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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 2 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
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t Suffolk, Va., 1862, 1863. Blackwater, Va., Nov. 17, 1862; long detailed account. Boston Evening Journal, Nov. 24, 1862, p. 4, col. 3. — – – Beaver Dam Church, Va., Dec. 1, 1862. Boston Evening Journal, Dec. 6, 1862, p. 2, col. 4. — – – Zuni, Va., Dec. 12, 1862. Boston Evening Journal, Dec. 16, 1862, p. 4, col. 5. — – – General condition; letters. Boston Evening Journal, Jan. 15, 1863, p. 2, cols. 3, 4, p. 4, col. 4; Jan. 28, p. 4, col. 6; Feb. 2, p. 4, col. 5. — – – Engagement as. Century, vol. 29, p. 767. — Subterranean shells at; note. Gen. Fred T. Locke. Century, vol. 30, p. 641. Young, Corp. P., Co. D, 15th Regt. M. V. I. Ball's Bluff, Oct. 21, 1861. Crossing the river. Boston Evening Journal, Nov. 9, 1861, p. 2, col. 3. Young folks' history of the war for the Union. John D. Champlin, Jr., rev. of. Century, vol. 23, p. 473. Zuni, Va. Engagement of Dec. 12, 1862. Co. I, 6th Regt. M. V. M. Boston Evening Journal, Dec
command had been transferred, confirmed this opinion in many minds. Halleck's strategy was to prevent this. Gen. John Pope, who had been in command of the enemy's forces in Missouri between the Missouri and Osage rivers, had sent Merrill's Horse through Saline county, where they were bombarded with mortars loaded with mud by Jo Shelby and his men, near Waverly. They stripped farms, impressed stock from women, and captured, February 19th, several companies of Confederate recruits at Blackwater creek, near Knobnoster, under Colonels Robinson, Alexander and McGiffin, of which achievement Generals Pope and Halleck made much boast to Washington. Brig.-Gen. S. R. Curtis was, December 23d, assigned to the command of the Federal forces of the southwestern district of Missouri. On December 2d, martial law had been declared in Missouri by Mr. Lincoln, and Curtis was without restraint. The men under him burned the towns of Dayton and Columbus on January 3, 1862, and with a largely superio
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
3; 149, D2 Yellow Creek, Mo. 152, A2; 161, B14 Yellow Creek, Tenn. 30, 2; 150, G3 Yellow House, Va. 41, 1; 94, 2 Yellow Medicine River, Minn. 33, 2 Yellow River, Fla. 147, E7 Yellow Tavern, Va. 21, 9; 74, 1; 77, 1; 81, 3; 100, 1 Yellville, Ark. 47, 1; 135-A; 153, E2; 171 York River, Va. 16, 1; 17, 1; 92, 1; 117, 1; 135-A; 137, F10 Yorktown, Va. 14, 1; 15, 1-15, 4; 16, 1; 17, 1; 18, 1, 18, 2; 19, 2; 100, 1; 117, 1; 135-A; 137, F10; 171 Siege of, April 5-May 4, 1862 14, 1; 15, 1-15, 4; 17, 2, 17, 3; 19, 2 Williamsburg to 18, 2 Yorkville, Tenn. 135-A; 153, F12 Young's Branch, Va. Battle of, July 21, 1861. See Bull Run, Va. Young's Cross-Roads, N. C. 138, B5 Young's Mill, Va. 18, 1 Young's Point, La. 35, 4; 36, 1; 37, 4; 155, C7 Yreka, Cal. 120, 1; 134, 1; 171 Fort Zarah, Kans. 119, 1 Zoar Church, Va. 39, 2, 39, 3; 45, 1; 47, 6; 81, 1 Zuni, Va. 93, 1; 135-A; 137, H9
ing at times within a few hundred yards. At the Jerusalem road they diverged to the left, and the distance between the entrenchments widened to more than two miles. On the 1st of September, the national left rested on the Weldon railroad, Warren's skirmishers reaching to the Vaughan and Squirrel level roads; but before long the main works extended to these roads; then running south about a mile and a half, they turned to the east and completely encircled the national camps, striking the Blackwater river, in the rear of Meade's right wing. There were also strong entrenched works at City Point, to protect the base of the army, and batteries were established at intervals on the James, from Chapin's Bluff to Fort Monroe. Each army was thus completely surrounded by its own entrenchments, and one fortified camp was in reality besieged by another. The national lines, like those of the rebels, consisted of infantry parapet connecting a series of more important works, by which the intermed
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel John Bowie Magruder. (search)
en he was promoted to brigadier-general. On the 20th of February, 1862, Brigadier-General A. G. Blanchard, commanding at Portsmouth, Va., moved Colonel Armistead's 57th Virginia regiment, and one section of Girardy's battery to defend the Blackwater river and cause its blockade. This force garrisoned Fort Dillard at the confluence of the Blackwater and Nottoway rivers, in North Carolina, until May 12th, when it was evacuated. Captain Magruder was directed to embark his company on an old steBlackwater and Nottoway rivers, in North Carolina, until May 12th, when it was evacuated. Captain Magruder was directed to embark his company on an old steamboat and proceed up the river to Franklin. It had in tow a large schooner, which Captain Magruder was ordered to sink in the channel about seven miles below Franklin, to prevent pursuit by the enemy's gunboats, which might attempt to come up the river from Edenton. This work, after considerable trouble with the leaking steamboat, was successfully accomplished, and Captain Magruder's command disembarked at Franklin about 1 o'clock P. M., and rejoined the rest of the regiment, which, by a forc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.56 (search)
