19th, 1861. [from the Baltimore, Md., sun, July 24, 25, 1901.] A record of the events in Baltimore, Md., on that day. Conflict of the Sixth Massachusetts regiment with citizens. Of the 215,000 people who resided in Baltimore on April 19, 1861, there are perhaps not 50,000 remaining here to this day. Of the thousands who took part in the attack upon the Massachusetts troops as they passed through the city on that eventful day, or who witnessed the attack, but few remain. To the greatre and not through it. Governor Hicks said he had hoped no more troops would be sent through Maryland, but it could not be helped. On the afternoon of Friday, April 19, 1861, at 4 o'clock there was a great mass-meeting in Monument Square. Speeches were made by Dr. A. C. Robinson, Mayor Brown, William P. Preston, S. Teackle Wal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
April 19th, 1861. [from the Baltimore, Md., sun, July 24, 25, 1901.] A record of the events in Baltimore, Md., on that day. Conflict of the Sixth Massachusetts regiment with citizens. Of the 215,000 people who resided in Baltimore on April 19, 1861, there are perhaps not 50,000 remaining here to this day. Of the thoApril 19, 1861, there are perhaps not 50,000 remaining here to this day. Of the thousands who took part in the attack upon the Massachusetts troops as they passed through the city on that eventful day, or who witnessed the attack, but few remain. To the great mass of our people the riot of April 19 is simply an event of history. Men who were born here since it occurred have arrived at middle age, and those whore and not through it. Governor Hicks said he had hoped no more troops would be sent through Maryland, but it could not be helped. On the afternoon of Friday, April 19, 1861, at 4 o'clock there was a great mass-meeting in Monument Square. Speeches were made by Dr. A. C. Robinson, Mayor Brown, William P. Preston, S. Teackle Wal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.50 (search)
commissioned April 24, 1861. S. J. Tucker, first lieutenant, commissioned May 14, 1861. John T. Rogers, first lieutenant, commissioned May 16, 1861. Wm. English, second lieutenant, commissioned April 12, 1860. J. W. Archer, second lieutenant, commissioned April 16, 1861. ——Tyree, second lieutenant, commissioned May 18, 1861. F. H. Langley, second lieutenant, commisssioned May 4, 1861. F. H. Hagemeyer, second lieutenant, commissioned February 14, 1861. Henry Harvey, second lieutenant, commissioned April 18, 1861. H. H. Miles, second lieutenant, commissioned April 23, 1861. W. M. Harrison, second lieutenant, commissioned April 18, 1861. Henry Linkenbauer, second lieutenant, commissioned April 25, 1861. J. T. Vaughan, second lieutenant, commissioned April 24, 1861. George Hatley Norton, second lieutenant, commissioned May 13, 1861. ——Tabb, second lieutenant, commissioned May 18, 1861. M. Seayers, second lieutenant, commissioned April 19, 1861
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Index. Adams C. F., 122. Allen, R. M., 314. Allston, Samuel, 9. Anderson, Colonel, Archer, 280. Anderson, General J. R., 147, 156. Anderson General R. H. 124. Archer's Brigade, General J. J., 349. Ashby, Captain Richard 187. Ashby, General, Turner, killed, 136. Atlanta, Ga., Burning of, 108. Avery, Colonel, Isaac, killed, 349. Baldwin, W. T., 239. Baltimore, Md., April 19, 1861, 251. Battle, General Cullen A., 284. Behan's, Mrs. W. J., Address of, 8. Benjamin, J. P., 348. Bentonville, N. C., Battle of, 216. Bethel, Battle of, 197, 205. Bidgood, Joseph V., 176. Bingham, G. L., killed, 143. Bird, Spotswood, 269. Black, Irving A., 173. Black, Hon Jeremiah B., 122. Blackford, Captain O. M., 45. Blair Hon. F P., 181. Bloody Angle at Spotsylvania Court House, 195. Brockenbrough Major J. B., 244. Brook Church Fight, 139. Butler General B. F., Infamous order of, 118; his Expedition to Bethel, 198. Cameron, Ex-Governor W. E.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), My personal experiences in taking up arms and in the battle of Malvern Hill. (search)
mes and in the blood of her sons, and also fully realizing the blessings of the restored Union, I still declare from the deepest depth of my convictions, that she was right. Yes, I rejoice that my whole being responded in approval and applause of that act of my State. I rejoice in recalling with what willingness I was ready to give my life in its support, and it is the summation of the pride of my life that I served humbly in her cause. Well do I remember that memorable day, the 19th of April, 1861. Animated by the feeling I have described, fully realizing the immediate imminence of strife, and determined to be ready for it how soon soever it might come, at my own expense I armed myself with musket and accoutrements, took my stand at the Ocean House corner, and there with eagerness awaited the first beat of the first drum that sounded in Virginia the first call to arms. You remember the profound interest and emotion of that hour. It stifled all light feelings, and gave to e
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Virginia Battlefield Park. (search)
