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Browsing named entities in A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith). You can also browse the collection for 70 AD or search for 70 AD in all documents.

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A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Gallus, Here'nnius a Roman general, legate of the first legion of the army on the Rhine (A. D. 69) was stationed at Bonn when the Batavian insurrection broke out, and was ordered by Hordeonius Flaccus to prevent some Batavian cohorts, which had deserted from the Romans, from uniting with Civilis. Hordeonius recalled his commands, but Gallus was compelled by his own soldiers to fight, and was defeated through the fault of his Belgic auxiliaries. He was afterwards associated with Vocula in the command, after the deposition of Hordeonius, and was in command of the camp at Gelduba when a trifling accident excited a mutiny among his soldiers, who scourged and bound him; but he was released by Vocula. When Vocula was killed at Novesium, Herennius was only bound. He was afterwards killed by Valentinus and Tutor, A. D. 70. [CIVILIS; VOCULA ; VALENTINUS]. (Tac. Hist. 4.19, 20, 26, 27, 59, 70, 77.) [P.S]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Gracilia, Verula'na a Roman lady who was besieged in the Capitol with Sabinus, the brother of Vespasian, during his contest with Vitellius A. D. 70. (Tac. Hist. 3.69.) The name should perhaps be written Gratilla. (Comp. Plm. Ep. 3.11, 5.1.) [W.B.D]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
to Macbeth, was one which had a tendency to fulfil itself. (Vit. 74, 75, Bell. Jud. 3.7, 8, 6.5.4; comp. Suet. Vesp. 4, 5; Tac. Hist. 5.13; Zonar. Ann. 6.18, 11.16; Euseb. Hist. Eccl. 3.8; Suid. s.v. *)Iwshpos; comp. Haggai, 2.7; Suet. Tit. 1.) When Vespasian was declared emperor, at Caesareia, according to Josephus (Bell. Jud. 4.10), but according to Tacitus and Suetonius, at Alexandria (Tac. Hist. 2.79, 80; Suet. Vesp. 7), he released Josephus from his confinement of nearly three years (A. D. 70), his chain being cut from him, at the suggestion of Titus, as a sign that he had been unjustly bound (Bell. Jud. 4.10.7); and his reputation as a prophet was, of course, greatly raised. He was present with Titus at the siege of Jerusalem, and was suspected as a traitor both by Jews and Romans. From the anger of the latter he was saved by Titus, through whose favour also he was able to preserve the lives of his brother and of many others after the capture of the city. Having been presented
Ita'licus one of the two kings of the Suevians who in A. D. 70 joined the party of Vespasian and fought against the Vitellians at Bedriacum in Cisalpine Gaul. (Tac. Hist. 3.5, 21.) He was probably a son of the Italicus mentioned by the same historian (Ann. 11.16) A. D. 47, who was invited to the chieftancy of the Cheruscans, and afterwards for his tyranny and intemperance expelled by them. In most editions of Tacitus the name is Italus, and, whether this or Italicus be the true reading, his Teutonic appellation is probably superseded by an agnomen derived from his education at Rome while detained there as an hostage. [FLAVIUS, p. 174.] [W.B.D]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Laco, Corne'lius originally a praetor's counsel (Heinccc. Antiq. Rom. 4.6.9), was promoted by Galba, A. D. 70, to the posts of courtchamberlain and praetorian prefect. Of the three favourites of Galba, who from their influence with him were called his pedagogues (Suet. Galb. 14; D. C. 64.2), Laco was the most slothful and not the least arrogant. In the disputes concerning the appointment of a colleague and successor to Galba, Laco opposed the nomination of Otho, and moved, it is said, by his intimacy with Rubellius Plautus, supported that of Piso. In the divisions of Galba's court and favourites Laco seems to have taken part with Icelus. [ICELUS.] Galba wished to send Laco to appease the discontent of the legions under Vitellius in Germany; but he refused to go, and was thought to have contributed to his patron's destruction by concealing from him the murmurs of the soldiery, and by advising him, when the praetorians had declared for Otho, to present himself to the mutineers. On Otho'
