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r himself. Among the papers taken was an autograph letter of General Robert Lee to General Stuart, dated Gordonsville, August fifteenth, whicd through Thoroughfare Gap, and to interpose between the army of General Lee and Bull Run. During the night of the twenty-sixth the main bodntreville, which would carry him still further from the main body of Lee's army or to mass his force, assault us at Bristow station and turn en joined by any of the forces of Longstreet, and that the army of Gen. Lee would have been so crippled and checked by the destruction of thisnd the morning of the thirtieth, the advance of the main army, under Lee, was arriving on the field to reenforce Jackson, so that by twelve on the lower fords of the Rappahannock. A captured letter from Gen. Robert Lee to Gen. Stuart, dated at Gordonsville, August fifteenth, clearI think it altogether well to bring Franklin's force to Alexandria. Lee made his headquarters at Culpeper last night. He has the whole of h
r himself. Among the papers taken was an autograph letter of General Robert Lee to General Stuart, dated Gordonsville, August fifteenth, whicd through Thoroughfare Gap, and to interpose between the army of General Lee and Bull Run. During the night of the twenty-sixth the main bodntreville, which would carry him still further from the main body of Lee's army or to mass his force, assault us at Bristow station and turn en joined by any of the forces of Longstreet, and that the army of Gen. Lee would have been so crippled and checked by the destruction of thisnd the morning of the thirtieth, the advance of the main army, under Lee, was arriving on the field to reenforce Jackson, so that by twelve on the lower fords of the Rappahannock. A captured letter from Gen. Robert Lee to Gen. Stuart, dated at Gordonsville, August fifteenth, clearI think it altogether well to bring Franklin's force to Alexandria. Lee made his headquarters at Culpeper last night. He has the whole of h
589. Lansing, Col., 370. Le Compte, Maj. F., 123. Lee, Gen., Fitz-Hugh, 514. 526. Lee, Col., Raymond, at Ball's Bluff, 171, 189, 190; Fair Oaks, 381. Lee, Gen., Robert, in Peninsula, 240, 482; Pope's campaign, 518, 531 ; in Maryland, 556, 557, 573, 624, 643, 660 ; lost order, 573. Leesburg,Va., 170, 171, 181-190, 550. ents, 549, 550, 553, 554, reasons for 557 ; assumes command, campaign necessary, 551 ; army disorganized. 551, 622 ; tribute to army, 552 ; purpose of campaign, Gen. Lee, 553, 642 ; force, 568, of enemy 569 ; Halleck anxious, misquotes despatch, 555, 556 ; Harper's Ferry affair, Crampton's Gap, 558-565 ; reception at Frederick, 571, 572 ; enemy's movements, 570, 572, 573 ; Lee's lost despatch. 573--South Mountain, 572-583 ; orders, an historical error, tribute to 2d corps, 575 ; tribute to Reno, 578 ; Burnside's action, 583.-Antietam, 584-613; orders, 584; Burnside's conduct. 586, 603, 604, 607-611, 616 ; positions, 587, 588 ; Burnside bridge, 588, 602,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address on the character of General R. E. Lee, delivered in Richmond on Wednesday, January 19th, 1876, the anniversary of General Lee's birth (search)
just, our country to be honored, when those principles had for disciple, that cause for defender, that country for son, Robert Lee? The day has by no means come to fix with absolute precision the rank of Lee among the world's great soldiers. But Lee among the world's great soldiers. But the day will come, and it is ours to gather and preserve and certify the facts to be the record before the dread tribunal of time. Turning, then, to the soldiership of Lee; from first to last, we see his labor and exactness, giving always the powLee; from first to last, we see his labor and exactness, giving always the power to gain from every means its utmost result. Thus, he so pursued the sciences which underlie the soldier's art, that he entered the army fully equipped with all that theory could teach, and whilst yet a subaltern was more than once entrusted with same sense as that other army, of Cortez, whose footsteps it followed, and whose prowess it rivaled. In that campaign Lee's soldiership first found fit field. It was he whose skill gave us the quick foothold of Vera Cruz. At Cerro Gordo an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 7.48 (search)
Bohun, than, at the battle of the Wilderness, was Robert Lee, in whose veins coursed the mingled blood of thes from 1710 to 1723, I discovered that through him Robert Lee, of Virginia, was seventeenth in direct descent fn driving back the invaders of their beloved country, Lee, through the same channel, was the direct descendant e never been brought out in any of the biographies of Lee. Indeed, until now, they were unknown to any of the d of some remote ancestor, this Brucean descent of General Lee will be of interest. I shall, therefore, present a genealogical chain connecting General Lee to Duncan, King of Scotland, not a link of which is doubtful, for sh devotion to native land, so fully developed in General Lee, are seen, more or less distinctly marked, in allantly harrassed by Patrick Dunbar, an ancestor of General Lee, and kept constantly engaged in light skirmishes,d seem to have been written only ten years ago of Robert Lee, the greatest soldier and the highest type of the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Some reminiscences of the Second of April, 1865. (search)
