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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Appomattox campaign. (search)
C.,----. Beale's Brigade, Capt. S. H. Burt: 9th Va.,----; 10th Va.,----; 13th Va.,----; 14th Va.,----. Roberts's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William P. Roberts: 4th N. C.,----; 16th N. C. Batt'n,----. Rosser's division, Maj.-Gen. Thomas L. Rosser. Dearing's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James Dearing, Col. A. W. Harman: 7th Va.,----; 11th Va.,----; 12th Va., Col. A. W. Harman; 35th Va. Batt'n,----. McCausland's Brigade: 16th Va.,----; 17th Va.,----; 21st Va.,----; 22d Va.,----. artillery, Lieut.-Col. R.Brig.-Gen. James Dearing, Col. A. W. Harman: 7th Va.,----; 11th Va.,----; 12th Va., Col. A. W. Harman; 35th Va. Batt'n,----. McCausland's Brigade: 16th Va.,----; 17th Va.,----; 21st Va.,----; 22d Va.,----. artillery, Lieut.-Col. R. B. Chew. Chew's Battalion: Va. Battery (Graham's),----; Va. Battery (McGregor's),----. Breathed's Battalion, Maj. James Breathed: Va. Battery (P. P. Johnston's),----; Va. Battery (Shoemaker's),----; Va. Battery (Thomson's), G. W. C. Lee's division, Maj.-Gen. G. W. Custis Lee. [Composed of Barton's and Crutchfield's brigades, with Tucker's naval battalion attached.] The following battalions of artillery, borne on Lee's return for January 31st, 1865, are not enumerated in the parole lis
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
General John Gregg Killed at Darbytown Road. Brigadier-General Stephen Elliott, Jr Mortally wounded. Killed at Petersburg. Brigadier-General Victor J. Girardey Killed at Petersburg. Brigadier-General Archibald Gracie, Jr Killed at Petersb'g Trenches. Brigadier-General John Adams Killed at Franklin. Brigadier-General Oscar F. Strahl Killed at Franklin. Brigadier-General S. R. Gist Killed at Franklin. Brigadier-General H. B. Granberry Killed at Franklin. Brigadier-General James Dearing Killed at High Bridge. The record of casualties in the Confederate Navy is not a startling one. Nevertheless, the Confederate seamen, in every action, fought their slips to the last extremity, and made a record which, for heroism, skill, and enterprise, will challenge tie attention of the historical student as long as the story of the war is told. With crippled resources, and under discouraging circumstances, vessels were constructed which revolutionized the entire sys
ue soldier and a brave man. He is an example rarely to be met. Lieutenants Richardson and Whittington, both with this battery in the engagement of the 18th, were in this battle, and bravely did their duty. Lieut. W. M. Owen, adjutant, and Lieut. James Dearing, Virginia forces attached to this battalion, accompanied me. To them I am indebted for invaluable service upon the field; frequently were they ordered to positions of great danger, and promptly and bravely did they each acquit themselves oy Major J. B. Walton in person, gave the enemy about this time a parting salute. With the aid of our glass, which was more powerful than his own, he observed the carriage of a gun some two miles off. He gave the order for another fire, and Lieut. Dearing pointed the piece. Before the ball had well reached the point aimed at, a whole regiment of the enemy appeared in sight, going at double-quick down the Centreville road. Major Walton immediately ordered another shot to help them along, as h
among the officers alone. The slaughter among the privates was terrific. The Lynchburgh artillery, formerly known as Latham's battery, now commanded by Captain James Dearing, did good service in the fight. The men fought bravely and laid many a Yankee upon the ground. Capt. Dearing entered with thirty-four cannoneers, and hadCapt. Dearing entered with thirty-four cannoneers, and had nineteen wounded. He also had between thirty and forty horses disabled. The First Lieutenant, James L. Dickenson, had his leg broken. Capt. Dearing is a brave and efficient young officer, and won his spurs on this occasion. One of the batteries captured was the Empire battery, of New-York, Capt. Miller. The guns were new braCapt. Dearing is a brave and efficient young officer, and won his spurs on this occasion. One of the batteries captured was the Empire battery, of New-York, Capt. Miller. The guns were new brass field-pieces, known as the Napoleon gun, made by the American Manufacturing Company. The horses were all killed, but the pieces have been turned over to Captain Miller, of the Washington artillery. Col. D. G. Goodwin, of the Ninth Virginia, was severely wounded. The Petersburgh corps was badly used up. The Twelfth Virginia
for duty, had 52 killed and 140 wounded. At Charleston Harbor, the 21st South Carolina lost 14 killed and 112 wounded, and the 25th South Carolina 16 killed and 124 wounded. At the bloody battle of Chickamauga, Alabama regiments suffered great losses. Confederate generals killed in battle— group no. 8— Brigadier-generals Archibald Gracie, Jr. Petersburg trenches December 2, 1864. John Adams, Franklin November 30, 1864. H. B. Granbury, Franklin November 30, 1864. James Dearing, high Bridge April 6, 1865. John Dunovant, Vaughn Road, October 1, 1864. John Gregg, Darbytown Road, October 7, 1864. Stephen Elliott, Jr., Petersburg died in 1864. Oscar F. Strahl, Franklin November 30, 1864. Archibald C. Godwin, Opequon September 19, 1864. S. R. Gist, Franklin November 30, 1864. Victor J. Girardey, Petersburg August 16, 1864. Casualties of fifty Confederate regiments From fox's Regimental losses in the Civil War showing remarkable percentages of