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Longi'nus, Aemi'lius a deserter from the first legion, murdered Vocula, at the instigation of Classicus, in the great revolt of the Treviri against the Romans, A. D. 70; but was shortly afterwards put to death by the soldiers of the sixteenth legion. (Tac. Hist. 4.59, 62.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Lupercus, Mu'mmius a Roman legate, and commander of the winter-quarters of two legions of the army of the Rhine, was sent by Hordeonius Flaccus against Civilis, by whom he was defeated and driven into Vetera Castra, the fortifications of which he repaired, and where he maintained himself bravely against the insurgents, till his soldiers, starving and dispirited, and solicited by the emissaries of Classicus, surrendered to Civilis, A. D. 69-70. [CIVILIS; CLASSICUS.] Lupercus was sent among the presents to the German prophetess Veleda, who had predicted the success of the insurgents; but he was killed on the journey. (Tac. Hist. 4.18, 22, 23, 61.) [P.S]
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
to [CAPITO COSSUTIANUS] in the impeachment of Thrasea Paetus, and for his exertions received from Nero an extravagant fee (id. Ann. 16.23, 26, 28, 33). The fortunes of Marcellus were for a time shaken by Nero's death. He became in turn the object of attack -- by Helvidius Priscus, Thrasea's son-iin-law, as a delator, and by Licinius Caecina, a partisan of Otho's [CAECINA, No. 10], as a favourer of Vitellius, A. D. 69. (Tac. Hist. 2.53, 4.6.) His contest with Helvidius Priscus in the senate, A. D. 70, when the mode of appointing the delegates to Vespasian in Egypt was debated, is sketched by Tacitus (Tac. Hist. 4.6-8) with a brevity that leaves nothing obscure. From Helvidius and Caecina Marcellus escaped as much through the dislocation of the times, the feebleness of the emperor, and the fears of the senate, as by his own eloquence and address. But Helvidius assailed him a third time on the old charge of delation, and, on this occasion, his talents, backed indeed by his strong interest
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Massa, Bae'bius or BE'BIUS, one of the most infamous informers of the latter end of the reign of Domitian, is first mentioned in A. D. 70, as one of the procurators in Africa, when he betrayed Piso, and is described by the great historian as "jam tune optimo cuique exitiosus." (Tac. Hist. 4.50.) He was afterwards governor of the province of Baetica, which he oppressed so unmercifully, that he was accused by the inhabitants on his return to Rome. The cause of the provincials was pleaded by Pliny the younger and Herennius Senecio, and Massa was condemned in the same year that Agricola died, A. D. 93; but he seems to have escaped punishment by the favour of Domitian; and from this time became one of the informers and great favourites of the tyrant. (Tac. Agric. 45; Plin. Ep. 7.33, comp. 3.4, 6.29 ; Juv. 1.34.)
A Dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith), (search)
Mau'ricus, Ju'nius called in some manuscripts both of Tacitus and Pliny Mariacs, was an intimate friend of Pliny, who says (Ep. 4.22) of him, "quo viro nihil finnius, nihil verius." Mauricus showed his independence by the question which he dared to ask Domitian in the senate, at the accession of Vespasian, A. D. 70 (Tac. Hist. 4.40), which is the first time that his name is mentioned; and it is therefore not surprising that he was banished during the reign of Domitian. He was recalled from exile by Nerva, and an anecdote related by Pliny (Ep. l.c.) and Aurelius Victor (Epit. 12) shows with what freedom he spoke to the latter emperor. (Tac. Agric. 45; Plin. Ep. 1.5.10, 3.11.3.) Mauricus was the brother of Arulenus Rusticus (Plin. Ep. 1.14). [RUSTICUS.] Three of Pliny's epistles are addressed to Mauricus (1.14, 2.18, 6.14).
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