itors pick up a great deal in the course of the next few months, it will distance them all.—The Dispatch.) Roster of Churchville Cavalry. The following is the muster-roll of the Churchville Cavalry, of Augusta county, Va., from the 19th day of April, 1861, to the 30th day of June, 1861. This company was commanded by Captain Franklin F. Sterrett, who was prior to the war colonel of the 160th Regiment of Virginia Militia, having succeeded Colonel John B. Baldwin, of Staunton. Captain Sterret died suddenly of apoplexy at his home, in Augusta county, on Sunday, June 18, 1899. This company was enrolled in active service at Churchville from the 19th day of April, 1861: Franklin F. Sterrett, captain. Robert R. Ruff, first lieutenant. George A. Hanger, second lieutenant. James Cochran, third lieutenant. Joseph A. Wilson, first sergeant. John T. Eubank, second sergeant. Henry H. Hanger, third sergeant. Hugh F. Turk, fourth sergeant. John L. Hill, fifth sergeant
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), My personal experiences in taking up arms and in the battle of Malvern Hill. (search)
and in the blood of her sons, and also fully realizing all the blessings of the restored Union, I still declare from the deepest depths of my convictions, that she was right. Yes, I rejoice that my whole being responded in approval and applause of that act of my State. I rejoice in recalling with what willingness I was ready to give my life in its support, and it is the summation of the pride of my life that I served humbly in her cause. Well do I remember that memorable day, the 19th of April, 1861. Animated by the feeling I have described, fully realizing the immediate imminence of strife, and determined to be ready for it how soon soever it might come, at my own expense I armed myself with musket and accoutrements, took my stand at the Ocean House corner, and there with eagerness awaited the first beat of the first drum that sounded in Virginia the first call to arms. You remember the profound interest and emotion of that hour. It stifled all light feelings, and gave to
173, 176, 178, 180; in Alabama and Georgia, VII., 178; Old Capitol, at Washington, VIII., 289. Pritchard, B. D., IX., 295. Pritchard's Mills, Md., I., 352. Private agencies of relief Vii., 321-344 Privateers: Confederate, conviction of, by United States court and the trouble that ensued, VII., 29, 34, 36; crews of, proclaimed pirates by Lincoln, VI., 84; careers of, VI., 122; abandoned for blockade running, VI., 290; Proclamation of president l, Lincoln regard to (April 19, 1861), VII., 34. Proclamation of Abraham Lincoln, call for troops, VIII., 108 seq. Proclamation of Emancipation, preliminary, VII., 110. Proctor, D. C., I., 105. Proctor, R., IX., 155. Projectiles: the Charrin type, V., 138; for cannon, V., 146; the Hotchkiss type, V., 184, 190; the Parrott type, V., 184, 190; the Schenkl type, V., 184, 190; the Armstrong type, V., 190; the Blakely type, V., 190; the Whitworth type, V., 190. Prospect Hill, Washington, D. C. :
cribed amid great enthusiasm, to complete the uniforming of the company and to aid the families of the soldiers while they were away. A committee of thirteen was formed to apportion the money raised. Thirteen must have been an unlucky number in this case, for by a series of misunderstandings the uniforms were not paid for until over a year after the return of the company, and only after a long dispute and legal process. Col. Lawrence was ordered to report in Boston with his regiment April 19, 1861. His orders were issued April 18, and were delivered by the hand of his brother, Mr. Daniel W. Lawrence. It is a strange coincidence that this second summons of the minutemen should have come on the exact anniversary of Paul Revere's ride. On the afternoon of April 20 a great crowd assembled in the square to bid the company God-speed. A hush fell as the company formed in a hollow square, and the Rev. Jarvis A. Ames of the Methodist Church offered prayer. The company left on the t
A Medford incident. On page 190 of his History of Medford, Mr. Usher gave a graphic account of the farewell given the Lawrence Light Guard on April 19, 1861, on the occasion of their departure for the South. Miss Wild alluded to it in her paper relating to the company, and Mrs. Saxe in hers upon the Methodist Church, both published in the Register. The Rev. Mr. Ames who offered the prayer, alluded to by these writers, had been stationed at Lynn for two years, and was by his bishop appointed to Medford on April 12, the day memorable for the Southern attack upon Fort Sumter. Coming at once to his charge, he reached Medford the same day as did the news of the overt act of rebellion that was to cause the mighty uprising. He was then a young man, and Medford was one of his earliest appointments. Nature had not been generous to him. He was slight in stature and frail in body, but strong in spirit; doubtless radical in utterance, possessing the courage of his convictions, y
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