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Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Leaves from a Roman diary: February, 1869 (Rewritten in 1897) (search)
o beautifully? You must have been inspired. This, she said, had all the effect of flattery without being intended for it, and was so much the more mischievous. Emerson and Margaret Fuller, said Mrs. X-- , put inspiration in the place of religion. They believed that some people had direct communication with the Almighty. P — and I thought this might be true of Miss Fuller, but doubted it in Emerson's case. Miss X-- told me that she had lately ascended to the rotunda of the Capitol, from which the pope's flag flies all day, and that she had asked the Swiss guard what he would do if she hoisted the tricolor there. He replied: I should shoot you. Nothi since observed that poets as a class are not fair critics of poetry; for they are sure to prefer poetry which is like their own. This is true at least of Lowell, Emerson, or Matthew Arnold; but when I came to read The Ring and the book I found that Longfellow's objection was a valid one. I remarked that Rev. Mr. Longfellow had
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches, Centennial Contributions (search)
ieve that they have not been broken. The Emerson centennial: Emerson and the great poets Reyndall, the chemist, who seemed to appreciate Emerson's poetry, and few others who might be said tothe man himself. Tyndall may have recognized Emerson's keen insight for the poetry of science in s and Edwin Arnold had no very high opinion of Emerson's poetry; and even Carlyle, who was Emerson'sEmerson's best friend in Europe, spoke of it in rather a disparaging manner. The Mountain and the Squirrel similar experiences to those which developed Emerson's mind and character, and could therefore comend him better than others. We all feel that Emerson's poetry is sometimes too abstruse, especiallhuman nature; and it is in these latter that Emerson often comes close to him. Most widely known os are not exactly Dantean, but they are among Emerson's finest, and worthy of any great poet. The ne. It is still more difficult to compare Emerson with Shakespeare, for the one was Puritan wit[10 more...]
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Dedication. (search)
Dedication. To Wendell Phillips, Ralph Waldo Emerson, and Henry D. Thoreau, defenders of the faithful, who, when the mob shouted, madman! said, Saint! I humbly and gratefully dedicate this book. James Redpath
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Epigraphs (search)
Epigraphs The Saint, whose fate yet hangs in suspense, but whose martyrdom, if it shall be perfected, will make the gallows glorious like the Cross. --Ralph Waldo Emerson. He was one who recognized no unjust human laws, but resisted them as he was bid. No man in America has ever stood up so persistently for the dignity of human nature, knowing himself for man, and the equal of any and all governments. He could not have been tried by his peers, for his peers did not exist. --Henry D. Thoreau. God makes him the text, and all he asks of our comparatively cowardly lips is to preach the sermon, and say to the American people that, whether that old man succeeded in a worldly sense or not, he stood a representative of law, of government, of right, of justice, of religion, and they were pirates that gathered about him, and sought to wreak vengeance by taking his life. The banks of the Potomac, doubly dear now to History and to Man! The dust of Washington rests there; an
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Book 1: he keepeth the sheep. (search)
o doubt. Not a bit of it, quoth Carlyle; they appealed to the Eternal God! So with these whom I visited. I was :he first person who had penetrated their solitude from the outer world since the thunderbolt had fallen. Do not imagine that they asked, What is the world saying of us? Will justice be done to the memory of our martyrs? Will men build the tombs of the prophets? Will the great thinkers of the age affirm that our father makes the gallows glorious, like the cross? It was Emerson who uttered this truth of John Brown's death. J. R. Not at all; they asked but one question after I had told them how little hope there was of acquittal or rescue. Does it seem as if freedom were to gain or lose by this? That was all. Their mother spoke the spirit of them all to me, next day, when she said, I have had thirteen children, and only four are left; but if I am to see the ruin of my house, I cannot but hope that Providence may bring out of it some benefit to the poor slaves.
