Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1767 AD or search for 1767 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 69 results in 65 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kentucky, (search)
Garrett Davis37th to 42d1861 to 1872 James Guthrie39th to 40th1865 to 1868 Thomas C. McCreery40th1868 to 1871 Willis B. Machen42d1872 to 1873 John W. Stevenson42d to 45th1871 to 1877 Thomas C. McCreery43d to 46th1873 to 1879 James B. Beck45th to 51st1877 to 1890 John S. Williams46th to 49th1879 to 1885 Joseph C. S. Blackburn49th to 55th1885 to 1897 John G. Carlisle51st to 52d1890 to 1893 William Lindsey53d to —1893 to — William J. Deboe55th to —1897 to — Early settlements. In 1767 John Finley, an Indian trader, explored the country beyond the mountains westward of North Carolina. In 1769 he returned to North Carolina and gave glowing accounts of the fertile country he had left. He persuaded Daniel Boone and four others to go with him to explore it. Boone had become a great hunter and expert in woodcraft. They reached the headwaters of the Kentucky, and, from lofty hills, beheld a vision of a magnificent valley, covered with forests, stretching towards the Ohio, an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Laurance, John 1750-1810 (search)
Laurance, John 1750-1810 Jurist; born in Cornwall, England, in 1750; came to New York in 1767, where he was admitted to the bar in 1772, and married the daughter of General McDougall, on whose staff he served. He was also in Washington s military family. He was judge-advocate at the court of inquiry in Major Andreas case; was a member of Congress in 1785-86; State Senator in 1789; and member of the Congress from 1789 to 1793. He was also judge of the United States district court of New York from 1794 to 1796, and of the United States Supreme Court from 1796 to 1800. He died in New York in November, 1810.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Liberty Poles. (search)
eal (March 18), and inaugurated it by erecting a liberty pole, which the soldiery cut down that night. The people again erected it, bound with hoops of iron, and placed a guard there, when soldiers came with loaded muskets, fired two random shots into the headquarters of the Sons of Liberty (Montagne's), and attempted to drive the people away. Fearful retaliation would have followed but for the repression of aggressive acts by the soldiers, by order of the governor. On the King's birthday, 1767, the soldiers made an unsuccessful attempt to prostrate the liberty pole; but at midnight, June 16, 1770, armed men came from the barracks, hewed it down, sawed it to pieces, and piled it in front of Montagne's. The perpetrators were discovered, the bells of St. George's Chapel, in Beekman Street, were rung, and early the next morning 3,000 people stood around the stump of the pole. There they passed strong resolutions of a determination to maintain their liberties at all hazards. For three
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Logan 1725- (search)
Logan 1725- (Indian name, Ta-Ga-jute), Cayuga chief; born in Shamokin, Pa., about 1725; received his English name from James Logan, secretary of the province of Pennsylvania; went beyond the Alleghanies before 1767; and in 1772, Heckewelder, the Moravian missionary, met him on the Beaver River, and observed his great mental capacity. His family were massacred by a party of white people in the spring of 1774, which was the occasion of his celebrated speech after the defeat of the Indians at Point Pleasant. He was invited to a conference with Lord Dunmore on the Scioto. He refused to have any friendly intercourse with a white man, but sent by the messenger (Col. John Gibson, who married his sister) the following remarkable speech to the council: I appeal to any white man to say if he ever entered Logan's cabin hungry and he gave him no meat; if he ever came cold and naked and he clothed him not. During the course of the last long and bloody war, Logan remained idle in his cabin,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McCall, Hugh 1767-1824 (search)
McCall, Hugh 1767-1824 Military officer; born in South Carolina in 1767; joined the army in May, 1794; was promoted captain in August, 1800. When the army was reorganized in 1802 he was retained in the 2d Infantry; was brevetted major in July, 1812; and served during the second war with England. He was the author of a History of Georgia. He died in Savannah, Ga., July 9, 1824. McCall, Hugh 1767-1824 Military officer; born in South Carolina in 1767; joined the army in May, 1794; was promoted captain in August, 1800. When the army was reorganized in 1802 he was retained in the 2d Infantry; was brevetted major in July, 1812; and served during the second war with England. He was the author of a History of Georgia. He died in Savannah, Ga., July 9, 1824.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maltby, Isaac 1767-1819 (search)
Maltby, Isaac 1767-1819 Author; born in Northfield, Conn., Nov. 10, 1767; graduated at Yale College in 1786; brigadier-general of Massachusetts militia in 1813-15. He was prominent in the politics of Massachusetts, serving several terms in its legislature. He was the author of Elements of War; Courts-martial and military law; and Military tactics. He died in Waterloo, N. Y., Sept. 9, 1819.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mason and Dixon's line, (search)
Mason and Dixon's line, The disputed boundary-line between the State of Pennsylvania and the States of Maryland and Virginia—the border-line between the free and the slave States—fixed by Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon, English mathematicians and surveyors employed for the purpose, between 1763 and 1767. In the debates on slavery before the admission of Missouri, John Randolph used the words Mason and Dixon's line as figurative of the division between the two systems of labor. The press and the politicians echoed it; and in that connection it was used until the destruction of slavery by the Civil
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Colony of New Hampshire, (search)
Heights, Saratoga, and Monmouth. The first seal of New Hampshire as an independent State is represented in the engraving. The tree and fish indicate the productions of the State. Shortly after the treaty of Aix-la-Chapelle (1748), settlements in New Hampshire began to extend westward of the Connecticut River. The territory of New Hampshire had been reckoned to extend, according to the terms of Mason's grant, only 60 miles in the interior ; the commission of Benning Wentworth, then (1741-67) governor of New Hampshire, included all the territory to the boundaries of his Majesty's other provinces, and in 1752 he began to issue grants of lands to settlers west of the Connecticut, in what is now the State of Vermont New York, by virtue of the duke's patent in 1664, claimed the Connecticut River as its eastern boundary. A mild dispute then arose. New York had relinquished its claim so far east as against Connecticut, and against Massachusetts it was not then seriously insisted upo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Smyrna colony. (search)
New Smyrna colony. In 1767 Dr. Trumbull, of Charleston, S. C., went to the place known as New Smyrna, in Florida, with about 1,500 persons— Greeks, Italians, and Minorcans—whom he had persuaded to follow him to better their fortunes. He established them on a tract of 60.000 acres, and began the cultivation of indigo. Trumbull reduced these poor people to slavery, and treated them most cruelly. The English governor of the territory was his partner in the enterprise. He kept the colonists in subjection by troops. This slavery lasted nine years, when, in 1776, the petitions of the people were heard and heeded by a new governor just arrived, and they were released from the tyranny of Trumbull. Nearly two-thirds of the colonists had then perished. Most of the survivors went to St. Augustine, where their descendants constituted a considerable portion of the native populat
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New York, colony of (search)
n (Albany), and during the French and Indian War many of its most stirring events occurred in the province of New York. That war ended by treaty in 1763, and not long afterwards began the struggle of the English-American colonies against the oppressions of Great Britain. New York took a leading part in that struggle, and in the war for independence that ensued. The Provincial Assembly of New York steadily refused compliance with the demands of the mutiny and quarantine acts, and early in 1767 Parliament passed an act prohibiting the governor, council, and Assembly of New York passing any legislative act for any purpose whatsoever. Partial concessions were made; but a new Assembly, convened in February. 1768, composed of less pliable New York Harbor in colonial days. materials, would not recede from its position of independence, though the province was made to feel the full weight of the royal displeasure. In May, 1769, the Assembly yielded, and made an appropriation for the
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