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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Higginson, Thomas Wentworth 1823- (search)
Higginson, Thomas Wentworth 1823- Author; born in Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 22, 1823; graduated at Harvard College in 1841; became pastor of the First Congregational Church in Newburyport, Mass., in 1847. In 1858 he gave up the ministry for literature. He entered the National army in September, 1862, and was made colonel of the 33d Colored Regiment in Thomas Wentworth Higginson. the same year. This regiment comprised the first freed slaves received into the National army. He was wounded at Willtown Bluffs, S. C., in August, 1863, and resigned in the following year. His publications include Army life in a Black Regiment; Young folks' history of the United States; History of education in Rhode Island; Young folks' book of American explorers; Short studies of American authors; Life of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (in American men of letters series, 1884) ; Larger history of the United States, etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hovey, Horace Carter 1833- (search)
Hovey, Horace Carter 1833- Clergyman; born in Rob Roy, Ind., in 1833; graduated at Wabash College in 1853, and at the Lane Theological Seminary in 1857; held pastorates in New Albany, Peoria, Minneapolis, New Haven, Bridgeport, and Newburyport. He is author of Origin and annals of old South of Newburyport; and a contributor to the Encyclopaedia Britannica. Hovey, Horace Carter 1833- Clergyman; born in Rob Roy, Ind., in 1833; graduated at Wabash College in 1853, and at the Lane Theological Seminary in 1857; held pastorates in New Albany, Peoria, Minneapolis, New Haven, Bridgeport, and Newburyport. He is author of Origin and annals of old South of Newburyport; and a contributor to the Encyclopaedia Britannica.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kettel, Samuel 1800-1855 (search)
Kettel, Samuel 1800-1855 Editor; born in Newburyport, Mass., Aug. 5, 1800; became editor of the Boston Courier in 1848. His publications include Specimens of American poetry, with critical and biographical notices; Personal narrative of the first voyage of Columbus, etc. He died in Malden, Mass., Dec. 3, 1855.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), King, Rufus 1755-1827 (search)
King, Rufus 1755-1827 Statesman; born in Scarboro, Me., March 14, 1755; graduated at Harvard in 1777; studied law with Theophilus Parsons, in Newburyport, and in 1778 became aide-de-camp on General Glover's staff, in the expedition against the British on Rhode Island. In 1785 he was an earnest advocate of the absolute freedom of the slaves, to be secured by the operation of an act of Congress, making such freedom a fundamental principle of the Constitution. Mr. King and General Schuyler were chosen the first representatives of New York in the national Senate of 1789, under the new Constitution. Mr. King was a leading Federalist. From 1798 to 1804 he was American minister to Great Britain; and in 1818 he was sent to the United States Senate for the third time. He was an able leader of the opposition to the admission of Missouri under the terms of the compromise as a slave-labor State. In 1825 he accepted the appointment of minister to England, but returned in feeble health t
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Knapp, Samuel Lorenzo 1783-1838 (search)
Knapp, Samuel Lorenzo 1783-1838 Author; born in Newburyport, Mass., Jan. 19, 1783; graduated at Dartmouth College in 1804; became a lawyer; and was a commander on the coast defences in the War of 1812. His publications include Travels in North-America by Ali Bey; Memoirs of General Lafayette; American biography; History of the United States (a revision of John Hinton's edition); Memoir of the life of Daniel Webster; Life of Aaron Burr; Life of Andrew Jackson, etc. He also edited The Library of American history. He died in Hopkinton, Mass., July 8, 1838.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lowell, John 1769-1840 (search)
Lowell, John 1769-1840 Author; born in Newburyport, Mass., Oct. 6, 1769; graduated at Harvard College in 1786; became a prolific writer, and published about twenty-five pamphlets. He was a strong political partisan, but would never take office, and he wrote severely against the supporters of the War of 1812-15. With his extraordinary colloquial powers and elegant and logical pen, he wielded great influence in Massachusetts. Mr. Lowell was a founder of the Massachusetts General Hospital, the Boston Athenaeum, the Savings Bank, and the Hospital Life Insurance Company. For many years he was president of the Massachusetts Agricultural Society. He died in Boston, March 12, 1840. Lawyer; born in Newburyport, Mass., June 17, 1743; graduated at Harvard College in 1760; admitted to the bar in 1762, and settled in Boston in 1777. He held a seat in the convention which drew up the constitution of Massachusetts in 1780, and was a member of the committee which drafted that document