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 5: North Elba. (search)
o doubt. Not a bit of it, quoth Carlyle; they appealed to the Eternal God! So with these whom I visited. I was :he first person who had penetrated their solitude from the outer world since the thunderbolt had fallen. Do not imagine that they asked, What is the world saying of us? Will justice be done to the memory of our martyrs? Will men build the tombs of the prophets? Will the great thinkers of the age affirm that our father makes the gallows glorious, like the cross? It was Emerson who uttered this truth of John Brown's death. J. R. Not at all; they asked but one question after I had told them how little hope there was of acquittal or rescue. Does it seem as if freedom were to gain or lose by this? That was all. Their mother spoke the spirit of them all to me, next day, when she said, I have had thirteen children, and only four are left; but if I am to see the ruin of my house, I cannot but hope that Providence may bring out of it some benefit to the poor slaves.
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 1: Whetting the sword. (search)
a gesture and voice never to be forgotten by those who heard him, denounced the administration and the South for their work in Kansas. He spent several days in Concord, and made the acquaintance of many of its citizens; among others, of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry D. Thoreau, who have testified so clearly to his nobility of character. Near the end of March, 1857, being on my way to Washington, I met Capt. Brown in New York City, and spent a night with him at the Metropolitan Hotel. Capt to Philadelphia, and while there I was taken unwell, and could scarcely sit up. Capt. Brown nursed me as much as I had need of, and showed great skill and tenderness. In May he set out for Kansas, and I lost sight of him for nearly a year. Emerson is reported at this time to have said that John Brown was the truest hero-man he had ever met. Theodore Parker, also, said to a friend of mine, who spoke of Captain Montgomery as a man of more harmonious and cultivated intellect than John Brown,
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, The idealist among idealists. (search)
ebruary, and soon after appeared before a committee of the Massachusetts Legislature. .... In March he visited Concord, and spoke at a public meeting in the Town Hall, where, I am told, he exhibited the chain worn by his son John in Kansas, and, with a gesture and voice never to be forgotten by those who heard him, denounced the administration and the South for their work in Kansas. He spent several days in Concord, and made the acquaintance of many of its citizens; among others, of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry D. Thoreau, who have testified so clearly to his nobility of character. Near the end of March, 1857, being on my way to Washington, I met Capt. Brown in New York City, and spent a night with him at the Metropolitan Hotel. Capt. Brown objected to the show and extravagance of such an establishment, and said he preferred a plain tavern, where drovers and farmers lodged in a plain way. We went on to Philadelphia, and while there I was taken unwell, and could scarcely sit up.
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion, The death of John, the West Virginia blacksmith. (search)
The death of John, the West Virginia blacksmith. Miss L. M. Alcott, the accomplished daughter of A. B. Alcott, the Concord philosopher, and the bosom friend of Ralph Waldo Emerson, was for a time a nurse in one of the hospitals for the wounded in the vicinity of Washington, D. C. She subsequently published a little volume, entitled Hospital sketches, in which the life, heroism, and death of some of our brave fellows, wounded in the struggle for the nation's life, are portrayed with a graphic power which has never been surpassed. Among these descriptions of life and death in the hospital, none surpasses, in beauty and pathos, the story of John, the West Virginia Blacksmith. Miss Alcott is in one of the wards of the hospital, ministering to the sick, when a messenger from another ward comes in with the expected yet dreaded message: John is going, ma'am, and wants to see you if you can come. The moment this boy is asleep; tell him so, and let me know if I am in danger o
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 1: Margaret Fuller Ossoli — Introductory. (search)
ened that Margaret Fuller had upon me, through her writings, a more immediate intellectual influence than any one except Emerson, and possibly Parker. All this guarantees that warm feeling of personal interest, without which no memoir can be well wublication of the Memoirs, --and to which I have referred always as the Fuller Mss. ; (2) Margaret Fuller's letters to Mr. Emerson, kindly lent me by Mr. Emerson's executors; (3) her letters to Dr. F. H. Hedge, lent me by himself; (4) those to the HMr. Emerson's executors; (3) her letters to Dr. F. H. Hedge, lent me by himself; (4) those to the Hon. A. G. Greene, of Providence, R. I., sent me by his daughter, Mrs. S. C. Eastman, of Concord, N. H.; (5) those to the Hon. George T. Davis, shown to me by his son, James C. Davis, Esq.; (6) many letters and papers of different periods, sent to meen some aid, especially Horace Greeley's Recollections of a busy life, Weiss's Life of Theodore Parker, and the Carlyle-Emerson correspondence; but the main reliance has necessarily been placed on material not hitherto made public; and to all the f
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