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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 23, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Oldport days, with ten heliotype illustrations from views taken in Newport, R. I., expressly for this work. 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, A book of American explorers 2 0 Browse Search
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Bliss Perry, The American spirit in lierature: a chronicle of great interpreters, Chapter 6: the Transcendentalists (search)
most brilliant and radical minds of New England. Its foremost representative in our literature was Ralph Waldo Emerson, as its chief exponents in England were Coleridge and Carlyle. We must understand its meaning if we would perceive the quality of much of the most noble and beautiful writing produced in New England during the l faculties can give us no realities. Let us next hear Emerson himself, first in an early letter to his brother Edward: Do you draw the distinction of Milton, Coleridge, and the Germans between Reason and Understanding? I think it a philosophy itself, and, like all truth, very practical. Reason is the highest faculty of the so died of consumption in the same year. He now sailed for Italy, France, and England, a memorable journey which gave him an acquaintance with Landor, Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Carlyle, but which was even more significant in sending him, as he says, back to himself, to the resources of his own nature. When shows break up, wrote Wh
ars, was fifteen when Byron died, in 1824. He was untouched by the nobler mood of Byron, though his verse was colored by the influence of Byron, Moore, and Shelley. His prose models were De Quincey, Disraeli, and Bulwer. Yet he owed more to Coleridge than to any of the Romantics. He was himself a sort of Coleridge without the piety, with the same keen penetrating critical intelligence, the same lovely opium-shadowed dreams, and, alas, with something of the same reputation as a dead-beat. Coleridge without the piety, with the same keen penetrating critical intelligence, the same lovely opium-shadowed dreams, and, alas, with something of the same reputation as a dead-beat. A child of strolling players, Poe happened to be born in Boston, but he hated Frogpondium his favorite name for the city of his nativity-as much as Whistler hated his native town of Lowell. His father died early of tuberculosis, and his mother, after a pitiful struggle with'disease and poverty, soon followed her husband to the grave. The boy, by physical inheritance a neurasthenic, though with marked bodily activity in youth, was adopted by the Allans, a kindly family in Richmond, Virginia.
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 11: George Thompson, M. P.—1851. (search)
Why is gradual emancipation right?— Because the slaves are black. 3. Why is immediate emancipation wrong, dangerous, impracticable?—Because the slaves are black, etc. and many editorial articles on Peace, the Bible, the Constitution, etc., from the Liberator's twenty-one volumes, together with the best of Mr. Garrison's verse. The letter to Peleg Sprague was not omitted, Ante, 1.505. and the Appendix contained a portion of Sprague's Faneuil Ante, 1.496. Hall speech, the account of the Boston mob of October 21, Ante, 2.11. 1835, written by its victim, Thompson's letter addressed to him on the day following, and sundry proofs of the Ante, 1.297. character of the Colonization Society. The title-page bore these lines from Coleridge's Fears in Solitude : O my brethren! I have told Most bitter truth, but without bitterness. Nor deem my zeal or factious or mistimed; For never can true courage dwell with them Who, playing tricks with Conscience, dare not look At their own vic
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen, Margaret Fuller Ossoli. (search)
rgaret Fuller's criticism; and her tone of arrogance is more than counterbalanced by the fierce personalities with which the poet retaliated upon her in the Fable for critics. The criticisms on English poets in this collection seem to me singularly admirable; they take rank with those of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, in her Essays on the poets. There are many single phrases that are unsurpassed in insight and expression, as where she speaks of the strange, bleak fidelity of Crabbe. Give Coleridge a canvas, she says, and he will paint a picture as if his colors were made of the mind's own atoms. The rush, the flow, the delicacy of vibration in Shelley's verse can only be paralleled by the waterfall, the rivulet, the notes of the bird and of the insect world. It is as yet impossible to estimate duly the effect which the balm of his [Wordsworth's] meditations has had in allaying the fever of the public heart, as exhibited in Byron and Shelley. This is a rare series of condensed cri
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 8: to England and the Continent.—1867. (search)
rs, and Mr. Webb's wit and jollity were inexhaustible, keeping the party in constant merriment. Their course followed the usual track from Geneva to Chamonix, where Mr. Aug. 31. Garrison's agility in descending the Flegere made him foot-sore Sept. 1. for days; but the glorious views of the Mont Blanc range, surpassing anything he had ever seen, were ample recompense. His spirits rose with the increasing grandeur of the scenery and he sang exuberantly. The familiar lines from Byron and Coleridge were frequently repeated by him and Mr. Webb, who discussed many a topic of mutual interest as they drove or walked or sat together during their journeyings and restings; and their friendship of twenty-seven years ripened to the closest mutual affection. I . . . spent three weeks with the Garrisons in Paris and Switzerland. It was a time of intense enjoyment, for I exceedingly liked my companions. . . . As to Mr. Garrison himself, he is the most delightful man I have ever known-magnanimo
