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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A true discourse of the three Voyages of discoverie, for the finding of a passage to Cathaya, by the Northwest, under the conduct of Martin Frobisher Generall: Before which, as a necessary Preface is prefixed a twofolde discourse, conteining certaine reasons to prove all partes of the World habitable. Penned by Master George Best, a Gentleman employed in the same voyages. (search)
th us foorth. Others againe imagine the middle Zone to be extreme hot, because the people of Africa , especially the Ethiopians, are so cole blacke, and their haire like wooll curled short, which , but by way of Angle in reflection, and not by his neerenesse to the earth: for throughout all Africa , yea in the middest of the middle Zone, and in all other places upon the tops of mountaines theto all the worlde. And of this blacke and cursed Chus came all these blacke Moores which are in Africa , for after the water was vanished from off the face of the earth, and that the lande was dry, Sch nowe is called Asia , and Japhet had that which now is called Europa, wherein wee dwell, and Africa remained for Cham and his blacke sonne Chus, and was called Chamesis after the fathers name, bate; Which also may bee prooved by this example, that these blacke men are found in allparts of Africa , as well without the Tropickes, as within, even unto Capo de buona Speranza Southward, where, b
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Experiences and reasons of the Sphere, to proove all partes of the worlde habitable, and thereby to confute the position of the five Zones. (search)
th us foorth. Others againe imagine the middle Zone to be extreme hot, because the people of Africa , especially the Ethiopians, are so cole blacke, and their haire like wooll curled short, which , but by way of Angle in reflection, and not by his neerenesse to the earth: for throughout all Africa , yea in the middest of the middle Zone, and in all other places upon the tops of mountaines theto all the worlde. And of this blacke and cursed Chus came all these blacke Moores which are in Africa , for after the water was vanished from off the face of the earth, and that the lande was dry, Sch nowe is called Asia , and Japhet had that which now is called Europa, wherein wee dwell, and Africa remained for Cham and his blacke sonne Chus, and was called Chamesis after the fathers name, bate; Which also may bee prooved by this example, that these blacke men are found in allparts of Africa , as well without the Tropickes, as within, even unto Capo de buona Speranza Southward, where, b
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Voyages of the English Nation to Newfoundland , to the Isles of Ramea, and the Isles of Assumption otherwise called Natiscotec, situate at the mouth of the River of Canada, and to the coastes of Cape Briton, and Arambec, corruptly called Norumbega, with the Patents, letters, and advertisements thereunto belonging. (search)
t and Christendome, bringing them to the high water marke, and when hee doubteth that any of those great Cods by reason of shelving ground bee like to tumble into the Sea againe, hee will warily take heede and carrie him up backe to the heape of his fellowes. This doeth cause my friendes to wonder, and at the first hearing to judge them notorious lies, but they laugh and are merrie when they heare the meanes howe each tale is true. I tolde you once I doe remember how in my travaile into Africa and America , I found trees that bare Oisters, which was strange to you, till I tolde you that their boughes hung in the water, on which both Oisters and Muskles did sticke fast, as their propertie is, to stakes and timber. Nowe to let these merrie tales passe, and to come to earnest matters againe, you shall understand, that Newfoundland is in a temperate Climate, and not so colde as foolish Mariners doe say, who finde it colde sometimes when plentie of Isles of yce lie neere the shore
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter written to M. Richard Hakluyt of the middle Temple, conteining a report of the true state and commodities of Newfoundland , by M. Anthonie Parkhurst Gentleman, 1578. (search)
t and Christendome, bringing them to the high water marke, and when hee doubteth that any of those great Cods by reason of shelving ground bee like to tumble into the Sea againe, hee will warily take heede and carrie him up backe to the heape of his fellowes. This doeth cause my friendes to wonder, and at the first hearing to judge them notorious lies, but they laugh and are merrie when they heare the meanes howe each tale is true. I tolde you once I doe remember how in my travaile into Africa and America , I found trees that bare Oisters, which was strange to you, till I tolde you that their boughes hung in the water, on which both Oisters and Muskles did sticke fast, as their propertie is, to stakes and timber. Nowe to let these merrie tales passe, and to come to earnest matters againe, you shall understand, that Newfoundland is in a temperate Climate, and not so colde as foolish Mariners doe say, who finde it colde sometimes when plentie of Isles of yce lie neere the shore
which the princes of Portugall have made round about the West, the South, and the East parts of Africa , and also at Callicut, and in the East Indies, and in America , at Brasile and elsewhere in sude Bon Esperanze, & passing the currents that run upon the said coast, on the Southeast part of Africa , between the said maine land & the Island of S. Laurence, otherwise called of the ancients, Madzo de Albuquerque, they did discover, people, and plant at Ceffala, being upon the East side of Africa , in the twenty degrees of latitude of the south Pole, and direct West from the Iland of S. Laurla, divers doe affirme that king Salomon did fetch his gold) as also upon the said East side of Africa , they did afterward discover, people, and plant at Mozambique , Quiola, Monbaza, and Melinde, to up to the streight of Babel-Mandell at the entring of the red sea, all upon the East coast of Africa , from whence they put off at the Cape of Guarda Fu, and past the great gulfe of Arabia , and
