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3. Brig.-Genl. R. S. Ripley, Comdg. First Mil. Dist., Charleston, S. C.: General,—In view of the possible contingency of a night reconnoissance by the enemy on Morris or even Sullivan's Island, it is the wish of the General Commanding that you should so dispose your cavalry, for a time at least, that you may be able to place moions with Sumter and Morris Island, his ironclads having command, meanwhile, of the outer harbor? 16th. Was it not a fortunate circumstance the enemy attacked Morris instead of James Island? 17th. From the apparent number of troops and vessels in North Edisto, about the 10th July last, was it not possible for the enemy to , Charleston, S. C.: Sir,—The Commanding General, having to visit James Island with the President this morning, requested me to enclose for your information Major Morris's telegram, which is believed to be reliable in Richmond. He directed me also to say that he hoped, in view of the possible contingency, it would suit your
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
Organized at Indianapolis, Ind., April 22-27, 1861. Left State for Grafton, W. Va., May 30. Attached to Kelly's Command. Action at Philippi June 3. Morris' Indiana Brigade, Army of West Virginia, July. West Virginia Campaign July 6-16. Carrick's Ford July 12-14. Pursuit of Garnett's forces July 15-16. Mul 21-27, 1861. Left State for West Virginia May 29. At Grafton, W. Va., June 1. Attached to Kelly's Command. Action at Philippi June 3. Attached to Morris' Indiana Brigade Army of West Virginia, July. West Virginia Campaign July 6-17. Laurel Hill July 7. Bealington July 8. Carrick's Ford July 12-14. Pd., April 22-27, 1861. Ordered to Grafton, W. Va., May 29. Attached to Kelly's Command, West Virginia, to July. Action at Philippi June 3. Attached to Morris' Indiana Brigade, West Virginia, July. West Virginia Campaign July 6-17. Laurel Hill July 7-8. Bealington July 10. Carrick's Ford July 12-14. Pursu
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, New York Volunteers. (search)
12-13. Bolivar Heights September 14. Surrendered September 15. Paroled September 16, and rejoind Regiment at Baltimore. Regiment attached to Defenses of Baltimore, Md. 8th Army Corps, Middle Department, May, 1862, to February, 1863. Morris' Brigade, 8th Army Corps, to March, 1863. 2nd Separate Brigade, 8th Army Corps, to April, 1864. 3rd Battalion (Cos. I, K, L and M on duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., north and south of the Potomac, 22nd Army Corps, December 31, 18 Md., May 28 to June 5, and duty at Fort Federal Hill June 6 to August 28. Mustered out at New York City September. 5, 1862. Again mustered in for thirty days service June 16, 1863. Left State for Baltimore, Md., June 17. Attached to Morris' Brigade, 8th Army Corps, Middle Department, to July 7. 3rd Division, 3rd Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to July 15. Duty at Fort Federal Hill and provost duty in Baltimore, Md., June 18 to July 5. Ordered to Frederick, Md., July 5, an
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
issance to Franklin on the Blackwater October 3. Ordered to New Berne, N. C., December 4. Foster's Expedition to Goldsboro December 10-21. Southwest Creek December 13-14. Kinston December 14. Whitehall December 16. Goldsboro December 17. Duty at New Berne, N. C., till January, 1863. Moved to Port Royal, S. C., January 28-31. At St. Helena Island, S. C., till April. At Folly Island, S. C., till July. Attack on Morris Island July 10. Assaults on Fort Wagner, Morris, Island, S. C., July 11 and 18. Siege of Forts Wagner and Gregg, Morris Island, and operations against Fort Sumpter and Charleston July 18-September 7. Duty on Morris and Folly Islands operating against Charleston till December. Moved to Hilton Head, S. C., and duty there till April, 1864. Expedition to Whitmarsh Island, Ga., February 22. Moved to Gloucester Point, Va., April. Butler's operations on south side of James River and against Petersburg and Richmond May 4-28.
