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The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Oldport days, with ten heliotype illustrations from views taken in Newport, R. I., expressly for this work. 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 23, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Letter from Naples (1841). (search)
ines come not as a letter, but only as an excuse. For I know nothing now of interest, except, perhaps, the loss of my Liberators, which the custom-house of his Holiness--under the general rule, I believe, forbidding all which has not passed the censorship — took from me as I went up to Rome, and which now lie at Civita Vecchia, waiting for me if I ever return that way. 'T is a melancholy tour, this through Europe; and I do not understand how any one can return from it without being, in Coleridge's phrase, a sadder and a wiser man. Every reflecting mind at home must be struck with the many social evils which prevail around; but the most careless eye cannot avoid seeing the painful contrasts which sadden one here at every step,--wealth beyond that of fairy tales, and poverty all bare and starved at its side; refinement face to face with barbarism; cultivation which hardly finds room to be, crowded out on all sides by so much debasement. I have been surprised to find so much faith
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The pulpit (1860). (search)
seen the performance once or twice you have gauged the extent, sounded the bottom,--men do not go more than twice, unless attracted by some rare rhetorical gift, as they crowded long ago to hear Everett read the fifteenth chapter of First Corinthians in Brattle-Street Church, the same as some hang night after night on the same words from Kean or Rachel; unless they go from the motive of example, from a sense of duty, from an idea of supporting the religious institutions of their times,--as Coleridge, you know, said he found, on inquiry, that four fifths of the people who attended his preaching attended from a sense of duty to the other fifth. Now, that is not a pulpit, in the sense of being able to keep the mind of an age. Mark me, I am not speaking in any bitterness toward the pulpit. I have no more bitterness than the municipality of Paris has when it cuts down an old street in order to make a new thoroughfare. My opinion is, that the age, in order to get all its advantage from
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The lost arts (1838). (search)
of our place, in fact, in the great procession of the ages. We seem to imagine that whether knowledge will die with us or not, it certainly began with us. We have a pitying estimate, a tender pity, for the narrowness, ignorance, and darkness of the bygone ages. We seem to ourselves not only to monopolize, but to have begun, the era of light. In other words, we are all running over with a fourth-day-of-July spirit of self-content. I am often reminded of the German whom the English poet Coleridge met at Frankfort. He always took off his hat with profound respect when he ventured to speak of himself. It seems to me, the American people might be painted in the chronic attitude of taking off its hat to itself; and therefore it can be no waste of time, with an audience in such a mood, to take their eyes for a moment from the present civilization, and guide them back to that earliest possible era that history describes for us, if it were only for the purpose of asking whether we boast
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Daniel O'Connell (1875.) (search)
e height of intellect and judgment to which God's gifts had lifted him, he saw clearly that no one right was ever in the way of another, that injustice harms the wrongdoer even more than the victim, that whoever puts a chain on another fastens it also on himself. Serenely confident that the truth is always safe, and justice always expedient, he saw that intolerance is only want of faith. He who stifles free discussion secretly doubts whether what he professes to believe is really true. Coleridge says, See how triumphant in debate and notion O'Connell is! Why? Because he asserts a broad principle, acts up to it, rests his body on it, and has faith in it. Coworker with Father Mathew; champion of the dissenters; advocating the substantial principles of the Charter, though not a Chartist; foe of the corn-laws; battling against slavery, whether in India or the Carolinas; the great democrat who in Europe seventy years ago called the people to his side; starting a movement of the peo
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, William Lloyd Garrison (1879). (search)
g them the man whose career, fairly examined, exhibits fewer miscalculations and fewer mistakes than this career which is just ended. I know what I claim. As Mr. Weld has said, I am speaking to-day to men who judge by their ears, by rumors; who see, not with their eyes, but with their prejudices. History, fifty years hence, dispelling your prejudices, will do justice to the grand sweep of the orbit which, as my friend said, to-day we are hardly in a position, or mood, to measure. As Coleridge avers, The truth-haters of to-morrow will give the right name to the truth-haters of to-day, for even such men the stream of time bears onward. I do not fear that if my words are remembered by the next generation they will be thought unsupported or extravagant. When history seeks the sources of New England character, when men begin to open up and examine the hidden springs and note the convulsions and the throes of American life within the last half century, they will remember Parker, th
