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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for 1794 AD or search for 1794 AD in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Husbands, Hermann 1768- (search)
colony, and a leader among the opponents of the royal government called Regulators, in 1768, organized for the forcible redress of public grievances. When, on May 14, 1771, a battle began on the Allemance Creek between 1,000 men under Governor Tryon and 2,000 Regulators (in which the latter were defeated), Husbands declared that the peace principles of his sect would not allow him to fight. He had not objected to the arming of the people, but when they were about to use arms he rode away, and was never afterwards seen in that region until the struggle for independence was over. He had made his way to Pennsylvania, where, in 1771, he published an account of the Regulator movement. Husbands was a member of the Pennsylvania legislature in 1778, and was concerned in the whiskey insurrection in 1794, with Gallatin, Breckinridge, and others, as a committee of safety. For this offence he suffered a short imprisonment at Philadelphia. He died on his way home, near Philadelphia, in 1795.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Illiers, Count Henry Louis 1750-1794 (search)
Illiers, Count Henry Louis 1750-1794 Military officer; born in Luxembourg in 1750; was one of the French officers who served in the Revolutionary War; took part in the battle of Brandywine, where he saved Pulaski. He is the author of De la guerre d'amerique, etc. He died in Paris in 1794. Illiers, Count Henry Louis 1750-1794 Military officer; born in Luxembourg in 1750; was one of the French officers who served in the Revolutionary War; took part in the battle of Brandywine, where he saved Pulaski. He is the author of De la guerre d'amerique, etc. He died in Paris in 1794.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), entry impressment (search)
by their government to exercise this claimed right on board any American vessel, unless it was known it contained British deserters. In that shape this portion of a treaty then concluded remained, and was unsatisfactory because it was based upon contingencies and provisions, and not upon positive treaty stipulations. The American commissioners then, on their own responsibility, proceeded to treat upon other points in dispute, and an agreement was made, based principally upon Jay's treaty of 1794. The British made some concessions as to the rights of neutrals. The treaty was more favorable to the Americans, on the whole, than Jay's, and, for the reasons which induced him, the American commissioners signed it. It was satisfactory to the merchants and most of the people; yet the President, consulting only his Secretary of State, and without referring it to the Senate, rejected it. A cause of War. The British government claimed the right for commanders of British ships-of-war to
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Indiana, (search)
on as early as 1700. Indiana constituted a part of New France, and afterwards of the Northwest Territory. In 1702 some French Canadians discovered the Wabash, and established several trading-posts on its banks, among others, Vincennes. Little is known of the early settlers until the country was ceded to the English, in 1763. The treaty of 1783 included Indiana in the United States. A distressing Indian war broke out in 1788, but by victories by General Wilkinson (1791) and General Wayne (1794), a dangerous confederacy of the tribes was broken up. Another was afterwards attempted by Tecumseh, but was defeated by the result of the battle of Tippecanoe. In 1800 the Connecticut Reserve, in the northwestern portion of Ohio, having State seal of Indiana. been sold to a company of speculators, measures were taken to extinguish certain claims on the part of the United States and the State of Connecticut. The speculators found their bargain to be pecuniarily unprofitable, and likely
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ingersoll, Robert Green 1833- (search)
back to the convention, but too late to be of use. As most of the actors had suffered death, the tragedy was about over and the curtain was falling. Paine remained in Paris until the reign of terror was ended and that of the Corsican tyrant had commenced. Paine came back to America hoping to spend the remainder of his life surrounded by those for whose happiness and freedom he had labored so many years. He expected to be rewarded with the love and reverence of the American people. In 1794 James Monroe had written to Paine these words: It is unnecessary for me to tell you how much all your countrymen—I speak of the great mass of the people—are interested in your welfare. They have not forgot the history of their own Revolution and the difficult scenes through which they passed; nor do they review its several stages without reviving in their bosoms a due sensibility of the merits of those who served them in that great and arduous conflict. The crime of ingratitude has not
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Insurance. (search)