Isaac O. Best, History of the 121st New York State Infantry, Chapter 1: the organization of the 121st New York Volunteers (search)
, Columbia and Stark. Company C. Fairfield, Russia, Herkimer and Newport. Company D. Frankfort, Warren, Manheim, Schuyler, Columbia and Salisbury. Company E. Middlefield, Milford, Cherry Valley, Hartwick, Springfield, Otego and Roseboom. Company F. Edminston, Exeter, Unadilla, Otego and Maryland. Company G. Cherry Valley, Roseboom, Decatur, Middlefield, Westford, Worcester and Herkimer. Company H. Little Falls, Richfield, Salisbury and Otego. Company I. Milford, Laurens, Morris, Worcester, Pittsfield, Hartwick and German Flats. Company K. Laurens, New Lisbon, Oneonta, Burlington, Otego, Butternuts, Pittsfield and Plainfield. A camp for the regiment was selected across the Mohawk River from Herkimer on German Flats, and named Camp Schuyler. The contract for this camp-site reads as follows: Headquarters Camp Schuyler, August 29, 1862. This agreement, made this 25th day of July, A. D. 1862, between Albert Story, on behalf of the State of New York, as Qua
and Minnesota and quite a lot of gunboats went up that way engaging the battery at Sewall's Point though their fire fell far short of it. The old steam frigate Merrimac had been cut down and iron clad by the Confederates and was whipping our vessels, as they were all wooden ones and could make scarcely any impression on the ironplated monster. After about an hour's hard fighting the Merrimac ran her prow into the Cumberland, causing her to fill with water and rendering her useless. Commodore Morris would not surrender nor haul down the flag but kept at work at the guns till water covered the decks. Night coming on, the Merrimac anchored off Sewall's Point. That was a dark night for us, as with one exception nothing looked hopeful. We were cut off from help landward, the Congress was burned, the Cumberland sunk, the Minnesota was aground and the Roanoke helpless with a broken shaft, while nothing seemed to check the ram at all. About midnight the Congress blew up. Among the dark
61Feb. 15, 1864, re-enlistment. Evans, Elbridge, Corp.,29Boston, Ma.Feb. 16, 1864Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Foster, Thomas B., Corp.,22Boston, Ma.Feb. 16, 1864Died June 6, 1865, New Orleans, La. Green, Charles W., Corp.,26Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Ham, George E., Corp.,26Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Hodgkins, Frederick T., Corp.,21Gloucester, Ma.Dec. 7, 1863Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Hodgkins, Morris, Jr., Corp.,40Gloucester, Ma.Dec. 7, 1863Aug. 11, 1865, expiration of service. Howe, Francis E., Corp.,27Melrose, Ma.July 31, 1861Jan. 8, 1863, disability. Kane, James H., Corp.,23Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Knowlton, Joseph S., Corp.,25Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Knowles, Osgood W., Corp.,25Boston, Ma.July 31, 1861Aug. 16, 1864, expiration of service. Leavitt, Edwin L., Corp.,29Boston, Ma.Oct. 10, 1861Died Aug. 5, 1862,
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Grace Greenwood-Mrs. Lippincott. (search)
world experienced a sensation. A new writer was abroad. A fresh pen was moving along the pages of the Monthlies. Who might it be? Did Willis know? Could General Morris say? Whittierwas in the secret; but he told no tales. And her nom de plume, so appropriate and elegant! This charming Grace Greenwood, so natural, so chatt For six or eight years her summer home was New Brighton. In winter she was in Philadelphia, in Washington, in New York, writing for White tier or for Willis and Morris, or for Neal's Gazette, or for Godey. She was the most copious and brilliant lady correspondent of that day, wielding the gracefullest quill, giving the brighteshere are very few of her sex so able or so eloquent to-day as Grace Greenwood,--we can but endorse this sentiment of one of her earliest admirers. In a letter to Morris, written when Miss Clarke was living this life, and writing these lines, he says: Save her from meriting the approbation of dignified critics. Leave this fairest
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Harriet Beecher Stowe. (search)
; and Professor, and subsequently Major-General 0. M. Mitchell, whom the nation remembers as one of its most accomplished scientific men, and mourns as one of its noblest martyrs in the cause of liberty. In this brilliant circle Mrs. Stowe's genius soon began to shine conspicuously. Some of her contributions to these reunions were received with unaffected wonder and delight. The portraiture of old Father Mills, of Torringford, Conn., which appears in the Mayflower under the title of Father Morris, was greeted with uproarious applause. But her Uncle Tim, written in 1834 for the Semicolon club, and read at one of its sessions, made the deepest impression. And this same sketch, which is still one of the most charming and characteristic productions of her pen, published first in Judge Hall's Magazine, and afterward in the Mayflower, first attracted public attention to her as a writer of great versatility and promise. In this Semicolon club the woman of genius seems to have first
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
mark, and aided in establishing the rule that treaties can be abrogated only by act of Congress. H wrote to Theodore Parker, Jan. 3, 1856:— This evening I dined in the company of several of the judges of the Supreme Court, and in the shuffle for seats at the table found myself next but, one to Curtis Judge B. R. Curtis. throughout a protracted dinner of two or three hours. I had not seen so much of him for years, and make haste to send you the pleasant impressions which I had. Commodore Morris got between me and the judge; Governor Brown of Mississippi, who believes slavery divine, on my left. In the course of our conversation Curtis said that he had not voted since he had been a judge, and he professed entire ignorance of politics and parties. I thought also that he showed it. My conversation with him was so agreeable that I shall call upon him, which I have not done thus far since I have been here in Washington. Again, January 9:— Unjust judges may at least be f
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