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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.33 (search)
s near Staunton with a similar force facing Milroy. In April General Banks, commanding the National forces in the Shenandoah Valley, had ascended it as far as Harrisonburg, and Jackson observed him from Swift Run Gap in the Blue Ridge, on the road from Harrisonburg to Gordonsville. Milroy also pushed eastward from Cheat MountainHarrisonburg to Gordonsville. Milroy also pushed eastward from Cheat Mountain summit, in which high regions winter still lingered, and had made his way through snows and rains to McDowell, ten miles east of Monterey, at the crossing of Bull Pasture River, where he threatened Staunton. But Banks was thought to be in too exposed a position, and was directed by the War Department to fall back to Strasburg, ach there till the 12th, when, finding that Fremont had concentrated his forces, he did not attack, but returned to McDowell, whence he took the direct road to Harrisonburg, and marched to attack Banks at Strasburg, Ewell meeting and joining him in this movement. Fremont resumed preparations for his original campaign, but Banks
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah. (search)
had pushed forward a force of 20,000 men to Harrisonburg, including Shields's division, 10,000 stron back to the Valley on the Warm Springs and Harrisonburg road. See note by General Schenck, p. 29 General Johnston, Jackson was en route for Harrisonburg, where he came upon the great Valley turnpiemont could reach the valley at or south of Harrisonburg. I knew that within four miles of Franklin, on the main road leading to Harrisonburg, there was a narrow defile hemmed in on both sides by neay toward Brock's Gap, on the direct road to Harrisonburg. The men I had sent to the cliffs let the h by President Lincoln to proceed direct to Harrisonburg. It shows how close had been Jackson's caleing at that time too full for fording. At Harrisonburg he took the road leading to Port Republic, he first Maryland (Confederate) regiment at Harrisonburg, June 6, 1862, and the death of Ashby. Ise of the battle, had hurried out from near Harrisonburg to help Tyler; but Jackson had burnt the br[4 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.38 (search)
. Bayard: 1st N. J. Cav., Col. Percy Wyndham (c), Lieut.-Col. Joseph Karge; 1st Pa. Cav., Col. Owen Jones; 13th Pa. Reserves or 1st Rifles (battalion), Lieut.-Col. Thomas L. Kane (w and c), Capt. Hugh McDonald; 2d Me. Battery, Capt. James A. Hall. Brigade loss: k, 1; w, 7= 8. The total loss of Fremont's forces at Cross Keys (as above given in detail) was 114 killed, 443 wounded, and 127 captured or missing =684. In the affairs at Mount Carmel, Strasburg, Woodstock, Mount Jackson, and Harrisonburg, etc., June 1st-7th, the loss aggregated 11 killed, 52 wounded, and 39 captured or missing = 102. General Fremont reports ( Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. I., p. 19) that 10,500 men is a liberal estimate of force in hand and for duty with his command, June 8th. Shields's division, June 8th-9th, 1862. Brigadier-General James Shields. Staff loss: w, 1. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Nathan Kimball: 14th Ind., Col. William Harrow; 4th Ohio, Col. John S. Mason; 8th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. F
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Union Army. (search)
. Bayard: 1st N. J. Cav., Col. Percy Wyndham (c), Lieut.-Col. Joseph Karge; 1st Pa. Cav., Col. Owen Jones; 13th Pa. Reserves or 1st Rifles (battalion), Lieut.-Col. Thomas L. Kane (w and c), Capt. Hugh McDonald; 2d Me. Battery, Capt. James A. Hall. Brigade loss: k, 1; w, 7= 8. The total loss of Fremont's forces at Cross Keys (as above given in detail) was 114 killed, 443 wounded, and 127 captured or missing =684. In the affairs at Mount Carmel, Strasburg, Woodstock, Mount Jackson, and Harrisonburg, etc., June 1st-7th, the loss aggregated 11 killed, 52 wounded, and 39 captured or missing = 102. General Fremont reports ( Official Records, Vol. XII., Pt. I., p. 19) that 10,500 men is a liberal estimate of force in hand and for duty with his command, June 8th. Shields's division, June 8th-9th, 1862. Brigadier-General James Shields. Staff loss: w, 1. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Nathan Kimball: 14th Ind., Col. William Harrow; 4th Ohio, Col. John S. Mason; 8th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. F
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Fighting Jackson at Kernstown. (search)
. By 11 A. M. the crossing was completed, and the enemy, forced from his position, retreated beyond New Market toward Harrisonburg and Port Republic, and our forces encamped in positions in advance of New Market. In this engagement our forces capt night the thanks of the President. On the 19th and 20th our forces, under General Williams, advanced and occupied Harrisonburg, while Shields's division held the roads to Luray, the crossings of the Shenandoah, and New Market. General Banks, in rcements, and was active in demonstrations. On the 1st of May, Jackson's army made movements threatening our right at Harrisonburg, and our left near the crossing of the Shenandoah toward Luray. Under cover of these a part of the force under Edwarde of the impassable river. On the 7th, Fremont forced the enemy from Mount Jackson, and pursued him to New Market and Harrisonburg, but failed to bring him to battle. On the 8th, Carroll reached the bridge at Port Republic with Tyler yet fifteen
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.68 (search)
