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Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
specific authority to propose terms of peace had not been conferred, but that full powers would be conferred at Richmond, was telegraphed by Mr. Greeley to Mr. Lincoln, with request for further instructions. The instructions were brought by Colonel Hay and were of such a nature that all negotiations were abruptly ended. Mr. Lincoln's letter on this grave matter in which the vast interests of the people of the North and South were greatly concerned, began with an inexcusable flippancy like the heading of an advertisement of strayed cattle. This official letter of the President, dated July 18th, from the executive mansion, to be brought by Colonel Hay for delivery through Mr. Greeley to gentlemen who would be accredited by the belligerent Confederacy to propose peace was addressed: To whom it may concern. The body of the instructions following this promiscuous superscription merely authorized safety passports to accredited persons bringing the unconditional surrender of the Confe
s acting as assistant editress of the Southern Bivouac. It was related to him by his father, E. J. Souby, Esq., formerly a gallant soldier of the Fifth Regiment, Hay's Brigade, and now an honored member of Association Army of Northern Virginia, Louisiana Division. It is a true story in every particular, and the name of the youtathan Cunningham was the name of this young hero. He was a member of the Second Company Orleans Cadets, afterwards Company E, Fifth Regiment, Louisiana Volunteers, Hay's Brigade, Army of Northern Virginia, and color-bearer of the regiment at the time the incident narrated below occurred. The story is as follows: It was a dark and starless night. Tattoo-beat had long been heard, and Hay's Brigade, weary after a long day's march, rested beneath the dewy boughs of gigantic oaks in a dense forest near the placid Rappahannock. No sound broke the stillness of the night. The troops were lying on nature's rude couch, sweetly sleeping, perhaps, little dream
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A noble life. (search)
n got his second term, fully verifies the above charge. Nicolay and Hay's Abraham Lincoln, and General Benjamin F. Butler's autobiography (tm the Governor (Seymour) and the Arch-Bishop (Hughs), as Nicolay and Hay elaborately describe in their Abraham Lincoln; and Gorham, in his latails are given by his most unqualified eulogists of all—Nicolay and Hay—and called proofs of their hero's humility, but there is a much morehase was never able to realize Mr. Lincoln's greatness. Nicolay and Hay's Abraham Lincoln says (Vol. IX, page 389), about Chase: Even to cod benevolent contempt. Yet none rate Chase higher than Nicolay and Hay do for talent, character and patriotism. McClure's Lincoln, etc. Lincoln. McClure, in his Lincoln, etc. (page 202), and Nicolay and Hay, in their Abraham Lincoln (pages 441, 442 and 451), deplore that McCpatriotism. See McClure's Lincoln, etc. (page 208), and Nicolay and Hay's Abraham Lincoln (Volume VI, page 189, et seq.) This letter will
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
n got his second term, fully verifies the above charge. Nicolay and Hay's Abraham Lincoln, and General Benjamin F. Butler's autobiography (tm the Governor (Seymour) and the Arch-Bishop (Hughs), as Nicolay and Hay elaborately describe in their Abraham Lincoln; and Gorham, in his latails are given by his most unqualified eulogists of all—Nicolay and Hay—and called proofs of their hero's humility, but there is a much morehase was never able to realize Mr. Lincoln's greatness. Nicolay and Hay's Abraham Lincoln says (Vol. IX, page 389), about Chase: Even to cod benevolent contempt. Yet none rate Chase higher than Nicolay and Hay do for talent, character and patriotism. McClure's Lincoln, etc. Lincoln. McClure, in his Lincoln, etc. (page 202), and Nicolay and Hay, in their Abraham Lincoln (pages 441, 442 and 451), deplore that McCpatriotism. See McClure's Lincoln, etc. (page 208), and Nicolay and Hay's Abraham Lincoln (Volume VI, page 189, et seq.) This letter will
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee at Gettysburg. (search)
s left had not been idle. Edward Johnson and his division had fought bravely and persistently for Culp's hill, and entered the first line of the Federal entrenchments. Early sent two brigades gallantly against the cemetery, under withering fire, and breaking the line of the Eleventh corps, entered the Federal works on the summit. At three points that late afternoon the wave of the Confederate attack crossed the stone walls and entered the defences—Wright's Georgians from the right centre, Hay's and Hoke's, under Colonel Avery, from the centre at the cemetery, bringing back some captured flags, and the Stonewall Brigade of Virginians from the left on Culp's hill. But in each case the spirited attacks were not supported, and the battle on the Confederate side was in detail and disconnected. Wright was not supported by brigades of Hill's command, that strangely, were not sent into battle. Early was not supported by Rodes', who, perhaps the finest division commander in Lee's army,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Virginia Battlefield Park. (search)
