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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 47 47 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 47 47 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 44 44 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 43 43 Browse Search
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register 42 42 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 42 42 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 42 42 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 41 41 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 40 40 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 38 38 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1862 AD or search for 1862 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bache, George M., 1840-1896 (search)
Bache, George M., 1840-1896 Naval officer; born in the District of Columbia, Nov. 12, 1840; was graduated at the Naval Academy in 1860. He became lieutenant in 1862; lieutenant-commmander in 1866; and commander in 1875; and was retired April 5, 1875. He commanded an ironclad gunboat on the Mississippi early in the Civil War, and behaved with great bravery before Vicksburg. He was afterwards in command of a little squadron of gunboats in a spirited action near Clarendon, Ark., in June, 1864. He died in Washington, D. C., Feb. 11, 1896.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bailey, Guildfor Dudley, 1834- (search)
ted the fort and sailed for New York, where he arrived March 15, 1861. Soon afterwards Lieutenant Bailey was sent with reinforcements for Fort Pickens. His mission was successful. Sickness finally compelled him to return to New York to recruit his strength. Soon afterwards he was requested by Governor Morgan to organize a State regiment of light artillery, of which he was made colonel. With these troops, which he had well disciplined at Elmira, he went to Washington, and in the spring of 1862 he joined the Army of the Potomac at Fort Monroe. At the battle of fair Oaks, or seven Pines (q. v.), Colonel Bailey was in General Casey's division. When the sudden and furious attack was made, the infantry fell back, leaving Colonel Bailey's battery exposed. Instead of retreating and leaving his guns in the hands of the Confederates, he determined to make their spoils useless to them. Leaping from his horse, he was in the act of spiking one of the guns with his own hand, when the bulle
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bailey, Theodorus, 1805-1877 (search)
-admiral on the retired list. In 1861 Captain Bailey was in command of the Colorado, in the Western Gulf squadron. and was second in command of the expedition under Butler and Farragut up the Mississippi to capture New Orleans. in the spring of 1862. His vessel was too large to pass the bar, and taking what men and guns he could spare. he went up the river in his boats as a volunteer, and assumed the command of the first division. He led in the desperate attack on Fort St. Philip. Fort Jackson, and the Confederate flotilla. It was one of the most gallant naval operations of the war; and Admiral Farragut specially commended Captain Bailey as the leader in that attack. In 1862 he was in command of the Eastern Gulf squadron, and was successful in breaking up Theodrus Bailey. blockade-running on the Florida coast. He captured about 150 of those vessels in the space of a year and a half. In 1865-67 he was in command of the navy-yard at Portsmouth. He died in Washington, D. C.,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baldwin, Charles H., 1822-1888 (search)
Baldwin, Charles H., 1822-1888 Naval officer; born in New York City, Sept. 3, 1822; entered the navy in 1839; served through the Mexican War on the frigate Congress; commanded the steamer Clifton of the mortar flotilla at the passage of Forts Jackson and St. Philip below New Orleans, and in the first attack on Vicksburg. both in 1862; was promoted rear-admiral in 1883; and was the official representative of the United States at the coronation of the Emperor of Russia. He died in New York City, Nov. 17, 1888.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Baldwin, Theodore A., 1839- (search)
Baldwin, Theodore A., 1839- Military officer; born in New Jersey. Dec. 31, 1839; entered the army in 1862; served through the Civil War; became lieutenant-colonel, 10th United States Cavalry, in 1896; was a brigadier-general of volunteers in the American-Spanish War: and was promoted to colonel of the 7th United States Cavalry. May 6, 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bangs, John Kendrick, 1862- (search)
Bangs, John Kendrick, 1862- Author; born in Yonkers, N. Y., May 27, 1862; was graduated at Columbia University in 1883; studied law; became associate editor of Life in 1884; editor of Drawer in 1888, and of Literary notes in Harper's magazine in 1898; and editor of Harper's weekly in 1900.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Banks, National. (search)
,000 of which had been issued during the previous year. A bill was soon after prepared in accordance with the Secretary's views, and printed for the use of the committee of ways and means, but it was not reported, and on July 8 following, Thaddeus Stevens, the chairmen of the committee, submitted the bill with an adverse report. The immediate necessities of the government compelled the further issue of legaltender notes, and the consideration of the bank act was deferred. In his report for 1862, Mr. Chase again urged the passage of the national bank bill, and President Lincoln also recommended it in his message. The principal reason why Mr. Chase advocated this system was because he thought it would greatly facilitate the negotiation of the United States bonds; in other words, make it much easier for the government to borrow money. It was also claimed that it would secure for the people in all parts of the country a currency of uniform security and value, and protect them from los
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barlow, Francis Channing, 1834-1896 (search)
Barlow, Francis Channing, 1834-1896 Military officer; born in Brooklyn, N. Y., Oct. 19, 1834; was graduated at Harvard University in 1855. After serving as a three months man, at the beginning of the Civil War, he became a lieutenant-colonel of a New York regiment, and as colonel distinguished himself in the campaign on the Peninsula in 1862. In the battle of Antietam he captured two stands of colors and 300 men, and was soon afterwards wounded and carried off the field for dead. He was made brigadier-general in September, and he commanded a division in the battle of Chancellorsville in May, 1863. He was wounded at Gettysburg, and was also distinguished in the Richmond campaign in 1864. He rendered essential service in the final struggle that ended with the surrender of Lee; was mustered out of the service in 1865 with the rank of major-general; was secretary of state of New York in 1865-68; United States marshal in 1868-69; and attorney-general of New York in 1871-73. He di
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Barnard, John gross, 1815-1882 (search)
r-general of volunteers in 1864; brevet brigadier-general and brevet major-general of regulars, March, 1865; and colonel of the corps of engineers, regular army, Dec. 28, the same year. During the war with Mexico he fortified Tampico, and made surveys of the battle-fields around the capital. In 1850-51 he was chief engineer of the projected Tehuantepec Railroad; and in 1855-56 he was superintendent of the United States Military Academy. He was chief engineer of the Army of the Potomac, 1861-62; also chief engineer of the construction of the defences of the national capital from September, 1862, to May, 1864. He was chief engineer of the armies in the field on General Grant's staff, from May, 1864, until Lee's surrender at Appomattox in April, 1865. At the close of the war he was brevetted major-general, U. S. A. He published The Gyroscopc and Problems in rotary motions, which evince profound mathematical investigation; also other works concerning the Civil War and its operations.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bartlett, John, 1820- (search)
Bartlett, John, 1820- Author: born in Plymouth, Mass., June 14, 1820; became a publisher in Cambridge. In 1862-63 he was a volunteer paymaster in the United States navy. He is best known for his Familiar quotations; The Shakspeare index; and The complete concordance to Shakspeare.
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