. Immediately on reaching my lodgings I met a friend, who asked me if I had heard the news. I responded No; what is it? He replied: Dr. Morris's little daughter was just over here, and said that her father had just come home and stated that General Lee had telegraphed President Davis that the enemy had broken the Confederate lines, that the army would have to retire further South, and Richmond would have to be evacuated. Our beloved General John C. Breckinridge was then Secretary of War. I war they waged against us was, as we think, a flagrant violation of the most cherished and fundamental principles of American institutions. Receiving at Danville the melancholy intelligence of the overthrow of that grand and noble soldier, General Lee, at Appomattox, all intelligent persons perceived that our cause was finally subverted, and that the conquest for which the war had been waged was virtually accomplished. I then felt more sensibly than ever before the force of the conviction
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), History of Lane's North Carolina brigade (search)
enemy's skirmish line. Late in the winter, about the opening of spring, I received a note from General Wilcox, asking, can't you catch a Yankee to-night for General Lee? Some of the enemy are moving, and he wants to know what command it is. I at once sent for Major Wooten. When he had read the note, I asked if he thought it g. The enemy fired, but no one was hurt. About day Wooten reported to me that he had not been able to catch a Yankee, but that he had seven Dutchmen. Whether General Lee was able to get any information from them, I never heard. I only know that no one at our headquarters could understand their foreign gibberish. After Gordoner quarters. This hill was on the left of the road leading to the Jones House, and not far from it. We retake the Hill in front of our left. Next morning General Lee sent for me, and wished to know if I could dislodge the enemy from the hill mentioned above. When I told him I thought I could, but that I would like to have r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fight with gunboats at Mathias point. (search)
nd the river. A brief skirmish ensued, in which several of the enemy fell and were supposed to have been killed and wounded. During the conflict the fire of our men was turned upon the steamer Freeborn, as well as upon the boats, which were pushed off with precipitation and alarm. Then with a battery of field guns the enemy would have been crushed as well as defeated. The attack was made by Major R. M. Mayo, with Gouldin's company of Sparta Grays, under First Lieutenant Saunders, and Lee's Legion of Cavalry, under First Lieutenant R. L. T. Beale, belonging to his battallion, and terminated before the troops concentrating became generally engaged. The Sparta Grays were armed with Sharpe's rifles, and all the other troops with old pattern flint-lock muskets and old sabres. There was every indication that the enemy suffered a severe loss, while on our part we met with none. We captured------spades and------axes, and some two hundred and fifty sand bags, and a large coi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The infantry of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
tongue can fitly speak their praise? An angel's heart, an angel's mouth, Not Homer's, could alone for me Hymn well the great Confederate South, Virginia first, and Lee. My comrades, I would not if I could, draw any invidious comparisons between the dashing troopers who charged on a hundred hard-fought fields with Ashby, and Han, poets, painters and philosophers, statesmen, orators and heroes, and tell me where you can find exemplars more worthy of imitation than Stonewall Jackson and Robert Lee? But it is not of the great leaders of that splendid infantry of whom General Lee once said that, the stragglers of the Army of Northern Virginia are better General Lee once said that, the stragglers of the Army of Northern Virginia are better than the best troops of the enemy, that I desire alone, or chiefly to speak. They have written their names with their swords high on the Roll of Fame, and though no lofty monuments be reared to bear their virtues to the ages yet to come, they will be remembered as long as the recital of great deeds grandly done, awakens a responsi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 8.83 (search)
A high private's account of the battle of Sharpsburg. [from four years in the ranks, (now in press,) by Alexandeb Hunter.] Paper no. 1. General Lee was often asked after the war which battle he was proudest of, and where he fought the greatest odds? He always answered at Sharpsburg. His army depleted by battles, hardshiorious ease through the rich country. All these causes combined, dwindled the Army of Northern Virginia away to a mere frazzle, as General Gordon expressed it, and Lee fought the battle at Sharpsburg with skeleton regiments, brigades and divisions. I copy from my note book. * * * * * * On the march. On the 20th day of Auglay many wounded and dead, among others General Phil. Kearny, the most brilliant, chivalrous, dashing officer in the Yankee army. His body was sent by order of General Lee to the Yankee lines under a flag of truce. He was killed in a charge, and rode in the advance with his hat in the air and the bridle held in his teeth, for he
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