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The seventh Chapter sheweth that the planting there, is not a matter of such charge or difficultie, as many would make it seeme to be. (search)
which the princes of Portugall have made round about the West, the South, and the East parts of Africa , and also at Callicut, and in the East Indies, and in America , at Brasile and elsewhere in sude Bon Esperanze, & passing the currents that run upon the said coast, on the Southeast part of Africa , between the said maine land & the Island of S. Laurence, otherwise called of the ancients, Madzo de Albuquerque, they did discover, people, and plant at Ceffala, being upon the East side of Africa , in the twenty degrees of latitude of the south Pole, and direct West from the Iland of S. Laurla, divers doe affirme that king Salomon did fetch his gold) as also upon the said East side of Africa , they did afterward discover, people, and plant at Mozambique , Quiola, Monbaza, and Melinde, to up to the streight of Babel-Mandell at the entring of the red sea, all upon the East coast of Africa , from whence they put off at the Cape of Guarda Fu, and past the great gulfe of Arabia , and
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Divers voyages made by Englishmen to the famous Citie of Mexico, and to all or most part of the other principall provinces, cities, townes and places throughout the great and large kingdom of New Spaine, even as farre as Nicaragua and Panama, & thence to Peru : together with a description of the Spaniards forme of government there: and sundry pleasant relations of the maners and customes of the natural inhabitants, and of the manifold rich commodities & strange rarities found in those partes of the continent: & other matters most worthy the observation. (search)
their Captaines and Masters, and of our trafique and dealing upon the coast of Africa . UPON munday the second of October 1567. the weather being reasonable faire, osaile, and departed from Plim mouth upon his intended voyage for the parts of Africa , and America , being accompanied with five other saile of ships, as namely then the eightenth day of the same moneth wee came to an ancker upon the coast of Africa , at Cape Verde in twelve fadome water; and here our Generall landed certaine or abode to depart with them, and such marchandize as hee had from the coast of Africa , towards the West Indies, and therefore commanded with all diligence to take iChap. 2. Wherein is showed the day and time of our departure from the coast of Africa , with the day and time of our arrivall in the West Indies, also of our trade, intment, upon the thirde day of Februarie 1568. wee departed from the coast of Africa , having the weather somewhat tempestuous, which made our passage the more hard
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A discourse written by one Miles Philips Englishman, one of the company put on shoare Northward of Panuco, in the West Indies by M. John Hawkins 1568. conteining many special things of that countrey and of the Spanish government, but specially of their cruelties used to our Englishmen, and amongst the rest to him selfe for the space of 15. or 16. yeres together, until by good and happy meanes he was delivered from their bloody hands, and returned into his owne Countrey. An. 1582. (search)
their Captaines and Masters, and of our trafique and dealing upon the coast of Africa . UPON munday the second of October 1567. the weather being reasonable faire, osaile, and departed from Plim mouth upon his intended voyage for the parts of Africa , and America , being accompanied with five other saile of ships, as namely then the eightenth day of the same moneth wee came to an ancker upon the coast of Africa , at Cape Verde in twelve fadome water; and here our Generall landed certaine or abode to depart with them, and such marchandize as hee had from the coast of Africa , towards the West Indies, and therefore commanded with all diligence to take iChap. 2. Wherein is showed the day and time of our departure from the coast of Africa , with the day and time of our arrivall in the West Indies, also of our trade, intment, upon the thirde day of Februarie 1568. wee departed from the coast of Africa , having the weather somewhat tempestuous, which made our passage the more hard
, with the number and names of the ships, their Captaines and Masters, and of our trafique and dealing upon the coast of Africa . UPON munday the second of October 1567. the weather being reasonable faire, our Generall M. John Hawkins, having commanppointed for Master Robert Barret, hoised saile, and departed from Plim mouth upon his intended voyage for the parts of Africa , and America , being accompanied with five other saile of ships, as namely the Mynion, wherein went for Captaine M. Johnf November, and holding on our course, upon the eightenth day of the same moneth wee came to an ancker upon the coast of Africa , at Cape Verde in twelve fadome water; and here our Generall landed certaine of our men, to the number of 160. or therea 500. Negros thought it best without longer abode to depart with them, and such marchandize as hee had from the coast of Africa , towards the West Indies, and therefore commanded with all diligence to take in fresh water and fewel, and so with speed
Chap. 2. Wherein is showed the day and time of our departure from the coast of Africa , with the day and time of our arrivall in the West Indies, also of our trade, and trafique there, and also of the great crueltie that the Spaniards used towards us, by the Vice-roy his direction, and appointment, falsifying his faith and promise given, and seeking to have intrapped us. ALL things being made in a readinesse, at our Generall his appointment, upon the thirde day of Februarie 1568. wee departed from the coast of Africa , having the weather somewhat tempestuous, which made our passage the more hard; and sayling so for the space of 52. dayes, upon the 27. of March 1568. we came in sight of an yland called Dominica , upon the coast of America in the West Indies, situated in 14. degrees of latitude, and 322. of longitude: from thence our Generall coasted from place to place, ever making trafique with the Spaniards and Indians as hee might, which was so
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