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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), chapter 1.9 (search)
national literature was undiminished, though it was perhaps becoming more intelligent. Within a few years Americans were gratified by finding that in Irving and Cooper they had at least two authors who were highly appreciated abroad, and before 1850 many of the more distinguished writers of the century had established their repuof the early time were Miss Sedgwick, James Gates Percival, Richard Henry Wilde, Mrs. Sigourney, William Gilmore Simms, J. G. Whittier, Horace Greeley, and James Fenimore Cooper. The importance of The Knickerbocker magazine may be judged by this list of names; yet in dignity of tone and especially in the quality of its humour it wus tradition its decline began when Graham published a harshly unfavourable review of Uncle Tom's cabin. Among the contributors to Graham's in its best days were Cooper, Longfellow, Lowell, Hawthorne, and Simms. Most of the Southern magazines were still conducted in a spirit of patriotism and local literary pride, rather than
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 21: Newspapers, 1775-1860 (search)
ting, he began to supersede the contributors of essays as the strongest writer on the paper. Much of the best writing, and of the rankest scurrility, be it said, was produced by editors born and trained abroad, like Bache of the Aurora, Cobbett, Cooper, Gales, Cheetham, Callender, Lyon, and Holt. Of the whole number of papers in the country towards the end of the decade, more than one hundred and fifty, at least twenty opposed to the administration were conducted by aliens. The power wielded by these anti-administration editors impressed John Adams, who in 1801 wrote: If we had been blessed with common sense, we should not have been overthrown by Philip Freneau, Duane, Callender, Cooper, and Lyon, or their great patron and protector. A group of foreign liars encouraged by a few ambitious native gentlemen have discomfited the education, the talents, the virtues, and the prosperity of the country. The most obvious example of that Federalist lack of common sense was the passage of
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 4: the New South: Lanier (search)
ns of publication were multiplied and made more available did it take on the natural tones of everyday use. Poetry in the seventies tended to give way to prose fiction. See Book III, Chaps. VI and XI. Of course, those who had written before the war still tried to gain a livelihood from the pen, but they continued the manner and traditions of the Old South. John Esten Cooke, See also Book III, Chap. XI. for example, carried on in Virginia the tradition of the school of Scott and Cooper, then elsewhere becoming archaic. George William Bagby (1828-83), See also Book II, Chap. XIX. also of Virginia, renewed his newspaper productions and added the lyceum to his resources. But so intense a lover of the Old Dominion and its civilization could suffer no sea-change even in the fiery baptism of war. He tried to deliver his lecture The Virginia negro in New York, but the reception was unmistakably cool. Life befoa de war had not yet become for the North a charming memory from
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 5: dialect writers (search)
e his specialty, he is none the less willing to comment on negroes before and after the war, his favourite dishes, revivals, courtship, Christmas, witches, and religion. These are some of the elemental things about which his thoughts play and through which we come at last to know him and to revere him. Nowhere in American literature has an author succeeded better in harmonizing a typical character with an individual character than has been done in the character of Uncle Remus. What James Fenimore Cooper did for the Indian, Harris has in fact done for the negro. Just as Chingachgook is the last of the Mohicans, so Uncle Remus is the last of the old-time negroes. In literature he is also the first. But Uncle Remus is interesting not merely in himself but also for the folk-tales of which he is the mouthpiece. These tales mark indeed the beginning of the scientific study of negro folk-lore in America. The author had, however, no ethnological purpose in publishing the Uncle Remus
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: the short story (search)
n as the local colour school —in 1870 were just beginning to find themselves, and they fell under the spell of Harte just as Longfellow and his circle in earlier days had fallen under the spell of Irving. It was not until the eighties and the early nineties that the tide which had begun in The Overland monthly in 1868 came to its full. Perhaps the most interesting transition during the period is that which may be traced in the work of Constance Fenimore Woolson (1838-94), a grandniece of Cooper, a native of New Hampshire, and a dweller successively by the Great Lakes, in the South, and in Italy, where she died. At the beginning of the seventies Miss Woolson was writing unlocalized poetic stories for Harper's, A Merry Christmas, An October idyl, and the like, tales that might have come from the early period of Rose Terry Cooke. But soon one notes a change, a new sense of the value of background and of strongly individualized types for characters. By 1874 she was choosing the West
