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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 14: the greatest battles of the war — list of victories and defeats — chronological list of battles with loss in each, Union and Confederate. (search)
udes Utoy Creek, Aug. 5, 6 (800); and Siege of Atlanta.Atlanta Campaign, Ga 453 2,318 466 3,237 Sept. 1 Jonesboro and Lovejoy's Station.Atlanta Campaign, Ga 277 1,413 212 1,902 May 5-7 Wilderness, Va 2,246 12,037 3,383 17,666 May 8-21 Includes Alsop's Farm, May 8 (loss about 1,800); Po River, Laurel Hill, and Upton's Charge, May 10 (5,000); Hancock's Assault, the Angle, and general attack of May 12 (8,500); Spotsylvania, May 18 (800); Fredericksburg Pike, May 19 (1,400); Todd's Tavern; Corbin's Bridge; Ny River; Guinea Station etc.Spotsylvania, Va 2,725 13,416 2,258 18,399 May 6, 7 Walthall; Chester Station, Va 48 256 70 374 May 9, 10 Arrowfield Church, Va 36 188 19 243 May 12-16 Drewry's Bluff, Va 390 2,380 1,390 4,160 May 18-20 Ware Bottom Church, Va 103 796 49 948 May 21-31 Bermuda Hundred, Va 18 89 21 128 May 7-16 Cavalry engagements.Kautz's Cavalry Raid, Va 14 60 31 105 May 9, 10 Cloyd's Mountain, W. Va 108 508 72 688 May 11 Cavalr
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 4 (search)
the road, finding it again, tearing our clothes among trees and bushes, then coming to cavalry pickets and finally to Todd's Tavern, where General Gregg had his Headquarters, with his division of cavalry camped about there. . . . There was a porch i A little before two we moved Headquarters down the Piney Branch Church road, south, to near its junction with the Todd's Tavern road. Meantime the 6th Corps had come up and formed on the left of Warren, the lines running in a general easterly areme left; Sedgwick and Warren respectively occupied the left and right centre, while Hancock, in the neighborhood of Todd's Tavern, covered the right flank; for you will remember that the Rebel columns were still moving down the Parker's Store roadinforcements. You will notice that the army was gradually shifting to the left, having now given up the Po River and Todd's Tavern road. May 16.--Mott's division, that had hitherto behaved so badly, was broken up and put with Birney — a sad reco
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 9 (search)
dy as ever, issuing orders for the advance, with his eyes wide open, as much as to say; Sleep — don't mention it! At one in the morning, sure enough, he moved; but had not got a mile, when, behold the whole of Merritt's division of cavalry, filing in from a side road, and completely closing the way! That's the way with those cavalry bucks: they bother and howl about infantry not being up to support them, and they are precisely the people who always are blocking up the way; it was so at Todd's Tavern, and here again, a year after. They are arrant boasters, and, to hear Sheridan's Staff talk, you would suppose his ten thousand mounted carbineers had crushed the entire Rebellion. Whereas they are immediately cleaned out, the moment they strike a good force of foot-men, and then they cry wolf merrily. The plain truth is, they are useful and energetic fellows, but commit the error of thinking they can do everything and that no one else does do anything. Well, Humphreys could not stir
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
1. Stuart, James Ewell Brown, 18; death, 125. Summerhayes, John Wyer, 268. Sumner, Charles, 78. Surgeon, English fusileer, 115. Sutherland's station, 339, 341. Swede, a visiting, 41, 63; indignation of a, 262. Sykes, George, 34, 52, 53, 60, 80; visited, 8; at dinner, 72. Ta, the, 119. Thanksgiving Day, 278. Thatcher, Horace Kellogg, 171. Theatre, engineers', 311. Thomas, George Henry, 296. Thomas, Henry Goddard, 211. Thomas, Lorenzo, 290. Thompson, —, 130. Todd's Tavern, 103. Tompkins, Charles H., 112. Townsend, Charles, 22. Trobriand, Philippe Regis de, 256. Trowbridge, —, 312. Tyler, John, 159. Tyler, —, 185. Tyler house, 121. Upton, Emory, 109. Vermont captain, exploit of a, 174. Via's house, 140. Virginia, devastation, 48; houses, 301. Volunteers, 209. Votes, fraudulent, 263. Wadsworth, James Samuel, 90, 180. Wadsworth, Craig, 125. Wainwright, Charles Sheils, 296. Walker, Mary E., 6n. Wall house, 339. Wallace, Lewis, 185<
brigade; remained in this position during the day and night. At two o'clock, on the morning of May first, marched towards Orange Court-House plank road. About one o'clock P. M., formed line of battle on the plank road, about two miles from Todd's Tavern; threw out skirmishers, driving back those of the enemy, and took six prisoners. About six P. M., same day, moved up the dirt road, one mile beyond Todd's Tavern, and bivouacked for the night. About six o'clock A. M., May second, moved up thTodd's Tavern, and bivouacked for the night. About six o'clock A. M., May second, moved up the dirt road about half a mile, filed off to the left on the Furnace Road, arriving at Germana Road about three and a half o'clock P. M., and formed line of battle, left of brigade resting on said road. Brigade formed as follows: Fourth, Forty-fourth, Twenty-first, and Twelfth Georgia; the Fourth Georgia resting on road, skirmishers thrown forward about four hundred yards in advance. At five o'clock P. M., the order was given to advance against the enemy. The brigade moved as rapidly as possi
