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Lewis. As the regiment passed through the town en route for their destination, they rode in columns of fours; every man wearing a smiling countenance, as if going on a holiday parade. They crossed the river at a point near this town, and followed the road on the margin of the river to Pollocksville. They took five days rations in the wagons, with the usual ambulances and other necessary equipage. On reaching Pollocksville, twelve miles distant from here, they found the bridge across Mill Creek, a tributary of the Trent, destroyed. This bridge was forty feet long, and was destroyed by the rebels last summer. From this place to Pollocksville the road, although sandy and level, is skirted by dense pine woods, here and there interspersed by swamps; yet it was considered in good order, for this part of the country. Here and there, as the regiment proceeded, was seen an old plantation owner's home, and the usual concomitants in the distance, the frail negro huts. After reaching
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
nfed. 36 killed, 150 wounded. January 26, 1862: Keetsville, Mo. Union, 6th Mo. Cav. Confed., Ross' Texas Rangers. Losses: Union 2 killed, 1 wounded. Confed. 3 killed, 1 missing. March, 1862. March 1, 1862: Pittsburg Landing, Tenn. Union, 32d Ill. and U. S. Gunboats Lexington and Tyler. Confed., Gen. Daniel Ruggles' command. Losses: Union 5 killed, 5 wounded. Confed. 20 killed, 200 wounded. March 6-8, 1862: Pea Ridge, Ark., including engagements at Bentonville, Leetown, and Elkhorn tavern. Union, 25th, 35th, 36th, 37th, 44th, and 59th Ill., 2d, 3d, 12th, 15th, 17th, 24th Mo., and Phelps' Mo., 8th, 18th, and 22d Ind., 4th and 9th Iowa, 3d Iowa Cav., 3d and 15th Ill. Cav., 1st, 4th, 5th, and 6th Mo. Cav., Batteries B and F 2d Mo. Light Artil., 2d Ohio Battery, 1st Ind. Battery, Battery A 2d Ill. Artil. Confed., 1st, 2d Mo. State Guard, Greene's Brigade, 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th Mo., 4th, 14th, 16th, 17th, 19th, 21st, 22d Ark., 1st, 2d Ark
t the units of Sherman's army looked like as they pressed on toward Fayetteville and the last battle in the Carolinas, Bentonville, where General Johnston made a brave stand before falling back upon Raleigh. The men of the march to the sea were chahe roads did not seem to stop them, nor the fact that they had to fight as they pressed on. During the forced march to Bentonville the right wing, under General Howard, marched twenty miles, almost without a halt, skirmishing most of the way. the n had placed his whole army, probably thirty-five thousand men, in the form of a V, the sides embracing the village of Bentonville. Slocum engaged the Confederates while Howard was hurried to the scene. On two days, the 19th and 20th of March, Sheerable losses on both sides, withdrew his army during the night, and the Union army moved to Goldsboro. The losses at Bentonville were: Federal, 1,604; Confederate, 2,348. At Goldsboro the Union army was reenforced by its junction with Schofield
t the units of Sherman's army looked like as they pressed on toward Fayetteville and the last battle in the Carolinas, Bentonville, where General Johnston made a brave stand before falling back upon Raleigh. The men of the march to the sea were chahe roads did not seem to stop them, nor the fact that they had to fight as they pressed on. During the forced march to Bentonville the right wing, under General Howard, marched twenty miles, almost without a halt, skirmishing most of the way. the n had placed his whole army, probably thirty-five thousand men, in the form of a V, the sides embracing the village of Bentonville. Slocum engaged the Confederates while Howard was hurried to the scene. On two days, the 19th and 20th of March, Sheerable losses on both sides, withdrew his army during the night, and the Union army moved to Goldsboro. The losses at Bentonville were: Federal, 1,604; Confederate, 2,348. At Goldsboro the Union army was reenforced by its junction with Schofield
. March 16, 1865: Averysboroa, N. C. Union, Twentieth Corps and Kilpatrick's Cav.; Confed., Gen. Hardee's command. Losses: Union, 93 killed, 531 wounded; Confed., 108 killed, 540 wounded, 217 missing. March 19-21, 1865: Bentonville, N. C. Union, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Seventeenth, and Twentieth Corps, and Kilpatrick's Cav.; Confed., Gen. J. E. Johnston's army and Wade Hampton's Cav. Losses: Union, 191 killed, 1168 wounded, 287 missing; Confed., 239 killed, 169ams. At Savannah the troops again had the honor of being the first to enter an evacuated city, the second division marching in on the morning of December 21, 1864. In the march through the Carolinas the corps was in the thick of the fight at Bentonville, repulsing successive attacks with the aid of its artillery. Another change in the commanding officer was made on April 2d, when General J. A. Mower succeeded General A. S. Williams When this cruel war is over Ready to till the fields