that a favorable report will be made in favor of the establishment of this park. VIII. There is every assurance that the strong society of the Army of the Potomac at their meeting in September will memoralize Congress in favor of this park, accurate maps of which have been made by our Fredericksburg Association, and these, with slight modifications, have been accepted by the War Department officers as the proper guide for establishing the parks. IX. Senators Daniel and Martin and Congressman Hay, after full consideration, have determined to make an earnest effort to establish this park. It was in the great battle of the Wilderness that Senator Daniel received his wounds. X. Senator Daniel is quoted as saying that on these fields more men were engaged and more casualties resulted than England has lost during the present century. XI. The Fredericksburg National Cemetery and the Confederate Cemetery contain more buried dead than can be found elsewhere in any war cemeteries
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
s which I suppose later to show with the proofs thereof. The time at which General Gordon speaks in his book of being commanded to halt was just at that time when Hay's and Hoke's Brigade (under Colonel Avery), and Captain Carrington's Artillery was being brought forward by Early on Gordon's left to capture Heckman's battery and r any member of his staff, not even the courier, speaking to the General. I suppose they were all occupied elsewhere. In ten or fifteen minutes perhaps, some of Hay's Brigade made their appearance upon our left, and on their left Hoke's Brigade soon came up. In a few moments afterwards the fight began again, in which Gordon's, Hoke's and Hay's brigades participated, and, I think, a part of General Hill's corps, on our right. The wild Confederate yell was soon heard by us, indicating victory. I rode a little further with my battery, and it seemed to me, as a youthful soldier, in the confusion, that the whole Federal army was routed. Such an impression
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Maryland. (search)
xtremity of the line on Cedar Mountain, Prince across the road, with Geary on his right. Williams' division took position still farther to the right, Crawford's brigade near Geary, and Gordon's, with the cavalry, on the extreme right. It was half-past 4 o'clock when these dispositions were completed. Precisely at this moment Jackson began the attack. Early's brigade was ordered to open the battle by following the Culpepper turnpike, while Ewell, with his two other brigades, Trimble's and Hay's, was to gain the summit of Cedar Mountain, by making a circuit to the right, and from this commanding position to attack Banks' left in rear. Early, deployed to the right of the road, was advancing across the wheat-field, and driving the Federal cavalry before him; but just as he reached a hillock whence he could view the whole of the enemy's line, he was received by such a lively fire from the artillery of Prince and Geary, that he was obliged to fall back and seek shelter behind the ri
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 8 (search)
cox, 5 regiments; 4th Brigade, Pryor, 4 regiments; 5th Brigade, Featherstone, 4 regiments; 6th Brigade, Mahone, 4 regiments. Jackson's command. 1st Division, Starke. 1st Brigade, Winder (afterward Grigsby), 3 regiments, 2 batteries; 2d Brigade, Taliaferro (afterward Warren), 4 regiments; 3d Brigade, Stafford, 5 regiments, 1 battery; 4th Brigade, Jones (afterward Johnston), 4 regiments. 2d Division, Ewell. 1st Brigade, Lawton, 4 regiments; 2d Brigade, Early, 6 regiments; 3d Brigade, Hay, 4 regiments; 4th Brigade, Trimble, 2 regiments. 3d Division, A. P. Hill. 1st Brigade, Branch, 4 regiments; 2d Brigade, Gregg, 3 regiments; 3d Brigade, Field, 3 regiments; 4th Brigade, Pender, 3 regiments; 5th Brigade, Archer, 3 regiments, 1 battery. Independent Division, D. H. Hill. 1st Brigade, Rhodes, 4 regiments; 2d Brigade, McRae, 4 regiments; 3d Brigade, Ripley, 4 regiments; 4th Brigade, Anderson, 4 regiments; 5th Brigade, Colquitt, 4 regiments. Division of cavalry, Stuart. 1s
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 9 (search)
s' brigade. 5th Division, McLaws. Howell Cobb's brigade, Barksdale's brigade, Kershaw's brigade, Semmes' brigade, Drayton's brigade. Artillery, Walton. 2d corps, Jackson. 1st Division, A. P. Hill. Field's brigade, Gregg's brigade, Thomas' brigade, Lane's brigade, Archer's brigade, Pender's brigade. 2d Division, D. H. Hill. Rodes' brigade, Iverson's brigade, Doles' brigade (formerly Ripley's), Colquitt's brigade, Grimes' brigade (formerly Anderson's). 3d Division, Ewell. Hay's brigade, Trimble's brigade, Early's brigade, Lawton's brigade. 4th Division, Taliaferro. Paxton's brigade (formerly Winder's), Jones' brigade, Warren's brigade, Pendleton's brigade (formerly Starke's). Artillery, Walker. Cavalry Division, Stuart. W. F. Lee's brigade, Fitzhugh Lee's brigade, Hampton's brigade. Reserve Artillery, Alexander. Note.—These tables are sometimes incomplete, for they have been prepared from information gathered here and there in the reports of diffe
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