ssing on account of the intense heat and dust and smoke from the burning forests. The Federal move toward Spotsylvania Court House was begun after dark on the 7th. Warren's corps, in the lead, took the Brock road behind Hancock's position and was followed by Sedgwick, who marched by way of Chancellorsville. Burnside came next, but he was halted to guard the trains. Hancock, covering the move, did not start the head of his command until some time after daylight. When Warren reached Todd's Tavern he found the Union cavalry under Merritt in conflict with Fitzhugh Lee's division of Stuart's cavalry. Warren sent Robinson's division ahead; it drove Fitzhugh Lee back, and, advancing rapidly, met the head of Anderson's troops. The leading brigades came to the assistance of the cavalry; Warren was finally repulsed and began entrenching. The Confederates gained Spotsylvania Court House. Throughout the day there was continual skirmishing between the troops, as the Northerners attemp
ssing on account of the intense heat and dust and smoke from the burning forests. The Federal move toward Spotsylvania Court House was begun after dark on the 7th. Warren's corps, in the lead, took the Brock road behind Hancock's position and was followed by Sedgwick, who marched by way of Chancellorsville. Burnside came next, but he was halted to guard the trains. Hancock, covering the move, did not start the head of his command until some time after daylight. When Warren reached Todd's Tavern he found the Union cavalry under Merritt in conflict with Fitzhugh Lee's division of Stuart's cavalry. Warren sent Robinson's division ahead; it drove Fitzhugh Lee back, and, advancing rapidly, met the head of Anderson's troops. The leading brigades came to the assistance of the cavalry; Warren was finally repulsed and began entrenching. The Confederates gained Spotsylvania Court House. Throughout the day there was continual skirmishing between the troops, as the Northerners attemp
rators on shore. Losses: Union, 23 killed, 48 wounded and gunboat destroyed. May 6-7, 1864: Richmond and Petersburg Railroad, near Chester Station, Va. Union, Portion of Tenth and Eighteenth Corps; Confed., Hagood's Brigade. Losses: Union, 48 killed, 256 wounded; Confed., 50 killed, 200 wounded. May 7, 1864: Bayou La Mourie, La. Union, Portion of Sixteenth Corps; Confed., Gen. Taylor's command. Losses: Union, 10 killed, 31 wounded. May 8, 1864: Todd's Tavern, Va. Union, Sheridan's Cav.; Confed., Stuart's Cav. Losses: Union, 40 killed, 150 wounded; Confed., 30 killed, 150 wounded. May 8-18, 1864: Spotsylvania, Fredericksburg Road, Laurel Hill, and Ny River, Va. Union, Army of the Potomac, Maj.-Gen. Meade; Confed., Army of Northern Virginia, Gen. R. E. Lee. Losses: Union, 2725 killed, 13,416 wounded, 2258 missing; Confed., 1000 killed, 5000 wounded, 3000 missing; Union, Maj.-Gen. Sedgwick and Brig.-Gens. Rice a
change for the better in the condition and morale of his ten thousand men, and was begging to be allowed to use them as an independent corps to fight the Confederate cavalry. Though they had been relieved of much of the arduous picket duty that they formerly performed, they were still considered as auxiliaries, to protect the flanks and front of the infantry. On May 7th Grant's army advanced with a view to taking Spotsylvania Court House. Thus was precipitated the cavalry battle at Todd's Tavern, and in part at least Sheridan's earnest desire became fulfilled. The battle was between Hampton's and Fitzhugh Lee's commands of Stuart's cavalry and Gregg's division, assisted by two brigades of Torbert's division under the command of General Merritt. After a severe engagement the Confederate cavalry broke and were pursued almost to Spotsylvania Court House. This photograph shows some of the Federal horses recuperating at Belle Plain Landing before this cavalry engagement on a large
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official diary of First corps, A. N. V., while commanded by Lieutenant-General R. H. Anderson, from May 7th to 31st, 1864. (search)
Official diary of First corps, A. N. V., while commanded by Lieutenant-General R. H. Anderson, from May 7th to 31st, 1864. May 7th During the morning there is occasional skirmishing on our lines, which are rectified and connected. At eleven o'clock P. M. we take up the line of march for Spotsylvania Courthouse, in a shady grove, where we rest an hour at dawn on the 8th, Kershaw leading. We find Fitz. Lee hotly engaged on the Todd's Tavern and Spottsylvania Courthouse road. We arrive in time to relieve him but not to save the Courthouse, which is, however, afterwards occupied by us, the enemy being driven out. Kershaw's and Humphreys' brigades are turned off rapidly to the left of the road, and, occupying some cover left by our cavalry, repulse the enemy with great slaughter. Wofford's and Bryan's brigades are sent against the Courthouse by a detour, and finally occupy it. During the fight with the two first named brigades, Haskell's battalion is sharply engaged and does go
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