ttle, R. S. Lewis, St. George T. Mason, A. M. Maclin, J. McGlemore, C. McCourt, A. Norris, John R. Norris,——Neblett, S, Potts, P. W. H. Parsons, W. H. Pennington, Roger A. Pryor, A. B. Parker, E. B. Robinson, J. W. Saunders, J. D. Spain, C. W. Spratley, W. W. Spratley, J. C. Smith, George Seaborn, W. E. Thornton, P. Vellines, Joseph H. Walters, J. L. Williamson. Killed. James McGlemore, Chickahominy river, June, 1862. Sidney Potts, died in hospital, 1862. William G. Freeman, Blackwater river, October, 1862. W. H. H. Parker, Middleburg, June, 1863. C. W. Spratley, Brandy Station, October, 1863. J. R. Morris, Upperville, June, 1863. Richard Parker, Upperville, June, 1863. J. Lewis Williamson, wounded Spotsylvania Courthouse, and died May, 1864. George Blow Walker, Ashland, June, 1864. J. L. Jordan, died in hospital, 1864. Richard Grigg, died at home, 1864. Thomas W. Adkins, Dinwiddie Courthouse, March, 1865. I. Bendall, Dinwiddie Courthouse, Marc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The campaign and battle of Lynchburg. (search)
and his wounded in a field hospital; facts which show how precipitously he departed. The Federal line of battle was formed on the left, directly through the yard of the residence of the late C. H. Moorman, whose farm lay on both sides of Blackwater creek, and occupied most of what is now called West Lynchburg. When it was known that Hunter was approaching, Mr. Moorman packed several wagons with provisions, and, with his negroes and stock, moved down toward the Staunton river, leaving his hoke, and found the lines around her house were being withdrawn, but it was some time before she discovered that the Federal troops were retreating. It was then nearly daylight, and she slipped out of the house and ran down to the ford across Blackwater creek and notified the cavalry at that point what she had seen. A company was at once sent off in pursuit to verify her statement. After they had gone, and as she returned home, she met a solitary Federal soldier on foot, who asked her what had
ing at times within a few hundred yards. At the Jerusalem road they diverged to the left, and the distance between the entrenchments widened to more than two miles. On the 1st of September, the national left rested on the Weldon railroad, Warren's skirmishers reaching to the Vaughan and Squirrel level roads; but before long the main works extended to these roads; then running south about a mile and a half, they turned to the east and completely encircled the national camps, striking the Blackwater river, in the rear of Meade's right wing. There were also strong entrenched works at City Point, to protect the base of the army, and batteries were established at intervals on the James, from Chapin's Bluff to Fort Monroe. Each army was thus completely surrounded by its own entrenchments, and one fortified camp was in reality besieged by another. The national lines, like those of the rebels, consisted of infantry parapet connecting a series of more important works, by which the intermed
Pecos. But he found there nothing of note, except an Indian who told of Quivira, a country to the north-east, the real land of the buffalo, abounding in gold and silver, and watered by tributaries of a river which was two leagues wide. The Spanish camp for the winter was established near Tiguex; there Alvarado brought the Indian who professed to know the way to Quivira; there Coronado himself appeared, after a tour among eight more southern villages; and there his army, which had reached Zuni without loss, arrived in December, suffering on its march from storms of snow and cold. The people who had thus far been discovered, had a civilization intermediate between that of the Mexicans and the tribes of hunters. They dwelt in fixed places of abode, built for security against roving hordes of savages, on tables of land that spread out upon steep natural castles of sandstone. Each house was large enough to contain three or four hundred persons, and consisted of one compact paralle
The Daily Dispatch: November 14, 1861., [Electronic resource], The Stephens regiment or 35th Georgia. (search)
Feed well — fight well. We occasionally see large droves of cattle passing through our streets. They are destined, we learn, for Petersburg, whence they are shipped to Zuni and Norfolk. We apprehend considerable difficulty at or near New port News should the half-starved Yankees encounter men so well provided for by their excellent Commissariat.
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