Insurance. The following is a brief summary of the insurance business in the United States in its principal forms: The first fire insurance in the colonies was written in Boston by the Sun Company (English) in 1728. Some insurance was done in Philadelphia in 1752. The first fire insurance policy issued in the United States was in Hartford. Conn., in 1794, under the unofficial title of Hartford fire insurance co. Sixteen years after, in 1810, the Hartford Fire Insurance Company was organized. From 1801-10 there were 60 charters issued; 1811-20, 43; 1821-30, 149; 1831-40, 467; 1841-50, 401; 1851-60, 896; 1861-70, 1,041. From Jan. 1, 1880, to Dec. 31, 1889, property of the citizens of the United States was insured against fire and accident on ocean, lake, and river, and by tornado, to the amount of over $120,000,000,000, for premiums of $1,156,675,391, and losses were paid of $647,726,051, being 56 per cent. of the premiums. The condition and transactions of fire companies
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Izard, George 1777-1828 (search)
Izard, George 1777-1828 Military officer; born in South Carolina in 1777; son of Ralph Izard. Having finished his education and Graves of the 11th Ohio battery-men. made a tour in Europe, he entered the United States army, in 1794, as lieutenant of artillery. He was appointed aide to General Hamilton in 1799; resigned in 1803; commissioned colonel of artillery in the spring of 1812; and promoted to brigadier-general in March, 1813. He was in command on Lake Champlain and on the Niagara frontier, in 1814, with the rank of major-general. From 1825 until his death he was governor of Arkansas Territory. Early in September, 1814, he moved towards Sackett's Harbor, under the direction of the Secretary of War, with about 4,000 troops, where he received a despatch from General Brown at Fort Erie, Sept. 10, urging him to move on to his support, as he had not more than 2,000 effective men. The first division of Izard's troops arrived at Lewiston on Oct. 5. He moved up to Black Rock,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Johnson, William 1771-1848 (search)
Johnson, William 1771-1848 Jurist; born in Charleston, S. C., Dec. 27, 1771; graduated at Princeton in 1790; admitted to the bar in 1793; elected to the State legislature in 1794; appointed an associate justice of the United States Supreme Court in 1804; served until his death, in Brooklyn, N. Y., Aug. 11, 1834. He is the author of the Life and correspondence of Maj.-Gen. Nathanael Greene. Lawyer; born in Middletown, Conn., about 1770; graduated at Yale College in 1788; reporter of the Supreme Court of New York in 1806-23, and of the New York Court of Chancery in 1814-23. He was the author of New York Supreme Court reports, 1799-1803; New York Chancery reports 1814-23; and Digest of cases in the Supreme Court of New York. He died in New York City in July, 1848.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kearny, Stephen Watts 1794-1847 (search)
Kearny, Stephen Watts 1794-1847 Military officer; born in Newark, N. J., Aug. 30, 1794; uncle of Gen. Philip Kearny. When the War of 1812-15 broke out young Kearny left his studies at Columbia College, entered the army as lieutenant of infantry, and distinguished himself in the battle of Queenston Heights. In April, 1813, he was made captain, and rose to brigadier-general in June, 1846. He was in command of the Army of the West at the beginning of the war with Mexico, and with that army marched to California, conquering New Mexico on the way. He established a provisional government at Santa Fe, pressed on to California, and was twice wounded in battle. For a few months in 1847 he was governor of California; joined the army in Mexico; in March, 1848, was governor, military and civil, of Vera Cruz, and in May of the same year was made governor of the city of Mexico. In August, 1848, he was brevetted major-general, and died in St. Louis, Mo., on Oct. 31, following. The Kearny
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Kenton, Simon -1836 (search)
e Alleghany Mountains, where he was the friend and companion of Daniel Boone in many daring feats. He was in expeditions against the Indians, was captured by them, and taken to Detroit. Escaping from a Brit- Simon Kenton. ish prison there in 1779, he distinguished himself in resisting the invasion of Kentucky by the British and Indians in that year. Finally, after an expedition against the Indians on the Miami, he settled (1784) near Maysville. He accompanied Wayne in his expedition in 1794. In 1805 he was seated near the Mud River, in Ohio, and was made brigadier-general of militia. In 1813 he served under Governor Shelby at the battle of the Thames. Beggared by lawsuits because of defective titles to lands, he lived in penury many years. In 1824 he appeared at Frankfort, Ky., in tattered clothes, and successfully appealed to the legislature to release the claim of the State to lands which were his. Congress afterwards allowed him a pension. He died in Logan county, O., Ap
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