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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 25 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 22 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 22 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 21 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 20 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) or search for Mobile, Ala. (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 112 results in 60 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nicaragua. (search)
landed on the Nicaraguan coast, Nov. 25, and was seized by Commodore Paulding, United States navy, Dec. 3, with 230 of his followers, and taken to New York as prisoner. James Buchanan was then President of the United States. He privately commended Paulding's act, but for prudential reasons, he said, he publicly condemned the commodore in a special message to Congress, Jan. 7, 1858, for thus violating the sovereignty of a foreign country! Buchanan set Walker and his followers free, and they traversed the slave-labor States, preaching a new crusade against Central America, and collecting funds for a new invasion. Walker sailed from Mobile on a third expedition, but was arrested off the mouth of the Mississippi River, but only for having left port without a clearance. He was tried at New Orleans by the United States Court and acquitted, when he hastened to Central America, and after making much mischief there, was captured and shot at Truxillo, Sept. 12, 1860. Nicaragua Canal
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Palmer, James Shedden 1810-1867 (search)
Palmer, James Shedden 1810-1867 Naval officer; born in New Jersey in 1810; entered the navy as midshipman in 1825, and was promoted rear-admiral in 1866. He served in the East India seas in 1838, and in blockading the coast of Mexico from 1846 to 1848. At the beginning of the Civil War he was in the blockade fleet under Dupont. In the summer of 1863 he led the advance in the passage of the Vicksburg batteries, and later in the same year performed the same service. Palmer was Farragut's flag-captain in the expedition against New Orleans and Mobile, and fought the Confederate ram Arkansas. In 1865 he was assigned to the command of the North Atlantic squadron. He died in St. Thomas, W. I., Dec. 7, 1867.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pensacola. (search)
Feb. 28, 1781, Galvez the Spanish governor of Louisiana, sailed from New Orleans with 1,400 men to seize Pensacola. He could effect but little alone; but finally he was joined (May 9) by an armed squadron from Havana, and by a reinforcement from Mobile. Galvez now gained possession of the harbor of Pensacola, and soon afterwards Colonel Campbell, who commanded the British garrison there, surrendered. Pensacola and the rest of Florida had passed into the possession of the British by the treatyere proclaimed (Aug. 4) as the van of a much larger naval force. Col. Edward Nichols had been permitted to land a small body of troops at Pensacola, and to draw around him, arm, and train hostile refugee Creeks. Jackson's headquarters were at Mobile. Late in August the mask of Spanish neutrality was removed, when nine British vessels of war lay at anchor in the harbor of Pensacola, and Colonel Nichols was made a welcome guest of the Spanish governor. A British flag, raised over one of the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Petersburg. (search)
mond north of that city. The opportunity offered towards the middle of February. Lee had drawn the greater portion of his forces from the Shenandoah Valley, and Sheridan, under instructions, made a grand cavalry raid against the northern communications with the Confederate capital, and especially for the seizure of Lynchburg. It was a most destructive march, and very bewildering to the Confederates. This raid, the junction of the National armies in North Carolina, and the operations at Mobile and in Central Alabama satisfied Lee that he could no longer maintain his position, unless, by some means, his army might be vastly increased and new and ample resources for its supply obtained. He had recommended the emancipation of the slaves and making soldiers of them, but the slave interest was too powerful in the civil councils of the Confederacy to obtain a law to that effect. Viewing the situation calmly, he saw no hope for the preservation of his army from starvation or capture,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Reynolds, Joseph Jones 1822-1899 (search)
Reynolds, Joseph Jones 1822-1899 Military officer; born in Flemingsburg, Ky., Jan. 4, 1822; graduated at West Point in 1843, where he was assistant professor from 1846 to 1855. He entered the service in the Civil War as colonel of the 10th Indiana Volunteers, and was made a brigadier-general in May, 1861. He was at first active in western Virginia, and then in the Army of the Cumberland, 1862-63. He was Rosecrans's chief of staff in the battle of Chickamauga, and in the summer of 1864 commanded the 19th Army Corps, and organized a force for the capture of Forts Morgan and Gaines, near Mobile. Late in 1864 he was placed in command of the Department of Arkansas, where he remained until April, 1866. In March, 1867, he was brevetted major-general, United States army; in 1867-72 commanded the 5th Military District; in 1871 was elected United States Senator from Texas, but declined; and in 1877 was retired. He died in Washington, D. C., Feb. 26, 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Semmes, Raphael 1809-1877 (search)
