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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and explorers, 1583-1763 (search)
st English colony. And this is as much as my memory can call to mind worthie of note; which I have purposely collected, to satisfie my friends of the true worth and qualitie of Virginia. So John Smith wrote at the end of his Description of that colony published in 1612. Yet some bad natures will not sticke to slander the Countrey, that will slovenly spit at all things, especially in company where they can find none to contradict them. Who though they were scarse ever 10 miles from James Town, or at the most but at the falles; yet holding it a great disgrace that amongst so much action, their actions were nothing, exclaime of all things, though they never adventured to knowe any thing; nor ever did any thing but devoure the fruits of other mens labours. Being for most part of such tender educations and small experience in martiall accidents, because they found not English cities, nor such faire houses, nor at their owne wishes any of their accustomed dainties, with feather
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: Franklin (search)
inclined to identify this contribution with the first of fourteen humorous papers with Latin mottoes signed Silence Dogood, which appeared fortnightly in The New England Courant from March to October, 1722. In this year Benjamin was in charge of the Courant during his brother's imprisonment for printing matter offensive to the Assembly; and when, on repetition of the offence, the master was forbidden to publish his journal, it was continued in the name of the apprentice. In this situation James became jealous and overbearing, and Benjamin became insubordinate. When it grew evident that there was not room enough in Boston for them both, the younger brother left his indentures behind, and in 1723 made his memorable flight to Philadelphia. Shortly after his arrival in the Quaker city, he found employment with the second printer in Philadelphia, Samuel Keimer, a curious person who kept the Mosaic law. In 1724, encouraged by the facile promises of Governor Keith, Franklin went to En
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 1: travellers and observers, 1763-1846 (search)
ddressing you from the farther side of the Atlantic .... As an eloquent and powerful advocate, you have pleaded the cause of humanity in espousing that of the poor Africans; you viewed these provinces of North America in their true light, as the asylum of freedom, as the cradle of future nations, and the refuge of distressed Europeans. Of the twelve, the Introductory Letter is intentionally rambling. A former European guest having asked for a detailed account of colonial life, neighbour James seeks counsel of the minister, who tells him: He that shall write a letter every day of the week will on Saturday perceive the sixth flowing from his pen much more readily than the first. But the Farmer's wife dissuades him, unless the plan be followed secretly, so as not to arouse gossip. A chance allusion to the speeches of friend Edmund, that is, of Burke, accords with the attention to style in the letters that follow. If they be not elegant, says the minister, they will smell of the w
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 8: transcendentalism (search)
been may be seen by glancing at three of her foremost spiritual figures: Jonathan Edwards, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and William James (James, curiously enough, though a New Englander only by adoption, being scarcely less representative of the most recJames, curiously enough, though a New Englander only by adoption, being scarcely less representative of the most recent phase of New England religious evolution than Emerson and Edwards were of two of its earlier stages). Edwards, the last great apostle of theocratic dogmatism; Emerson, the prophet of a generation of romantic aspiration; James, the pragmatic philJames, the pragmatic philosopher of a scientific and democratic age-how far apart, at first thought, they seem! And not merely far apart, but often hostile. Emerson gave much of his best effort to demolishing the remnants of the Calvinistic structure Edwards had done so much to fortify. James's career was one long assault on that philosophy of the Absolute which is the intellectualized counterpart of the religion of the Over-Soul. The respective attitudes of the three men toward nature well illustrate their differ
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index. (search)
enezer, 248, 251 Irving, John Treat, 251 Irving, Peter, 220, 248 Irving, Pierre, 259 Irving, Washington, 185, 191, 194, 208, 209, 21O, 233, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 241, 242, 243, 245-259, 264, 272, 276, 309, 310, 311, 318, 324 Irving, William, 246, 247 Isaac Bickerstaff, 111, 233 Isabella, Queen of Spain, 257 Israel Potter, 323 Italian sketch Book, an, 243 J Jack Cade, 222, 224 Jack Tier, 302 Jackson, Andrew, 186, 190, 222, 313 Jackson, Richard, 97 James, William, 348 Jane Talbot, 292 Jay, John, 91, 135, 144, 146, 148, 149, 294 Jefferson, Joseph (elder), 221, 231 Jefferson, (younger), 231 Jefferson, Thomas, 91, 129, 141, 142, 143, 146, 175, 185, 190, 194, 199, 201, 202, 203, 205 Jeffrey, Lord, 90, 248 Jenyns, Soame, 129 Jesus, 268, 353 Jeune Indienne, La, 188 Joan D'arc, 226 John Bull in America, etc., 208 John Oldbug, 234 Johnson, Captain, Edward, 22-23 Johnson, Dr. Samuel (1709-84), 70, 82, 94, 233, 288
