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Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing), chapter 2 (search)
t I devoted. Fichte I could not understand at all; though the treatise which I read was one intended to be popular, and which he says must compel (bezwingen) to conviction. Jacobi I could understand in details, but not in system. It seemed to me that his mind must have been moulded by some other mind, with which I ought to be acquainted, in order to know him well,—perhaps Spinoza's. Since I came home, I have been consulting Buhle's and Tennemann's histories of philosophy, and dipping into Brown, Stewart, and that class of books. After I had cast the burden of my cares upon you, I rested, and read Petrarch for a day or two. But that could not last. I had begun to take an account of stock, as Coleridge calls it, and was forced to proceed He says few persons ever did this faithfully, without being dissatisfied with the result, and lowering their estimate of their supposed riches. With me it has ended in the most humiliating sense of poverty; and only just enough pride is left
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing), chapter 11 (search)
I was engaged in such a crowd of acquaintance, that I had hardly time to dress, and none to sleep, during all the weeks I was in London. I enjoyed the time extremely. I find myself much in my element in European society. It does not, indeed, come up to my ideal, but so many of the encumbrances are cleared away that used to weary me in America, that I can enjoy a freer play of faculty, and feel, if not like a bird in the air, at least as easy as a fish in water. In Edinburgh, I met Dr. Brown. He is still quite a young man, but with a high ambition, and, I should think, commensurate powers. But all is yet in the bud with him. He has a friend, David Scott, a painter, full of imagination, and very earnest in his views of art. I had some pleasant hours with them, and the last night which they and I passed with De Quincey, a real grand conversazione, quite in the Landor style, which lasted, in full harmony, some hours. Carlyle. Of the people I saw in London, you will wish
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The blockade and the cruisers. (search)
lure of preparation during peace, when plans could be matured, and materials accumulated at leisure, compelled, when the time of action came, a hurried and lavish expenditure. Great as was the task before the United States Government in preparing for a naval war, it was as nothing to that of the enemy. The latter had at his disposal a small number of trained officers imbued with the same ideas, and brought up in the same school, as their opponents. Some of these, like Buchanan, Semmes, Brown, Maffitt, and Brooke, were men of extraordinary professional qualities; but except in its officers, the Confederate Government had nothing in the shape of a navy. It had not a single ship-of-war. It had no abundant fleet of merchant-vessels in its ports from which to draw reserves. It had no seamen, for its people were not given to seafaring pursuits. Its only shipyards were Norfolk and Pensacola. Norfolk, with its immense supplies of ordnance and equipments, was indeed invaluable; but
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Authorities. (search)
ey, David B.: Gettysburg, Pa. 27 i, 486, 487 Blackford, William W.: Brandy Station, Va. 27 II, 686 Blake, Edward D.: New Madrid, Mo., and Island no.10 8, 137 Bowen, John S.: Port Gibson, Miss. 24 i, 665 Branch, L. O'B.: New Berne, N. C. 9, 248 Bratton, John: Wauhatchie, Tenn. 31 i, 232 Briscoe, James C.: Gettysburg, Pa. 27 i, 486, 487 Brooks, Thomas B.: Morris Island, S. C. 28 i, 263, 305-307, 309, 311, 320, 321, 332-334 Brown, Harvey: Pensacola Harbor, Fla. 1, 421 Buford, Abraham: Harrisburg, Miss. 39 i, 334 Burgwyn, H. K.: Weldon, N. C. 27 III, 1071 Butterfield, Daniel: Bull Run, Va. 12 III, 960 Campbell, Albert H.: Fredericksburg, Va. 21, 1129 Capron, Horace: Waynesborough, Tenn., and vicinity 45 i, 966 Cheatham, B. F.: Stone's River, Tenn. 20 i, 922 Clayton, Henry D.: Atlanta, Ga. 38 III, 820 Cleburne, Patrick R.: Chickamauga, Ga. 30
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Authorities. (search)
5-Sept. 4, 1864 88, 2 Brooks, Thomas B.: Bermuda Hundred, Va., June, 1864 65, 1 Morris Island, S. C., July 10-Sept. 7, 1863 38, 2; 44, 1, 2, 4 Brown, G.: Richmond, Va., and vicinity, 1864-65 77, 1 Brown, Harvey: Pickens Fort, Fla., May 27, 1861 5, 6 Brown, S. Howell Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3,Brown, Harvey: Pickens Fort, Fla., May 27, 1861 5, 6 Brown, S. Howell Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3, 1863 43, 1 Maryland Campaign, Sept. 3-20, 1862 29, 1 Browne, O. L.F.: Goldsborough, N. C., to Washington, D. C 86, 8-16 Buckner, Simon B.: Chickamauga, Ga., Sept. 19-20, 1863 111, 9 Buell, Don Carlos: Army of the Cumberland, campaigns 24, 3 Corinth, Miss., April 29-June 10, 1862 14, 3 PBrown, S. Howell Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3, 1863 43, 1 Maryland Campaign, Sept. 3-20, 1862 29, 1 Browne, O. L.F.: Goldsborough, N. C., to Washington, D. C 86, 8-16 Buckner, Simon B.: Chickamauga, Ga., Sept. 19-20, 1863 111, 9 Buell, Don Carlos: Army of the Cumberland, campaigns 24, 3 Corinth, Miss., April 29-June 10, 1862 14, 3 Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., April 6-7, 1862 13, 1 Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7, 1861 13, 1 Somerset, Ky., vicinity, 1861 9, 2 Bull, Asst. Surg. (C): Spanish Fort, Ala., March 27-April 8, 1865 90, 11 Burchard, W.: Chancellorsville Campaign, April 27-May 6, 1863 39, 3 Spotsylvania Court-House, Va., May 8-