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Lunt, George 1803-1885 (search)
Lunt, George 1803-1885 Author; born in Newburyport, Mass., Dec. 31, 1803; graduated at Harvard College in 1824; became a lawyer in his native town in 1827. He took an active interest in State and national politics; and was United States district attorney during the administration of President Taylor. He wrote Three eras of New England; The Union, a poem; Origin of the late War; Old New England traits, etc. He died in Boston, May 17, 1885.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Parsons, Theophilus 1750-1813 (search)
0-1813 Jurist; born in Byfield, Mass., Feb. 24, 1750; graduated at Harvard College in 1769; admitted to the bar in 1774; and was at the head of a grammar-school in Falmouth (now Portland), Me., when it was destroyed. He began practice in Newburyport in 1777, and in 1780 was one of the principal framers of the State constitution of Massachusetts. He removed to Boston in 1800, where, until his death, he was regarded as the brightest of the legal lights of New England. He had been a zealouembraced in six volumes. His memory was wonderful, and he was eloquent as a speaker. His Opinions were published in New York in 1836, under the title of Commentaries on American law. He died in Boston, Oct. 30. 1813. Lawyer; born in Newburyport, Mass., May 17, 1797; graduated at Harvard College in 1815; studied law; was Professor of Law in Harvard in 1847-82. His publications include Elements of mercantile law; Laws of business for business men; Maritime law; Notes on bills of exchange;
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Parton, James 1822-1891 (search)
Parton, James 1822-1891 Author; born in Canterbury, England, Feb. 9, 1822; was brought to the United States when a child; received a common school education in New York City; removed to Newburyport, Mass., in 1875. His publications include Life of Horace Greeley; Life and times Of Aaron Burr; Life of Andrew Jackson; Life and times of Benjamin Franklin; Manual for the instruction of rings, Railroad and political, and how New York is governed; Famous Americans of recent times; The words of received a common school education in New York City; removed to Newburyport, Mass., in 1875. His publications include Life of Horace Greeley; Life and times Of Aaron Burr; Life of Andrew Jackson; Life and times of Benjamin Franklin; Manual for the instruction of rings, Railroad and political, and how New York is governed; Famous Americans of recent times; The words of Washington; Life of Thomas Jefferson, third President of the United States, etc. He died in Newburyport, Mass., Oct. 17, 1891.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Perkins, Jacob 1766-1849 (search)
Perkins, Jacob 1766-1849 Inventor; born in Newburyport, Mass., July 9, 1766. As early as his fifteenth year he carried on the business of a goldsmith in Newburyport, and early invented a method for plating shoe-buckles. He made dies for coining money when the United States Mint was under consideration. He was then twenty-one, and when he was twenty-four he invented a machine for making nails at one operation, and steel plates for bank-notes, which, it was supposed, could not be counterfeNewburyport, and early invented a method for plating shoe-buckles. He made dies for coining money when the United States Mint was under consideration. He was then twenty-one, and when he was twenty-four he invented a machine for making nails at one operation, and steel plates for bank-notes, which, it was supposed, could not be counterfeited. After living in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, he went to England in the year 1815, where he perfected steam-engines, and for many years carried on a large manufactory in London. He originated the process used by bank-note engravers for transferring an engraving from one steel plate to another, and perfected many other inventions, for which he received the gold medal of the Society of Arts in London. He died in London, England, July 30, 1849.
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