nder Gen. R. E. Lee in the summer and fall of that year, and under Stonewall Jackson, in his winter campaign. Mustered out in March, 1862, the men of Company D, organized as Company B, Twelfth Georgia Batt., served for a time in Eastern Tennessee, then on the coast of Georgia and last with the Army of Tennessee under Johnston and Hood in the Dalton and Atlanta campaign, and Hood's dash to Nashville in the winter of 1864. Again transferred with the remnant of that army, they fought at Bentonville, N. C., and surrendered with Johnston's army, April 26, 1865, at Greensboro, N. C. Some significant figures pertaining to Georgia volunteers appear in a pamphlet compiled by Captain J. M. Folsom, printed at Macon, in 1864, Heroes and Martyrs of Georgia. Among 16,000 men considered, 11,000 were original members of the organizations in which they served, and 5,000 were recruits who joined from time to time between 1861 and 1864. Only 100 were conscripts. Of the total number treated of by Cap
eptember, 1864, Sheridan had driven the Confederates up the Valley, and in early October had retreated northward. Early followed, but he was soon out of supplies. He was obliged to fight or fall back. At an early hour on the foggy morning of October 19th, he attacked the unsuspecting Union army encamped along Cedar Creek and drove it back in confusion. General Sheridan, who had made a flying visit to Washington, spent the night of the 18th at Winchester on his way back to the army. At Mill Creek, half a mile south of Winchester, he came in sight of the fugitives. An officer who was at the front gives this account: ‘Far away in the rear was heard cheer after cheer. What was the cause? Were reinforcements coming? Yes, Phil Sheridan was coming, and he was a host. . . . Dashing along the pike, he came upon the line of battle. What troops are those? shouted Sheridan. The Sixth Corps, was the response from a hundred voices. We are all right, said Sheridan, as he swung his old ha
red again at Missionary Ridge, and in the spring of 1864, when it stood against Sherman through the Atlanta campaign. The regiment fought on through the campaigns from Savannah, Georgia, up to North Carolina, and in the last combat at Bentonville, North Carolina. It surrendered at Greensboro, April, 26, 1865. battle, but indicate the percentage of those suffered by the victors only. These show fighting losses. In losses by a defeated army, those received in retreating cannot be separated full report of losses Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 18646443,4301,5915,6653201,5401,0502,910 Franklin, Tenn., Nov. 30, 18641891,0331,1042,3361,75038007026,252 Nashville, Tenn., Dec. 15-16, 18643872,5621123,061No report of killed and wounded Bentonville, N. C., Mar. 19, 18651397941701,1031951,3136102,118 Appomattox, Va., Mar. 29–Apr. 9, 18651,3167,7501,71410,780No report of losses Petersburg, Va., Apr. 2, 18656253,1893264,140No report of losses Confederate generals killed in battle Gr
Tennessee, December 13, 1862, and was commanded during its existence by Brigadier-Generals S. R. Curtis, Frederick Steele, E. A. Carr, and W. A. Gorman. This army fought many minor but important engagements in Missouri and Arkansas, including Bentonville, Sugar Creek, and Pea Ridge. Major-General Samuel Ryan Curtis (U. S. M. A. 1831) was born near Champlain, New York, February, 1807, and resigned from the army to become a civil engineer and, later, a lawyer. He served as colonel of volt engagement with Forrest at Columbus, Georgia, on April 16th. One division of this corps, under Brigadier-General Judson Kilpatrick, consisting of four brigades, accompanied Sherman's army through Georgia and the Carolinas, and was present at Bentonville and Johnston's surrender. Federal generals--no. 21 Ohio (continued) Emerson Opdycke, brevetted for gallantry at the battle of Franklin. Henry Van Ness Boynton, Decorated for gallantry in action. Joseph Warren Keifer, orig
-the City of Petersburg. Joseph Eggleston Johnston Johnston commanded the First and the Last Great Aggressive Movements of Confederate Armies—Bull Run and Bentonville. and attempted to prevent Sherman's advance through the Carolinas. Johnston's capitulation was agreed upon near Durham's Station, North Carolina, April 26, 18oner. He died at Gainesville, Georgia, January 2, 1904. Lieutenant-generals of the Confederacy—group no. 2 Wade Hampton fought from Bull Run to Bentonville. With J. E. B. Stuart's Cavalry he stood in the way of Sheridan at Trevilian Station in 1864. Richard Henry Anderson commanded a brigade on the Peninsula; la80, and in 1891-1897. Lieutenant-generals of the Confederacy—group no. 3 Alexander peter Stewart a leader in every great campaign from Shiloh to Bentonville. Nathan Bedford Forrest, the American Murat and the King of mounted Raiders. Joseph Wheeler, Masterful as well as Indefatigable and Indomitable leader of Ca<
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