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 22: 1868-1871: Aet. 61-64. (search)
hen Superintendent of the Coast Survey. From Professor Peirce. Coast Survey office, Washington, February 18, 1871. . . . I met Sumner in the Senate the day before yesterday, and he expressed immense delight at a letter he had received from Brown-Sequard, telling him that you were altogether free from disease. . . . Now, my dear friend, I have a very serious proposition for you. I am going to send a new iron surveying steamer round to California in the course of the summer. She will prohe way round? If so, what companions will you take? If not, who shall go? . . . From Agassiz to Professor Peirce. Cambridge, February 20, 1871. . . . I am everjoyed at the prospect your letter opens before me. Of course I will go, unless Brown-Sequard orders me positively to stay on terra firma. But even then, I should like to have a hand in arranging the party, as I feel there never was, and is not likely soon again to be, such an opportunity for promoting the cause of science genera
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 25: 1872-1873: Aet. 65-66. (search)
s outline of an egg, it seemed impossible that anything could be amiss with the hand or the brain that were so steady and so clear. The end, nevertheless, was very near. Although he dined with friends the next day, and was present at a family festival that week, he spoke of a dimness of sight, and of feeling strangely asleep. On the 6th he returned early from the Museum, complaining of great weariness, and from that time he never left his room. Attended in his illness by his friends, Dr. Brown-Sequard and Dr. Morrill Wyman, and surrounded by his family, the closing week of his life was undisturbed by acute suffering and full of domestic happiness. Even the voices of his brother and sisters were not wholly silent, for the wires that thrill with so many human interests brought their message of greeting and farewell across the ocean to his bedside. The thoughts and aims for which he had lived were often on his lips, but the affections were more vivid than the intellect in these
oth, 419. Borja Bay, 721. Boston, 401, 430. Boston, East, 442; laboratory, 443; observations upon the geology of, with reference to the glacial theory, 449, 450. Boston Harbor, 648. Botany, questions in, 40. Bowditch, 438. Braun, Alexander, 24, 25, 31, 67, 89, 94, 143, 179, 397, 643. Brazil, visit to, 625; freshwater fauna of, 633, 638, 640, 646; glacier phenomena, 638. Brewster, Sir, David, 473. Brongniart, 176. Bronn, 29, 48; his collection now in Cambridge, 30. Brown-Sequard, Dr., 782. Buch, Leopold von, 201, 256, 264, 265, 272, 274, 345. Buckland, Dr., invites Agassiz to England, 232; acts as his guide to fossil fishes, 250; to glacier tracks, 306; a convert to glacial theory, 307, 309, 311; mentioned by Murchison, 468. Burkhardt, 320, 442, 479, 494, 647. C. Cabot, J. E., 466. Cambridge, 457-459, 461. Cambridge, first mention of, 252. Campanularia, 494. Carlsruhe, Agassiz at, 30, 33. Cary, T. G., 581, 680. Castanea, 660. C
s, which were pronounced unsatisfactory; a decision in which history will concur. See Appendix for a message of Mr. Jefferson Davis to the rebel Congress, on this subject. It is unbecoming in soldiers to criticise the conduct of superiors, but, when, after rejecting the counsels of juniors, the condition of affairs is placed beyond the power of human nature to retrieve, the se-nior endeavors to escape responsibility by throwing the same upon the former, comment is unnecessary.—Report of Major Brown, Twentieth Mississippi. (The italics are his own.) Grant was preparing to storm the intrenchments, when Buckner's messenger arrived, and the white flag was hoisted on Fort Donelson. The rebel commander proposed an armistice till twelve o'clock, and the appointment of commissioners to settle terms of capitulation, in consideration of all the circumstances governing the present situation of affairs at this station; but Grant replied: No terms except unconditional and immediate surrender ca
erations to recover Lookout valley seizure of Brown's ferry March of Hooker from Bridgeport battll as of a crossing of the Tennessee, known as Brown's ferry. A bend in the Tennessee, just belo three miles below the mouth of Lookout creek, Brown's ferry is situated. Moccasin point was stillw the mouth of Lookout river, and is broken at Brown's ferry by a narrow gorge, through which a roa the use of pontoon bridges at Chattanooga and Brown's ferry, and of the north bank of the river ace expedition which was to effect a lodgment at Brown's ferry. Four thousand men were detailed, and and landed on the south side of the river, at Brown's ferry. Here, a volley was fired by the rebethe night, and went into camp within a mile of Brown's ferry. Howard had the advance, and, as it w twenty-eight miles; and the Kelly's ferry and Brown's ferry road, by use of which, and of the riveartments. When the line was first opened from Brown's ferry, he said to Thomas: The steamer Point [6 more...]
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