Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1794 AD or search for 1794 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Combs, Leslie 1794-1881 (search)
Combs, Leslie 1794-1881 Military officer; born in Kentucky in 1794. His father was an officer in the Revolution and a hunter. Leslie was the youngest of twelve children, and was distinguished for energy and bravery in the War of 1812-15. He commanded a company of scouts, and did admirable service for the salvation of Fort Meigs. When General Harrison was about to be closely besieged in Fort Meigs (May, 1813), he sent Capt. William Oliver to urge Gen. Clay Green (q. v.) to push forward r1794. His father was an officer in the Revolution and a hunter. Leslie was the youngest of twelve children, and was distinguished for energy and bravery in the War of 1812-15. He commanded a company of scouts, and did admirable service for the salvation of Fort Meigs. When General Harrison was about to be closely besieged in Fort Meigs (May, 1813), he sent Capt. William Oliver to urge Gen. Clay Green (q. v.) to push forward rapidly with the Kentuckians he was then leading towards the Maumee Rapids. While Colonel Dudley, whom Clay had sent forward, was on his way down the Leslie Combs. Au Glaize River, Clay heard of the perilous condition of Fort Meigs, and resolved to send word to Harrison of his near approach. He called for a volunteer, when Leslie Combs—then nineteen years of age —promptly responded. When we reach Fort defiance, said Combs, if you will furnish me with a good canoe, I will carry your despatc
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Corwin, Thomas 1794-1865 (search)
Corwin, Thomas 1794-1865 Statesman; born in Bourbon county, Ky., July 29, 1794; reared to manhood on a farm, attending a common school in winter; began the study of law in 1815; admitted to the bar in 1818; became a member of the Ohio legislature in 1822, and was elected to Congress in 1830. He remained in the Thomas Corwin. House until elected governor of Ohio in 1840. In 1845 he was chosen United States Senator, and was called to the cabinet of President Fillmore in 1850, as Secretary of the Treasury. He was again elected to Congress in 1859. In 1861 President Lincoln sent him as minister to Mexico. Mr. Corwin was an eloquent, witty, and effective speaker. He died in Washington, D. C., Dec. 18, 1865. The War with Mexico. The action of Congress upon the subject of the Mexican War, in the winter of 1846-47, gave rise to a question in which an important principle was involved. Is it the duty of the legislature to provide the means of prosecuting a war made unconsti
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Covington, Leonard 1768- (search)
Covington, Leonard 1768- Military officer; born in Aquasco, Prince George co., Md., Oct. 30, 1768; was commissioned lieutenant of dragoons March 14, 1792; joined the army under General Wayne, and behaved so gallantly in the war with the Indians in 1794 that his general made honorable mention of his services. He was promoted to captain, and soon afterwards retired from the military service. After occupying a seat in the legislature of Maryland, he was a member of Congress from 1805 to 1807. In the latter year he was appointed lieutenant-colonel of cavalry, and was made a brigadier in 1813, and ordered to the northern frontier. In the battle at Chrysler's Field (Nov. 11, 1813) he was mortally wounded, and died three days afterwards, Nov. 14, 1813.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Coxe, Tench 1755- (search)
Coxe, Tench 1755- Political economist; born in Philadelphia, May 22, 1755. He was a grandson of Dr. Daniel Coxe, Queen Anne's physician; was an industrious writer on political economy, and especially upon the subjects of the manufacturing interests of the United States. From 1787 until his death, July 17, 1824, there never was an important movement in favor of the introduction and promotion of manufactures in which his name did not appear prominent. In 1794 he published a large volume on the subject of cotton culture and cognate topics. At that time he was commissioner of the revenue at Philadelphia. In 1806 he published an essay on the naval power and the encouragement of manufactures; and the following year he issued a memoir on the cultivation and manufacture of cotton.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Craig, Sir James Henry 1749- (search)