ey steamer Poinsett in 1843, and the brig Porpoise in 1846. In the war against Mexico, he was volunteer aid to General Worth, and was secretary to the lighthouse board from 1859 to 1861. He accepted the command in the Confederate navy of the steamer Sumter, with which he depredated upon American commerce. In England the fast-sailing vessel Ala- Bama (q. v. ), was built, furnished, and chiefly manned for him, in which he put to sea in August, 1863, and made a destructive cruise against American vessels and American commerce. She was sunk Raphael Semmes. by the Kearsarge off Cherbourg, June 19, 1864. Afterwards Semmes was appointed Professor of Moral Philosophy in the State Seminary of Louisiana, at Alexandria. He wrote Service afloat and ashore during the Mexican War; The campaign of General Scott in the Valley of Mexico; Memoirs of service afloat during the War between the States; and The cruise of the Alabama. He died in Mobile, Ala., Aug. 30, 1877. Senate, United States
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sewall, Rufus King 1814- (search)
Sewall, Rufus King 1814- Author; born in Edgecombe, Me., Jan. 22, 1814; graduated at Bowdoin College in 1837, and at Bangor Theological Seminary in 1841; later studied law at Mobile, Ala.; was admitted to the bar in Maine. He is the author of Ancient Dominion of Maine; Ancient voyages to the Western continent; Memoir of Joseph Sewall, D. D., etc.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sherman, William Tecumseh 1820-1829 (search)
he line of his march eastward presented a black path of desolation. No public property of the Confederates was spared. The station-houses and rolling-stock of the railways were burned. The track was torn up, and the rails, heated by the burning ties cast into heaps, were twisted and ruined. Sherman intended to push on to Montgomery, Ala., and then, if circumstances appeared favorable, to go south- Sherman and his Generals. Sherman's troops burning a Railroad Station. ward and attack Mobile. He waited at Meridian for Gen. W. S. Smith to join him with a considerable force of cavalry, but that officer was held back by the Confederate forces under Forrest and others. After waiting in vain for a week, Sherman laid Meridian in ashes, and returned to Vicksburg with 500 prisoners and 5,000 liberated slaves. This raid created great consternation, for General Polk, with his 15,000 men, made but a feeble resistance. Sherman's loss was 171 men. General Grant arranged two grand camp
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Shiloh, battle of (search)
Shiloh, battle of After the capture of Fort Donelson in 1862, General Grant prepared to push towards Corinth, an important position at the intersection of the Charleston and Memphis, Mobile and Ohio railways. Possession of that point would give the National troops control of the great railway communications between the Mississippi and the East, and the border slave-labor States and the Gulf of Mexico. Passing up the Tennessee River, the main body of Grant's troops were encamped, at the beginning of April, between Pittsburgh Landing, on that stream, and Shiloh Map of the Shiloh campaign. Meeting-house, in the forest, 2 miles from the river bank. General Beauregard, under the supreme command of Gen. A, Sidney Johnston, was straining every nerve to resist this movement. He confronted the Nationals near Shiloh Meeting-house, where he was assisted by Generals Pope, Hardee, Bragg, and Breckinridge. With these expert leaders the Confederates had come up from Corinth in a heavy
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Sieges. (search)
Canada1814 Fort Brown, Texas1846 Monterey, Mexico1846 Puebla, Mexico1847 Vera Cruz, Mexico1847 Fort Pickens, Florida1861 Corinth, Mississippi1862 Fort Pulaski, Georgia1862 Island No.10, Kentucky1862 Fort Wagner, South Carolina1863 Port Hudson, Louisiana1863 Vicksburg, Mississippi1863 Atlanta, Georgia1864 Forts Gaines and Morgan, Mobile, Alabama1864 Fort Fisher, North Carolina1864-65 Richmond, Virginia1864-65 Fort Blakely and Spanish Fort, Mobile, Alabama1865 Santiago, Cuba1898 Canada1814 Fort Brown, Texas1846 Monterey, Mexico1846 Puebla, Mexico1847 Vera Cruz, Mexico1847 Fort Pickens, Florida1861 Corinth, Mississippi1862 Fort Pulaski, Georgia1862 Island No.10, Kentucky1862 Fort Wagner, South Carolina1863 Port Hudson, Louisiana1863 Vicksburg, Mississippi1863 Atlanta, Georgia1864 Forts Gaines and Morgan, Mobile, Alabama1864 Fort Fisher, North Carolina1864-65 Richmond, Virginia1864-65 Fort Blakely and Spanish Fort, Mobile, Alabama1865 Santiago, Cuba1898
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