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 7: books for children (search)
tiffness, and Abbott showed genuine lightness of touch. Their enormous sales prove their attractiveness; and Noah Brooks, himself an important juvenile writer, has recorded that, however tame they seemed later, they were thrilling in interest compared with all previous juveniles. Although before the end of the nineteenth century America was to lead the world in its special literature for children, the chief authors of the first half of the century did not intentionally contribute to it. Cooper's stories I See also Book II, Chap. VI. bequeathed to a later generation the Indian, the Yankee Trader, and the Scout; but neither he nor Irving I See also Book II, Chap. IV. in Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle, nor Dana in the book that still remains one of the most popular with boys, Interesting evidence of the simplicity and straightforwardness of the style of Two years before the Mast, which like that of Robinson Crusoe so commended it to boys, is found in the fact that quotat
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
cticut Courant, the, 178, 180 Connection between taste and morals, the, 220 Conquered Banner, the, 291, 299, 304, 309 Conqueror Worm, the, 65, 67 Conquest of Mexico, the, 128, 129, 130, 136 Conquest of of Peru, the, 129, 130 Contentment, 239 Contos do Brazil, 356 n. Conversations on some of the old poets, 246, 252 Conway, Moncure D., 267 Cooke, John Esten, 316 Cooke, R. P., 68 n. Cooke, Rose Terry, 364, 372, 373, 381, 382, 388, 401 Cooley, Thos. M., 76 Cooper, James Fenimore, 163, 167, 168, 316, 356, 381, 401 Cooper, Thomas, 181 Copeland, C. T., 388 Coplas de Manrique, 40 Copperhead, the, 286 Copperhead Convention, the, 286 Corn, 337, 343 Correspondence of the American Revolution, the, 117 Cortes, Hernando, 128, 129 Cotter's Saturday night, the, 50, 353 Cotton, John, 396 Cotton boll, the, 293, 309 Countryman, the, 348, 350 Courier (Louisville), 296 Courier and Enquirer, 183, 187, 193 Courtship of Miles Standish and other
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
of Parliament whereby a duty is laid . . . on Molasses, 428 Conspiracy of Pontiac, 189 Constance Trescott, 90 Constitutional history of England, 197 Constitutional view of the late War between the States, 182 Contrast, the, 493 Control of Trusts, the, 442 Convict 999, 287 Convito, 488 Conway, Moncure D., 120 Cook, Joseph, 210 Cooke, John Esten, 67-68, 69 Cooke, P. St. George, 143 Cooke, Rose Terry, 86 Coolen Bawn, the, 511 Coomassie and Magdala, 163 Cooper, James Fenimore, 6, 66, 67. 68, 85, 89, 190, 227, 520, 549, 550 551, 563, 579 Cooper, Peter, 348 Cooper, Thomas, 433 Copernicus, 524 Copley, John, 498 Corea, The Hermit Nation, 155 Corleone, 88 Cormon, 271 Corneille, 591 Cornell, 41, 177, 354, 479 Corplanter, 154 Coronado, 621 Corruptions of Christianity, 521 Cosi Fan Tutte, 449 Cosmopolitan, 316 Cost of a national crime, the, 363 Cost the limit of price, 437 Cotton is King, 341 Cotton Kingdom, the,
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, Note (search)
Note The two papers in this volume which bear the titles A Keats manuscript and A Shelley manuscript are reprinted by permission from a work called Book and heart, by Thomas Wentworth Higginson, copyright, 1897, by Harper and Brothers, with whose consent the essay entitled One of Thackeray's women also is published. Leave has been obtained to reprint the papers on Brown, Cooper, and Thoreau, from Carpenter's American prose, copyrighted by the Macmillan Company, 1898. My thanks are also due to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences for permission to reprint the papers on Scudder, Atkinson, and Cabot; to the proprietors of Putnam's magazine for the paper entitled Emerson's foot-note person ; to the proprietors of the New York Evening post for the article on George Bancroft from The nation ; to the editor of the Harvard graduates' magazine for the paper on Gottingen and Harvard ; and to the editors of the Outlook for the papers on Charles Eliot Norton, Julia Ward Howe, Edward E
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises, V. James Fenimore Cooper (search)
words in which Fitz-Greene Halleck designated Cooper's substantial precedence in American novel-wrihe facts, yet claims to speak with authority. Cooper went even beyond these professional absentees,ise other countries at the expense of America, Cooper, with heroic impartiality, dispraised all coune their memory; but for Lowell's keener shaft, Cooper has written six volumes to show he's as good arkman and Palfrey, for instance, the Indian of Cooper vanishes and seems wholly extinguished; but un this, which Professor Lounsbury attributes to Cooper's Quaker ancestry, was in truth a part of the -jointed plots are also shared with Scott, but Cooper knows as surely as his rival how to hold the r see that it is this very habit which has made Cooper's Indian a permanent figure in literature, whi of buttons and tobacco pipes as fearlessly as Cooper, said of The Pathfinder, Never did the art of ary landscape painters. He says elsewhere: If Cooper had succeeded in the painting of character to [13 more...]
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