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Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 18 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 17 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 1 Browse Search
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown 16 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 16 4 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 16 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 15 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 15 7 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) or search for Montgomery (Alabama, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 40 results in 33 document sections:

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with a detachment of the Third New York cavalry, and two pieces of Allis's artillery, under the command of Major Garrard, proceeded, on the twenty-ninth ultimo, up the Pungo Creek, N. C., where they captured two rebel schooners. Proceeding to Montgomery, the troops disembarked. Major Garrard then marched his force to Germantown, Swanquarter, and Middletown, capturing in these places one hundred and thirty horses and mules, and twenty-five prisoners, among whom were a rebel lieutenant-colonel, a major, a captain, and a lieutenant. To-day, on returning from Middletown, they were met by a squad of rebel cavalry, on whom they opened one of their field-pieces, when they fled at the first fire. The force then returned to Montgomery, and embarked on the steamer without further molestation.--Philadelphia Ledger. At New Orleans, La., General Butler issued the following orders:-- No pass to go beyond the lines of this army, in any direction, will be respected by any officer or sol
much evil, not only to the contending parties, but also to nations which have taken no part in the conflict. Her Majesty, however, has seen no reason to depart from the strict neutrality which Her Majesty has observed from the beginning of the contest. --Colonel Richardson, the rebel guerrilla, issued an order requiring all men of West-Tennessee, between the ages of eighteen and forty-five, to report to his camp under the rebel conscription law. The following instructions were issued to govern them in carrying out the order: If a man should absent himself from home to avoid the order, burn his house and all his property, except such as may be useful to this command. If a man resists this by refusing to report, shoot him down and leave him dying. If a man takes refuge in his house and offers resistance, set the house on fire, and guard it, so he may not get out. William L. Yancey, a member of the rebel Senate from Alabama, who died yesterday, was buried at Montgomery.
December 28. The Seventh Wisconsin regiment left the army of the Potomac for home to recruit, under the general orders lately issued.--the Legislature of Alabama has voted that the carpets that cover the floor of the Senate Chamber, Hall of Representatives, and all officers' and committee-rooms in the capitol at Montgomery, be cut up and given to the soldiers of the rebel army for blankets.--an attempt at informal renewal of the cartel was made by the enemy, under the immediate agency of General Butler, who initiated his effort by sending five hundred confederate soldiers to City Point. Commissioner Ould returned five hundred Federal soldiers, but informed Commissioner Hitchcock that the confederate authorities could hold no communication with General Butler, and that there must be no further effort at a partial exchange. If the enemy desire to renew the cartel, it must be done upon fair terms, and through an agent not outlawed and beyond the pale of military respectability.--R
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