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Standard and popular Library books, selected from the catalogue of Houghton, Mifflin and Co. (search)
h $1.00. Synnove Solbakken. Arne. The Bridal March. Magnhild. A Happy Boy. The Fisher Maiden. Captain Mansana. British Poets. Riverside Edition. In 68 volumes, crown 8vo, cloth, gilt top, per vol. $1.75; the set, 68 volumes, cloth, $100.00. Akenside and Beattie, I vol. Ballads, 4 vols. Burns, I vol. Butler, I vol. Byron, 5 vols. Campbell and Falconer, i vol. Chatterton, I vol. Chaucer, 3 vols. Churchill, Parnell, and Tickell, 2 vols. Coleridge and Keats, 2 vols. Cowper, 2 vols. Dryden, 2 vols. Gay, I vol Goldsmith and Gray, I vol. Herbert and Vaughan, I vol. Herrick, I vol. Hood, 2 vols. Milton and Marvell, 2 vols. Montgomery, 2 vols. Moore, 3 vols. Pope and Collins, 2 vols. Prior, i vol. Scott, 5 vols. Shakespeare and Jonson, I vol. Chatterton, I vol. Shelley, 2 vols. Skelton and Donne, 2 vols. Southey, 5 vols. Spenser, 3 vols. Swift, 2 vols. Thomson, I vol. Watt
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 3: Apprenticeship.—1818-1825. (search)
who put his editorials in type, and in whom, as a bright and promising lad, he took a friendly interest, was destined to prove his assertion that colonization was impossible, and gradual emancipation impracticable, and to show the only right and safe way to cure a gigantic evil. And no more did the boy himself realize for what work he was marked out. He knew not that his chosen hand, Made strong by God, his native land Would rescue from the shameful yoke Of Slavery—the which he broke! Coleridge, after Stolberg's Tell's Birthplace. For the next two years current polities chiefly were the theme of his anonymous contributions to the press. In March and April, 1823, under the signature of One of the People, he wrote three articles for the Herald March 14, and April 1 and 4, 1823. under the title of Our Next Governor, and warmly advocated the election of Harrison Gray Otis, as one who, in the numerous positions which he had already occupied, had conferred lasting honor on Mass
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 14: Poe (search)
ainable by the novel. Works of Poe, ed. Harrison, Vol. XI, p. x08. Scarcely less famous are some of his deliverances on the meaning and the province and aims of poetry. Poetry he defined as the rhythmical creation of beauty, holding with Coleridge, his chief master as critic, that its immediate object is pleasure, not truth; and that with the intellect or with the conscience it has only collateral relations. Poetry and passion he held to be discordant. And humour, also, he believed to st be included the earlier lines To Helen, Israfel, The city in the sea, the Sleeper, The Haunted Palace, Dream-Land, The Raven, Ulalume, For Annie, and Annabel Lee. And most of his earlier verses are manifestly imitative, Byron and Moore and Coleridge and Shelley being his chief models; while much of his earlier work, including all of the volume of 1827, and some of his latest— notably the verses addressed to Mrs. Osgood and Mrs. Shew and Mrs. Lewis—are either fragmentary and incondite or me
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
Their thought is developed by Shaftesbury and the benevolists; favoured by Berkeley; much re-enforced by the works of Paley, and by Butler's Analogy; and developed again in various directions by Rousseau, William Godwin, and, later, Kant and Coleridge. They are the liberals, transcendentalists, and romantics, and Plato is their ultimate master, though he contributes his realism to their opponents. The tough-minded derive from Aristotle, St. Augustine, and, of course, Calvin; find themselveshnell thus works rapprochements everywhere. His thought holds all subjects suspended in a sort of Platonic solvent, conciliating opposites— not without sometimes confusing them. Yet he continues with vigour the tradition of Plato, Hegel, and Coleridge, and is a genuine religious thinker, whose importance in the history of American thought has perhaps not been generally recognized. In many ways he suggests William James. Moreover, he has a style, nervous, clean, and racy. Kept fresh by its
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
e, Thomas, 286 Clarkson, Thomas, 45 Clay, Henry, 45, 50, 71, 86-88, 90, 93 n., 116, 135 Clemens, S. L., 157, 159, 360, 363, 379, 405, 406 Clemm, Virginia, 58, 58 n. Cleveland plain dealer, the, 158 Clouds in the West, 306 Cobbett, Wm., 181 Cobwebs from an empty Skull, 387 Coercion, 305 Coffin, Charles Carleton, 404 Coffin, Joshua, 44 Cogswell, Joseph G., 111 Cohens vs. Virginia, 74 Coke, Sir, Edward, 77 Coleman, William, 184 Colenbrander, H. T., 146 Coleridge, 65, 66, 197, 213 College of California, 212 Colonial ballads, 311 Columbia, 298 Columbian Centinel, 180 Columbian magazine, the, 114, 161, 368 Columbus, 128, 254 Columbus, 128 Commemoration ode, 252, 256, 279, 303 Commentaries on American law, 77 Commentaries on the Constitution, 76, 77 Commercial Advertiser. See Minerva, 180 Compendious history of New England, 109 Confederate flag, the, 309 Conflict of laws, 77 Congdon, Charles T., 192 Connecticut Cou
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