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William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 17: (search)
is own. He said not then, but intimated that he could procure authority from Mr. Davis. I then told him that I had recently had an interview with General Grant and President Lincoln, and that I was possessed of their views. * * * * That the terms that General Grant had given to General Lee's army were certainly most generous and liberal. All this he admitted, but always recurred to the idea of a universal surrender, embracing his own army, that of Dick Taylor in Louisiana and Texas, and of Maury, Forrest, and others in Alabama and Georgia. * * * * Our conversation was very general and extremely cordial, satisfying me that it could have but one result, and that which we all desired, viz.: to end the war as quickly as possible; and, being anxious to return to Raleigh before the news of Mr. Lincoln's assassination could be divulged, on General Johnston's saying that he thought that, during the night, he could procure authority to act in the name of all the Confederate armies in exis
avalanche, struck the enemy left, right, and centre, so nearly simultaneously as to surprise his entire camp. My first order received from you was early in the morning, after the firing on the right had indicated the propriety of directing Colonel Maury, I think (who had been located with a small regiment on a road leading to a ford on Lick Creek), to leave that position and go to the heaviest firing, and to inform General Forrest (then Colonel), who was guarding a ford on Lick Creek, of the removal of Colonel Maury's force. This order was promptly delivered, and I returned to you at Headquarters No. 2, about a quarter of a mile in advance of Shiloh meeting-house; time required to make this trip, judging from distance, two hours. I found you there, and received an order to go into an encampment which had been captured, stop the pillaging which was going on, and organize stragglers and send them forward into line. I executed the order by clearing the camps, placing a guard over t
Masquerade Balls forbidden by the Selectmen of the town, Dec. 30, 1809 Again prohibited by the City Government, May 15, 1848 Become very popular, 1867 One at the Skating Rink, at Tremont street, Feb. 25, 1869 Great German, at Music Hall, Feb. 17, 1873 Discontinued in public by the authorities, 1874 Mather, Cotton Minister of the Second Church, 1689 His Church were one-sixth widows, 1697 Mathew, Father preaching Temperance in Faneuil Hall, July 27, 1849 Maury, Lieut. lectured at the Lowell Institute, Dec. 5, 1850 Maverick, Samuel settled at Noddle's Island, (East Boston,) 1630 Fined for entertaining strangers, 1641 Mayors John Phillips, inaugurated, May 1, 1822 Died, May 29, 1823 Josiah Quincy, inaugurated, May 1, 1823 Died, aged 92 years, July 1, 1864 Mayors Harrison Gray Otis, inaugurated, Jan. 5, 1829 Died, Oct. 28, 1848 Charles Wells, inaugurated, Jan. 2, 1832 Died, June 3, 1866 Theodore Lyman, inaug
quor License, 91-92 Log Cabins, 92 Long Hair, 92 Long Bullets, 92 Lord Ley and others, 92 Lotteries, 92 Louisburg War, 93 Lowell, Col. 93 Lyman Mystery, 93 M. Magistrates, 93 Mail Matter, 93 Maine District, 93 Malls, 93 Manufactory-house, 93 Maps of Boston, 93 Market Day, 93 Market Clerks, 94 Market Houses, 94 Market Places, 94 Marriage, 94 Masonic, 94, 95 Masquerade Balls, 95 Mather, Rev. Cotton 95 Matthew, Father 95 Maury, Lieut 95 Maverick, Samuel 95 Mayors, 95 to 97 Meade, Gen., Geo. C. 97 Meagher, Gen'l 97 Meal-house, 97 Mechanics' Institute, 97 Merchants' Exchange, 97 Meteors, 97 Mexico, City of 97 MeGennisken, Bernard 97 MeClellan, Gen., Geo. B. 97 Milk Inspectors, 97 Military Companies, 97, 98 Mill Dam, 98 Mill Creek, 98 Mill Pond, 98 Mill, Water 98 Mill, Wind 98, 99 Miller, William 99 Mint House, 99 Model Artists, 99 Moody and Sankey, 99 Monuments, 99 Mon
failed, the enemy would not have retreated. This is far from the true state of affairs. As Colonel Maury observes: General Johnston had no intention of tarrying at Williamsburg, nor was the place d for an army to hold, not for a rear guard division fighting for time to save its stores. Colonel Maury, in his article on Williamsburg in Southern Historical Society Papers, seems to overlook thi. General Hill also says in his report, I reconnoitered the ground as well as I could. Colonel Maury, evidently writing without carefully reading these reports, asserts that no reconnaissance wt precision, and there was no such manifest disorder as would justify storming the redoubt. Colonel Maury, of the Virginia regiment, says: Had the regiments been allowed to go on, the redoubt would off down to the cover of the fence, and immediately after I received the order to retire. Colonel Maury in this same article, blames the Confederate commander for not bringing up his whole divisio
