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Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 13, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Missouri Volunteers. (search)
. Expedition to St. Genevieve August 15-16. Moved to Paducah, Ky., September 7-8, and duty there till February 5, 1862. Expedition to Caseyville, Ky., November 30, 1861 (3 Cos.). Moved to Fort Henry, Tenn., February 5, 1862. Investment and capture of Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 12-16. Expedition to Clarksville February 19-21. Moved to Savannah, Tenn. Expedition toward Purdy and operations about Crump's Landing March 9-14. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7. Lick Creek April 24. Corinth Road April 25. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Russell House, near Corinth, May 17. March to Memphis, Tenn., June 3-21, via Lagrange, Holly Springs and Moscow. Duty at Memphis till November. Expedition to Coldwater and Hernando, Miss., September 9-13. Grant's Central Mississippi Campaign November-December. Tallahatchie March November 26-December 12. Sherman's Yazoo Expedition December 20, 1862, to January 3, 1863. Chi
river that encircles Resacca and Tilton, that the enemy made a stand after being closely pressed on his retreat from Dalton. From our centre to the river, the distance this morning was about seven miles. Our line extends completely around the valley, McPherson's right resting on the river near its junction with the Oothkalaga Creek, or Calhoun, while the left strikes the river north of Tilton, near the junction of the river with Swamp Creek, that takes its rise in the hills of Sugar Valley. Lick and Camp creeks also burst out from the hills in the valley and empty their waters into the Oostenaula River, which is very broad and deep, but can be forded, when the water is low, at six points. The above is as intelligible a description of the field as can be given without the aid of a map; and now for the opening of the ball. As I have already said, our line was formed in a half circle, extending from the river on the left to a point on the river near Calhoun. The corps occupied posi
ies in the way of an effective organization. The enemy was in position about a mile in advance of Shiloh church — a rude, log chapel, from which the battle that was to ensue took its name --with the right resting on Owl Creek and his left on Lick Creek. The army collected here was composed of the flower of the Federal troops, being principally Western men, from the States of Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin, and Iowa. It was expected by Gen. Beauregard that he would be able to reach the enemyvening of the 5th; and it was then decided that the attack should be made on the next morning, at the earliest hour practicable. The Confederate plan of battle was in three lines — the first and second extending from Owl Creek on the left to Lick Creek on the right, a distance of about three miles, supported by the third and the reserve. The first line, under Major-Gen. Hardee, was constituted of his corps, augmented on his right by Gladden's brigade, of Major-Gen. Bragg's corps. The second
took his horses, mules, wagons and portable property, near Kingston, then proceeded to the Confederate saltpeter works, on Buffalo river, captured 15 or 20 of the small force in charge under Lieutenant Kinkade, and destroyed the works, burning the buildings. The lieutenant and 7 of his men made their escape. On the same day, Captain Crawley and a small Confederate force met a detachment of Col. Powell Clayton's Fifth Kansas cavalry and of the Second Wisconsin cavalry; at the crossing of Lick creek, twelve miles from Helena, and routed it, taking 20 prisoners, besides killing and wounding many of the enemy. Brigadier-General Gorman, having sent 1,200 Federal cavalry to Clarendon on White river, moved to St. Charles on White river, accompanied by the two gunboats St. Louis and Cincinnati, and finding the post evacuated by the Confederates, garrisoned it with 800 infantry. He then proceeded on transport to Devall's Bluff, which he occupied January 17th, capturing on the cars, read
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
4, G1; 159, G13 Liberty, Mo. 119, 1; 135-A; 161, A11, 135-A; 161, C10; 171 Liberty, Tenn. 24, 3; 30, 2; 135-A; 150, H8 Liberty, Va. 22, 7; 81, 6; 87, 2, 87, 4; 100, 1; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A; 171 Liberty Church, Va. 7, 1; 78, 1, 78, 2; 135, 5 Liberty Gap, Tenn. 32, 5; 34, 3; 118, 1; 149, A7 Skirmishes near, June 24-27, 1863 32, 5 Liberty Mills, Va. 45, 1; 74, 1; 84, 7, 84, 9; 85, 3; 87, 4; 100, 1; Skirmish, Dec. 23 [22?], 1864 84, 7 Lick Creek, Tenn. 10, 10; 12, 4, 12, 5; 13, 1; 14, 2, 14, 3; 24, 3; 30, 2; 78, 3; 142, C6; 149, A2, 149, A5, 149, B3 Licking, Mo. 135-A; 152, H5; 153, A4 Licking River, Ky. 103, 2; 117, 1; 135-A; 141, C2; 151, D13, 151, E13 Limestone Ridge, Va. 136, F6 Fort Lincoln, Kans. 119, 1; 161 G9 Linden, Mo. 119, 1; 171 Linden, Tenn. 24, 3; 135-A; 149, B3 Linn Creek, Mo. 47, 1; 152, F3 Lisbon, Md. 27, 1; 100, 1; 116, 2; 136, E8 Lithonia, Ga. 101, 21; 11