Craig, Sir James Henry 1749- Military officer; born in Gibraltar in 1749; entered the British army as ensign in 1763, was aide-de-camp to General Boyd at Gibraltar in 1770, and came to America in 1774. He remained in service here from the battle of Bunker Hill until the evacuation of Charleston, in 1781, when he held the rank of lieutenant-colonel. He was made a major-general in 1794, lieutenant-general in 1801, and governorgeneral and commander-in-chief of Canada in 1807. Totally unfit for civil rule, he was a petty oppressor as governor; his administration was short, and he returned to England in 1811, where he died Jan. 12, 1812.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cutler, Ephraim 1767-1853 (search)
Cutler, Ephraim 1767-1853 Surveyor; born in Edgarton. Mass., in 1767; appointed agent of the Ohio Company in 1788; removed to Ohio in 1794; appointed judge of Common Pleas in 1795. He was the author of History of the first settlement of Amestown, Ohio, etc. He died in Amestown, O., in 1853.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dale, Richard, (search)
ov. 6, 1756; went to sea at twelve years of age, and at nineteen commanded a merchant vessel. He was first a lieutenant in the Virginia navy, and entered the Continental navy, as midshipman, in 1776. He was captured in 1777, and confined in Mill Prison, England, from which he escaped, but was recaptured in London and taken back. The next year, he escaped, reached France, joined Paul Jones, and soon became lieutenant of the Bon Homme Richard, receiving a wound in the famous battle with the Serapis. He continued to do good service Richard Dale. to the end of the war, and in 1794 was made captain. He commanded the squadron ordered to the Mediterranean in 1801, and in April, 1802, returning home, he resigned his commission. He spent the latter years of his life in ease in Philadelphia, where he died, Feb. 24, 1826. The remains of Commodore Dale were buried in Christ Church-yard, Philadelphia, and over the grave is a white marble slab with a long inscription. Dale's monument.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dix, Dorothea Lynde, 1794-1887 (search)
Dix, Dorothea Lynde, 1794-1887 Philanthropist; born in Worcester, Mass., about 1794. After her father's death she supported herself by teaching a school for young girls in Boston. Becoming interested in the welfare of the convicts in the State prison at Charlestown, her philanthropic spirit expanded and embraced all of the unfortunate and suffering classes. Having inherited from a relative property sufficient to render her independent, she went to Europe for her health. Returning to Bos1794. After her father's death she supported herself by teaching a school for young girls in Boston. Becoming interested in the welfare of the convicts in the State prison at Charlestown, her philanthropic spirit expanded and embraced all of the unfortunate and suffering classes. Having inherited from a relative property sufficient to render her independent, she went to Europe for her health. Returning to Boston in 1837, she devoted her life to the investigation and alleviation of the condition of paupers, lunatics, and prisoners, encouraged by her friend and pastor, Dr. Channing. In this work she visited every State in the Union east of the Rocky Mountains, endeavoring to persuade legislatures to aid the unfortunate, and was instrumental in bringing about the foundation of several State asylums for the insane. At the breaking out of the Civil War she was appointed superintendent of hospital nurs
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Duane, James, 1733-1797 (search)
f the first Continental Congress (1774); also in Congress from 1780 to 1782; was in the Provincial Convention of New York in 1776-77; and was on the committee to draft the first constitution of that State. He returned to New York City in 1783, after the evacuation, and was the first mayor of that city after the Revolution. In 1783-84 he was a member of the council and State Senator, and in 1788 was a member of the convention of New York that adopted the national Constitution. From 1789 to 1794 he was United States district judge. He died in Duanesburg, N. Y., Feb. 1, 1797. Late in May, 1775, Judge Duane moved in Congress, in committee of the whole, the opening of negotiations in order to accommodate the unhappy disputes subsisting between Great Britain and the colonies, and that this be made a part of the [second] petition to the King prepared by John Jay. It was a dangerous James Duane proposal at that time, as it was calculated to cool the ardor of resistance which then ani
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Duval, Gabriel, 1752-1844 (search)
Duval, Gabriel, 1752-1844 Statesman; born in Prince George county, Md., Dec. 6, 1752; was a member of Congress, 1794-96, when he resigned upon his appointment as judge of the Supreme Court of Maryland. In 1811 he was appointed to the United States Supreme Court and served until 1836, when he resigned. He died in Prince George county, March 6, 1844.
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