an organ effect and support which somewhat smoothed the imperfections of the exercise, while calling up the associations of church and congregation. The reading habit of his boyhood could not be Ante, 1.42, 56. maintained by my father amid the unremitting cares and occupations of his life-work. The list of authors already mentioned as his early favorites cannot be greatly Ante, 1.42. extended; but in prose, Algernon Sydney and Jonathan Dymond; in poetry, Shakespeare, Milton, Cowper, Coleridge, Shelley, Montgomery (to say nothing of Whittier), should be added. About the year 1850, certain publishers began with some regularity to send books to the Liberator for review; and it is pathetic to observe the scrupulous acknowledgment of them, generally with a notice, however brief, when the readers of the paper might have grudged both the space used in this way, and the diversion from much more urgent editorial writing. The books in question were, as a rule, of a rather poor grade, o
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
d. Then America, too, discovered him, and he was soon known from London to San Francisco. Although his debt to Byron, Coleridge, and other romanticists is obvious to any reader, his verse is by no means purely imitative. If his subject matter hadodes prevailing in Great Britain. The first serious attempt to introduce German philosophy into this country came with Coleridge's Aids to reflection (1829), and the apologetic tone of President Marsh's introductory essay showed how powerfully the he a priori method. Empiricism was certainly not the dominant characteristic of Anglo-Saxon thought in the period when Coleridge, Hamilton, and Whewell were in the foreground. Slowly the scientific mode of thought spread, however, and found in Mils enormous reading. His Recent Exemplifications of false philology (1872), though it incidentally bowls over Landor. Coleridge, and De Quincy, fulminates chiefly against Richard Grant White, and his Modern English (1873) returns to the attack, on
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
6, 91, 154, 155, 267, 271, 570, 615 Cleopatra, 38 Cleveland, Grover, 48, 354 Cliff-dwellers, the, 92 Climate of Hawaii, the, 156 Clinton, DeWitt, 397, 398, 411, 415 Clouds, the, 460, 463 Coan, Titus, 155 Coan, Titus, Munson, 156 Cobb, Irvin S., 498 Cobb, Sylvanus, 66 Cody, William F., 66, 133 Cogswell, J. G., 451, 452, 456 Cohan, George M., 289-290, 498 Cohn, Gustav, 443 Coin's financial Fool, 358 Coin's financial school, 357 Colden, Cadwallader, 179 Coleridge, 54, 228, 234, 475 Colgate College, 205 Colleen Bawn, the, 268 College Fetich, A, 459 n. College of Mirania, 394 College widow, the, 289 Collier, J. P., 481, 482 Collier's weekly, 293, 333 Collins, J. A., 437 Colman, John, 426 Colonel Carter of Cartersville, 95, 283 Colonel Nimrod Wildfire, 275 Colonial girl, 280 Colonial records (N. C.), 176 Colonial records of Pennsylvania, the, 175 Colorado River exploring expedition, 158 Colton, Calvin, 435 Col
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays, A letter to a young contributor. (search)
and attractive, as if your life depended on it: your literary life does depend on it, and, if you fail, relapses into a dead language, and becomes, like that of Coleridge, only a Biographia Literaria. Labor, therefore, not in thought alone, but in utterance; clothe and reclothe your grand conception twenty times, if need be, untillaborious to do his utmost for his disciples, becomes after all incomprehensible, we can try to believe that it is only that inevitable obscurity of depth which Coleridge calls a compliment to the reader. In learning to write availably, a newspaper-office is a capital preparatory school. Nothing is so good to teach the use of r amplitude of vocabulary, wealth of accumulated materials is essential; and whether this wealth be won by reading or by experience makes no great difference. Coleridge attended Davy's chemical lectures to acquire new metaphors, and it is of no consequence whether one comes to literature from a library, a machine-shop, or a fore
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays, Ought women to learn the alphabet? (search)
e declares that the very being and existence of the woman is suspended during the marriage, and American Kent echoes that her legal existence and authority are in a manner lost ; when Petersdorff asserts that the husband has the right of imposing such corporeal restraints as he may deem necessary, and Bacon that the husband hath, by law, power and dominion over his wife, and may keep her by force within the bounds of duty, and may beat her, but not in a violent or cruel manner ; when Mr. Justice Coleridge rules that the husband, in certain cases, has a right to confine his wife in his own dwelling-house, and restrain her from liberty for an indefinite time, and Baron Alderson sums it all up tersely, The wife is only the servant of her husband, --these high authorities simply reaffirm the dogma of the Gentoo code, four thousand years old and more. A man, both day and night, must keep his wife so much in subjection that she by no means be mistress of her own actions. If the wife have
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