erspersed with patches of cultivation, and reaching back from the bluffs at Pittsburg Landing, from two and a half to three miles. Snake creek on the north, and Lick creek on the south, run almost at right angles with the Tennessee, and empty into it about three miles apart. These were the right and left defences of the national then came Prentiss, more in advance again, and on the extreme left was Stuart, commanding a detached brigade of Sherman's division, and covering the crossing of Lick creek. Hurlbut was massed and in reserve, to the rear and left of Prentiss. There was a short interval between Prentiss and Stuart, which, however, Hurlbut completeire. There were no intrenchments, for the Western troops had not yet learned the lesson of de. fence which they afterwards applied so well. The north bank of Lick creek, however, is extremely steep and rugged, and formed a natural cover to the extreme left, while nearly a mile inside of the creek, the landing was again protecte
creek, to strike the railroad at Burnsville. But floods prevented our reaching the railroad, when General Smith ordered me in person also to disembark at Pittsburg Landing, and take post well out, so as to make plenty of room, with Snake and Lick creeks the flanks of a camp for the grand army of invasion. It was General Smith who selected that field of battle, and it was well chosen. On any other we surely would have been overwhelmed, as both Lick and Snake creeks forced the enemy to conLick and Snake creeks forced the enemy to confine his movement to a direct front attack which new troops are better qualified to resist than where the flanks are exposed to a real or chimerical danger. Even the divisions of that army were arranged in that camp by General Smith's order, my division forming, as it were, the outlying picket, whilst McClernand and Prentiss's were the real line of battle, with W. H. L. Wallace in support of the right wing, and Hurlbut of the left; Lewis Wallace's division being detached. All these subordinate
are connected by a good ridge road. Another road from Corinth follows a line south of the other, runs through Monterey and into the ridge road between Owl and Lick creeks, where the Federal line was posted. From Monterey a road ran north to Purdy, intersecting the ridge road, and another ran northward toward Savannah, also inter the close of Monday's fight. Chalmers', mainly a Mississippi brigade, at the opening of the battle was in the second line on the extreme right, extending to Lick creek. As Johnston's plan was to turn the Federal left and drive the enemy into the point between Owl creek and the Tennessee, it is evident that Chalmers' men had a ravine about half a mile to the opposite hill, where they were halted by order of General Johnston. Later, Chalmers renewed the attack; his right resting on Lick creek bottom, and skirmishers were thrown out under Major Whitfield of the Ninth. With irresistible gallantry Chalmers drove the enemy by hard fighting from two stro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
o which he had given his heart and his sword. I will not attempt to go into the details of this great battle. General Beauregard says, in his report: The remnant of the enemy's army had been driven into utter disorder to the immediate vicinity of Pittsburg Landing, under the heavy guns of the iron-clad gunboats. Like an Alpine avalanche, our troops moved forward, despite the determined resistance of the enemy, and at 6 P. M. we were in possession of all his encampments between Owl and Lick Creeks but one, nearly all of his field artillery, thirty flags, colors and standards, over three thousand prisoners, including a division commander (General Prentiss), several brigade commanders, thousands of small arms, an immense supply of subsistance, forage and munitions of war—all the substantial fruits of a complete victory. The last great charge was finally made. Says his biographer: General Johnston had passed through the ordeal seemingly unhurt. His noble horse was shot in four plac
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Laying the corner Stone of the monument tomb of the Army of Tennessee Association, New Orleans. (search)
o which he had given his heart and his sword. I will not attempt to go into the details of this great battle. General Beauregard says, in his report: The remnant of the enemy's army had been driven into utter disorder to the immediate vicinity of Pittsburg Landing, under the heavy guns of the iron-clad gunboats. Like an Alpine avalanche, our troops moved forward, despite the determined resistance of the enemy, and at 6 P. M. we were in possession of all his encampments between Owl and Lick Creeks but one, nearly all of his field artillery, thirty flags, colors and standards, over three thousand prisoners, including a division commander (General Prentiss), several brigade commanders, thousands of small arms, an immense supply of subsistance, forage and munitions of war—all the substantial fruits of a complete victory. The last great charge was finally made. Says his biographer: General Johnston had passed through the ordeal seemingly unhurt. His noble horse was shot in four plac
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