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 1: the Puritan writers (search)
n Mather's writing, even as they are the traits common to that perverse and detestable literary mood that held sway in different countries of Christendom during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Its birthplace was Italy; New England was its grave; Cotton Mather was its last great apostle. However true this may be of Mather at his worst, it is certain that at times he did succeed, like Anne Bradstreet, in forgetting his artifice, and in producing passages of noble prose. Professor William James, after quoting that exquisite passage in which Cotton Mather bids farewell to his young wife, lying dead in the house with her two young children, also dead, finds in it the impulse to sacrifice only. We may see in it also the impulse to expression which, ultimately developed, creates literature. ProfessorWendell says truly of Mather that he frequently wrote with a rhythmical beauty which recalls the enthusiastic spontaneity of Elizabethan English, so different from the English wh
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Index. (search)
rion, Longfellow's, 140, 141. I fill this Cup, Pinkney's, 216. In a summer evening, Harriet Prescott Spofford's, 264. Indian Burying-ground, Freneau's, 36. Ingraham, Joseph Holt, 129. Innocents abroad, Mark Twain's, 248. Irving, Washington, 83-92, 94, 119, 140, 142, 161, 240. I sing the body Electric, Whitman's, 230. I slept and dreamed that life was beauty, Mrs. Hooper's, 264. Israfel, Poe's, 212. Jackson, Helen, 126-128, 264. James, Henry, 161, 246, 249-251. James, William, 18. James River Massacre, 9. Jane Talbot, Brown's, 70. Jay, John, 40, 53. Jefferson, Thomas, 46, 48, 80, 82, 221. Jeffrey, Lord, 69, 82. Jewett, Sarah Orne, 253. Joan of Arc, Mark Twain's, 248. Johnson, Dr., Samuel, 57, 67, 216. Johnston, Lady, 53. Jonson, Ben, 174. Josh Billings, 242, 243. Keats, John, 225, 279. Kenton, Simon, 237. Kerr, Orpheus C., 243. King, Clarence, 278. Kirkland, Mrs. Caroline M., 240. Knickerbocker literature, 106. Knickerbocker maga
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 22: divines and moralists, 1783-1860 (search)
in both (Nature and the supernatural, 1858). Without being a compromiser, Bushnell thus works rapprochements everywhere. His thought holds all subjects suspended in a sort of Platonic solvent, conciliating opposites— not without sometimes confusing them. Yet he continues with vigour the tradition of Plato, Hegel, and Coleridge, and is a genuine religious thinker, whose importance in the history of American thought has perhaps not been generally recognized. In many ways he suggests William James. Moreover, he has a style, nervous, clean, and racy. Kept fresh by its antiseptic virtue, his Literary Varieties—the volumes of essays entitled Work and play (1864), and Moral uses of dark things (1868) and Building Eras in religion (1881)—will still richly reward a reader. Indeed, all of Bushnell's prose, though manifestly influenced by Emerson, by Carlyle, and by Ruskin, yet possesses its own peculiar vitality, a pulsation that at its best may be likened, to use a metaphor of his o
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 6: the short story (search)
ting fourteen stories to the Atlantic alone, and he brought to his work not only the best art America had evolved, but the best of England and France as well. He was a scientist, an observer, a tabulator, as cool and accurate as even his brother William James, the psychologist. Unlike O'Brien and the others, he threw away completely the machinery of the mid-century tale—not without regret it would appear from his Romance of certain old Clothes and other early tales—and sought only the uncoloued by a thousand subtle hints, descriptive touches, insinuations. Under such conditions the movement of the story must be slow: in some of his work there seems to be no story at all, only the analysis of a situation. The method requires space: James has stretched the length of the short story to its extreme. The Aspern papers, the bare story of which could have been told in three pages, dragged through three magazine instalments. Twenty-eight of the one hundred and three stories in Henry J
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
, 162 Isabella, Queen, 125 Isle of La Belle Riviere, 266 n. Isocrates, 96 Israfel, 65, 67 Itineraries, 201 n. Jack Downing. See Smith, Seba Jackson, Amelia Lee, 227 Jackson, Andrew, 45, 87, 88, 89, 90, 111, 120, 150, 151, 183, 291 Jackson, Helen Hunt, 383 Jackson, Henry Rootes, 290, 299 Jackson, Dr., James, 226 Jackson, T. J. (Stonewall), 283, 290, 299, 300, 302, 307 Jacobs, Joseph, 357 n. James, Henry, 18, 293, 374-376, 377, 380, 381, 384, 386, 387 James, William, 213, 375 Janvier, Thomas A., 388 Japikse, N., 146 Jay, John, 180 Jeanette, 381 Jefferson, 84, 93 n., 105, 111, 180, 183, 201 Jeffersonian, 191 Jerrold, Douglas, 148 Jespersen, Professor, 365 Jewett, Sarah Orne, 382-383, 364, 390, 402 Jolly old pedagogue, 242 John Brown's body, 279, 285 John Burns of Gettysburg, 284 John Endicott, 39 John of Barneveld, 145, 146 John Phoenix. See Derby, G. H. Johns Hopkins University, 338 Johnson, Andrew, 143, 144,
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