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), General officers of the Confederate Army: a full roster compiled from the official records (search)
., July 26, 1864. Sanders, J. C. C., May 31, 1864. Sharp, Jacob H., July 26, 1864. Shelley, Chas. M., Sept. 17, 1864. Smith, T. B., July 29, 1864. Sorrell, G. Moxley, Oct. 27, 1864. Terrill, James B., May 31, 1864. Terry, Wm. R., May 31, 1864. Toon, Thomas F., May 31, 1864. Wallace, Wm. H., Sept. 20, 1864. York, Zebulon, May 31, 1864. Young, Wm. H., Aug. 15, 1864. Brigadier-generals, for service with volunteer troops (with temporary rank) Armstrong, F. C., Jan. 20, 1863. Dearing, James, April 29, 1864. Thomas, Bryan M., Aug. 4, 1864. The following were assigned to duty as general officers by Gen. E. Kirby Smith commanding the Trans-Mississippi Department, and served as such. Green, Cullen. Gordon, B. Frank. Harrison, G. P. J. Jackman, S. D. Lewis, Leven M. Maclay, Robt. P. Munford, Thomas T. Pearce, N. B. Randall, Horace. Assigned to duty as brigadier-general by Major-General Fitzhugh Lee and served as such though not appointed by the President or
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of seven Pines-report of General James Longstreet. (search)
hey need no praise from my lips. A truer, better body of men never marched upon a battle-field. I will mention, however, as distinguished for their usual gallantry and ability, Generals R. H. Anderson, C. M. Wilcox, Geo. E. Pickett, R. E. Colston, R. A. Pryor, and Colonels Kemper and Jenkins (commanding brigades), and Colonels Corse, Winston, Funston and Sydenham Moore--the latter twice shot, once severely wounded. I desire also to mention the conspicuous courage and energy of Captain James Dearing, of the Lynchburg artillery, and his officers and men. His pieces were served under the severest fire, as his serious loss will attest. Captain Carter, of General Hill's division, also displayed great gallantry and skill in the management of his battery. My personal staff--Majors G. M. Sorrel, J. W. Fairfax, P. T. Manning, and Captains Thomas Goree, Thomas Walton, and my young aid, Lieutenant R. W. Blackwell--have my kind thanks for their activity, zeal and intelligence in carryi
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Dearing, James, 1840- (search)
Dearing, James, 1840- Soldier; born in Campbell county, Va., April 25, 1840; graduated at Hanover Academy; became a cadet at West Point, but at the outbreak of the Civil War resigned to join the Confederate army, in which he gained the rank of brigadier-general. He took part in the principal engagements between the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia, and was mortally wounded in a singular encounter with Brig.-Gen. Theodore Read, of the National army. The two generals agained the rank of brigadier-general. He took part in the principal engagements between the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia, and was mortally wounded in a singular encounter with Brig.-Gen. Theodore Read, of the National army. The two generals at the head of their respective forces met on opposite sides of the Appomattox in April, 1865, and in a pistol fight which ensued Read was shot dead and Dearing was so severely wounded that he died soon afterwards in Lynchburg, Va.
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Brigadier-Generals of the Confederate States Army, alphabetically arranged. (search)
Davis, &c., with rank of Colonel. 100Davis, ReubenMississippiGen. A. S. Johnston    In command of sixty-day troops from Mississippi, at Bowling Green, Kentucky. 101Davis, W. G. M.FloridaGen. E. K. SmithNov. 4, 1862.Nov. 4, 1862.April 22, 1863. Brigade composed of 1st regiment Florida cavalry and 6th and 7th regiments of Florida infantry, and Martin's [afterwards McCant's] Light Battery; in spring of 1863 commanded the Department of East Tennessee; resigned the latter part of 1863. 102Dearing, JamesVirginiaMaj. Gen. Pickett1864.1864.1864. In command of a cavalry brigade, Army of Northern Virginia; Killed at High Bridge. 103Deas, Zach. C.AlabamaGen. J. E. JohnstonDec. 20, 1862.Dec. 13, 1862.April 22, 1863. Brigade composed of the 19th, 22d, 25th, 26th, 39th and 50th Alabama regiments and Dent's Light Battery; Withers' division, Polk's corps, Army of Tennessee. 104DeBray, X. B.TexasGen. E. K. SmithApril 13, 1864.April 8, 1864.  Brigade composed of the 23d, 26th and 32d regiments T
alion: Claiborne, James R., major; Dunn, Ambrose C., lieutenant-colonel. Thirty-seventh Infantry regiment: Carson, Robert P., lieutenant-colonel; Fulkerson, Samuel V., colonel; Terry, John F., lieutenant-colonel; Williams, Titus V., major, colonel; Wood, Henry C., major. Thirty-seventh Militia regiment: Coles, Thomas R., major; Downing, Joseph, major; Littrell, Leroy N., lieutenant-colonel; Straughan, Samuel L., colonel. Thirty-eighth Artillery battalion: Blount, Joseph G., major; Dearing, James, major; Read, John P. W., major; Stribling, Robert M., major. Thirty-eighth Infantry regiment: Cabell, Joseph R., major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Carrington, Isaac H., major; Edmonds, Edward C., colonel; Griggs, George K., major, lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Lee, Henderson L., major; Martin, George A., lieutenant-colonel; Whittle, Powhatan Boiling, lieutenant-colonel. Thirty-ninth Cavalry battalion: Richardson, John H., major. Thirty-ninth Infantry regiment (disbanded Ja
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