narva, the home of his father, Ebenezer Pettigrew, representative in Congress. The family was founded in America by James, youngest son of James Pettigrew, an officer of King William's army, rewarded by a grant of land for gallantry at the battle of the Boyne. Charles, son of the founder, was chosen the first bishop of North Carolina. Young Pettigrew was graduated at the State university in 1847, with such distinction that President Polk, who attended the commencement, accompanied by Commodore Maury, offered the young student one of the assistant professorships in the observatory at Washington. He held this position until 1848, when he began study for the profession of law, which he completed under his distinguished relative, James L. Pettigrew, of South Carolina. After traveling in Europe two years he entered upon the practice of his profession at Charleston, and in 1856 was elected to the South Carolina legislature. In 1859 he again visited Europe and sought to enter the Sard
nly snares. If Lee perceived this situation, he had not the force to impress it on his coadjutors, and therefore lacked the greatness essential in his position at such a crisis. When finally all things were ready and the great blow was struck, it was seen how complete had been the preparations and combinations which had preceded the end; how absolute the execution of the scheme devised a year before. Lee surrendered because he had nothing else to do. He could not run away. Johnston and Maury and Richard Taylor and Kirby Smith surrendered for exactly the same reason. The various victories were not hap-hazard; it was not that each man chanced to come out right. All the arrangements were made in advance. Army after army came up to surrender, like the pieces in chess in a complicated game, when the beaten player has only one move for each, and that to give it away. Nor was it only because of Appomattox, or because they had lost heart, that the lesser rebels yielded. Johnston w
nly snares. If Lee perceived this situation, he had not the force to impress it on his coadjutors, and therefore lacked the greatness essential in his position at such a crisis. When finally all things were ready and the great blow was struck, it was seen how complete had been the preparations and combinations which had preceded the end; how absolute the execution of the scheme devised a year before. Lee surrendered because he had nothing else to do. He could not run away. Johnston and Maury and Richard Taylor and Kirby Smith surrendered for exactly the same reason. The various victories were not hap-hazard; it was not that each man chanced to come out right. All the arrangements were made in advance. Army after army came up to surrender, like the pieces in chess in a complicated game, when the beaten player has only one move for each, and that to give it away. Nor was it only because of Appomattox, or because they had lost heart, that the lesser rebels yielded. Johnston w
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Kentucky (search)
n. Price's troops, comprising the divisions of Maury and Little, consisted of ten thousand five hunovering Davies' left flank; Moore's brigade of Maury's division immediately took advantage of this o concentrate their efforts between Lovell and Maury, and to fall afterward upon their uncovered riccordance with Van Dorn's instructions, joined Maury in his efforts to crush the Federals in the vink it by massing beyond the Jackson Railroad. Maury and Lovell were to support this attack by occudson redoubt. Cabell's brigade, detached from Maury's division, supported this attack, while Greenverse of Davies had uncovered Stanley's right; Maury's Confederate division took advantage of this entered Corinth by the Chewalla road. But all Maury's efforts failed against the position crowned hich had not been destroyed. The remainder of Maury's division, which had just joined Moore, disputhe enemy's column the same disorder as was in Maury's division; but he soon found himself confront[3 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 9 (search)
. Crooker's Brigade, McArthur's Brigade. Division, Davis. Hackelman's brigade, Oliver's brigade, Oglesby's brigade. Cavalry, brigade, ...... Artillery, 16 batteries, 50 guns. Confederate army. Army of the Mississippi, Major-general Van Dorn. Division, Lovell. Villepique's brigade, Rust's brigade, Bowen's brigade. Division, Breckenridge. Brigade, ......; brigade, ......; cavalry, Jackson's brigade. Army of trans-mississippi, Major-general Sterling Price. Division, Maury. Moore's brigade, Phifer's brigade, Cabell's brigade. Division, Hebert. Gates' brigade, Colbert's brigade, Green's brigade, Martin's brigade. Cavalry, Armstrong's brigade. Artillery, 10 batteries, 44 guns. Battle of Murfreesborough. Federal army. Commander-in-chief, Major-General Rosecrans. Left wing. Major-general Crittenden. 1st Division, Wood (6th The figures in parenthesis indicate the permanent numbers of divisions and brigades in the general enumeration
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