s, be ordered on detached service, an intelligent performance of my duty might require a knowledge of the ulterior purposes and objects of the campaign. Here, said he, tracing with his finger on a large map, is the line of our communications, from Rapidan Station to Manassas, thence to Frederick. It is too near the Potomac, and is liable to be cut any day by the enemy's cavalry. I have therefore given orders to move the line back into the Valley of Virginia, by way of Staunton, Harrisonburg, and Winchester, entering Maryland at Shepherdstown. [See map, p. 553.] I wish you to return to the mouth of the Monocacy and effectually destroy the aqueduct of the Chesapeake and Ohio canal. By the time that is accomplished you will receive orders to cooperate in the capture of Harper's Ferry, and you will not return here, but, after the capture of Harper's Ferry, will rejoin us at Hagerstown, where the army will be concentrated. My information is that there are between 10,000 and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of New Market, Va., May 15th, 1864. (search)
ed promptly that he would join me via Lynchburg and Staunton by the 4th with about three thousand men. Late in the afternoon of June 2d I was driven through Harrisonburg with some loss. That night I took position on the south bank of the North River fork of the Shenandoah River at Mount Crawford, eight miles from Harrisonburg Harrisonburg and seventeen from Staunton. On the 3d Hunter rested at Harrisonburg. That night Jones's troops began to arrive in small detachments, just as they had been posted at many points along the line of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad west of Lynchburg. My staff and I were up nearly all night organizing these detachments into two Harrisonburg. That night Jones's troops began to arrive in small detachments, just as they had been posted at many points along the line of the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad west of Lynchburg. My staff and I were up nearly all night organizing these detachments into two small brigades. At sunrise of the 4th General Jones and staff rode up, having traveled from Staunton during the night. An hour or two later Brigadier-General J. C. Vaughn came up with less than one thousand of his Tennessee brigade of cavalry. The reserves of Augusta and Rockingham counties had assembled to the number of five
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sheridan in the Shenandoah Valley. (search)
an in this pursuit regretted the absence of his cavalry, which, with Torbert, was striving, by a circuitous and obstructed march, to reach the enemy's rear. A few miles beyond New Market Early abandoned the main road, which leads on through Harrisonburg; turning to the east, he pursued the road that leads thence to Port Republic. This direction was taken to receive the reenforcements which were to reach him through one of the gaps of the Blue Ridge. For it appears that Kershaw and his commavalry succeeded in delaying Torbert until infantry was hurried by rail from Richmond, when he was forced to retire. As a diversion in favor of Torbert's expedition Custer's cavalry was moved up the Valley to engage the cavalry of Early. Near Harrisonburg he was attacked and surprised and was forced to retreat. In making these expeditions the troops suffered intensely from cold, bad roads, and miserable camps. This was especially so with Torbert's column in crossing the mountains. It is di
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 10.78 (search)
ss the country to Mount Sidney on the valley pike. Grant says that, after the fight at Fisher's Hill, Sheridan pursued him [Early] with great energy through Harrisonburg, Staunton, and the gaps of the Blue Ridge. I did not leave the valley at all. Had Sheridan moved his infantry to Port Republic, I would have been compelled tol John B. Gordon, C. S. A. From a photograph. about made up my losses at Winchester and Fisher's Hill, and I determined to attack the enemy in his position at Harrisonburg, and for that purpose made a reconnoissance on the 5th, but on the morning of the 6th it was discovered that he had retired during the night down the valley. While Sheridan's forces were near Harrisonburg, and mine were watching them, three of our cavalry scouts, ill their uniforms and with arms, got around his lines near a little town called Dayton, and encountered Lieutenant [John R.] Meigs, a Federal engineer officer, with two soldiers. These parties came upon each other suddenly
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
endleton County, over the mountains west of Harrisonburg, with fifteen thousand men; General Banks wusand men, while General Banks was lying at Harrisonburg, not far away, his force reduced to about fth his army over the Shenandoah Mountain to Harrisonburg for the same purpose, and with the hope thato the Valley than the one from Franklin to Harrisonburg, and reached Strasburg on the evening of thsoners at least a day in his rear, reaching Harrisonburg on the 5th of June. Jackson now perceiveGeneral Turner Ashby. About two miles from Harrisonburg this rear-guard was attacked by a reconnoitk, and Fisher's Hill, we left Strasburg for Harrisonburg at nine o'clock in the evening, Oct. 5, 18of fifty miles, and we were at breakfast in Harrisonburg the next morning at eight o'clock. An hour d were not disappointed. A mile south of Harrisonburg we turned to the left up a rough, lane-likerode on to Port Republic, twelve miles from Harrisonburg, where we passed over a substantial new bri[6 more...]
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