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General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
February 3, 1863. Mr. President: Your telegram ordering me to General Bragg's headquarters was received in Mobile, when I was on my way to them. Your letter of January 22d reached me here on the 30th. I have spoken to General Bragg, Lieutenant-Generals Polk and Hardee, and Governor Harris, on the subject of your letter . . . I respectfully suggest that, should it then appear to you necessary to remove General Bragg, no one in this army, or engaged in this investigation, ought to be his succmberton is not communicative. I am told, however, that he is confident that the canal cannot be made. It seems to me to depend upon the condition of the river, whether or not it is too high for work with spades. I have been told by Lieutenant-Generals Polk and Hardee that they have advised you to remove General Bragg and place me in command of this army. I am sure that you will agree with me that the part that I have borne in this investigation would render it inconsistent with my persona
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Memorandum for Colonel Browne, Aide-de-camp. (search)
eneral. Near Marietta, June 12, 1864. His Excellency the President, Richmond: Fearing that a previous telegram may not have reached you, I respectfully recommend the promotion of Brigadier-General Walthall to command the division of Lieutenant-General Polk's troops now under Brigadier-General Canty. General Polk regards this promotion as important as I do. J. E. Johnston, General. Note.-Bad health makes General Canty unable to serve in the field. Near Marietta, June 13, 1864General Polk regards this promotion as important as I do. J. E. Johnston, General. Note.-Bad health makes General Canty unable to serve in the field. Near Marietta, June 13, 1864. General Bragg, Richmond: I earnestly suggest that Major-General Forrest be ordered to take such parts as he may select of the commands of Pillow, Chalmers, and Roddy, all in Eastern Alabama, and operate in the enemy's rear between his army and Dalton. J. E. Johnston, General. Near Marietta, June 28, 1864. General S. Cooper, Richmond: I have received your dispatch inquiring why three regiments had not been sent to Savannah in exchange for those of Mercer's brigade. They have not
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Consolidated Summaries in the armies of Tennessee and Mississippi during the campaign commencing May 7, 1864, at Dalton, Georgia, and ending after the engagement with the enemy at Jonesboroa and the evacuation at Atlanta, furnished for the information of General Joseph E. Johnston (search)
7 4442,8283,272 Consolidated Summary of Casualties of the Armies of Tennessee and Mississippi in the Series of Engagements around New Hope Church, near Marietta, Georgia: Corps.Killed.Wounded.Total Hardee's1731,0481,221 Hood's103679732 Polk's army, Mississippi33194227 3091,9212,230 Consolidated Summary of Casualties of the Armies of Tennessee and Mississippi in the Series of Engagements around Marietta, Georgia, from June 4 to July 4, 1864: Corps.Killed.Wounded.Total Hardee's2001,4331,633 Hood's1401,1211,261 Polk's army, Mississippi1289261,054 4683,4803,948 Consolidation of the above three reports is as follows: Corps.Killed.Wounded.Total Dalton to Etowah River4442,8283,272 New Hope Church3091,9212,230 Around Marietta4683,4803,948 1,2218,2299,450 Consolidated Summary of Casualties of the Army of Tennessee (Army of Mississippi being merged into it) in the Series of Engagements around Atlanta, Georgia, commencing July 4, and ending July 31, 1864:
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Memoranda of the operations of my corps, while under the command of General J. E. Johnston, in the Dalton and Atlanta, and North Carolina campaigns. (search)
er dead at Resaca, after the war, reported finding one hundred and seventy Confederate and seventeen hundred and ninety Federal dead. May 15th. Night of 15th moved to Calhoun, where Walker was already skirmishing all next day with McPherson. Polk's brigade of Cleburne's division had a sharp fight with a body of the enemy, and punished them handsomely. May 16th. On night of 16th moved to Adairville. Cheatham had a heavy skirmish with enemy on 17th. May 18th. Moved to Kingstree annd skirmishing begun. Troops wild with enthusiasm and delight. Later. On account of some movement of Hood, ordered to withdraw, about one and a half mile to Cassville line. Troops in fine spirits, expecting to attack enemy next morning. But Polk and Hood could not hold their lines, and that night withdrew and crossed Etowah following day. May 27th. At New Hope Church, Cleburne's division formed left of army. About four o'clock r. M. attacked by four corps of the enemy. Cleburne, w
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Report of Hon. L. T. Wigfall in the Senate of the Confederate States, march 18, 1865. (search)
rm at and near Dalton, refers to the forces after this date received by General Johnston from General Polk, he is again in error as to numbers. It was not till the 4th of May that General Polk was orGeneral Polk was ordered to move with Loring's division and other available force at your command, to Rome, Georgia, and thence unite with General Johnston. On the 6th, the day on which General Hood says this army lay at and near Dalton, waiting the advance of the enemy, General Polk telegraphs to General Cooper from Demopolis: My troops are concentrating and moving as directed. On the 10th, at Rome, he telegraphsof his cavalry, for want of reports. He had four thousand at Dalton, and received four thousand (Polk's) at Adairsville on the 17th of May-eight thousand. At Atlanta he had ten thousand two hundred n and officers, and by constant falling back. I do not recollect any general officer, except General Polk, who was killed while Johnston was in command; there may have been others, but certainly not
Gen. Pillow's chain Cable.--Parson Brownlow says:--Previous to Gen. Pillow being superseded by Bishop Polk, he went to New Orleans and procured a huge chain cable, costing him $25,000, and brought it to Memphis to blockade the river, by stretching it over and resting it upon buoys. The cable, carriage, and work, cost about $30,000. The first big tide that came, bringing down the usual amount of trees, logs, and drift wood, swept the cable and its supporters, as any flat-boat captain would have informed the Confederate authorities would certainly be the case. --N. Y. Commercial, Aug. 3.
advantage against the enemy, it was allowed to remain loaded up to yesterday afternoon. I am told that Gen. McCown assured the gunners that the piece would explode, supporting himself with a lucid explanation of the principles on which he based his supposition; but the huge proportions of the gun were supposed to be a sufficient protection to those around against the mine of saltpetre imbedded in the breech; and the gun was fired, exploded, and caught the magazine belonging to the piece, which lay immediately beneath the gun, killing eight men, among whom were Lieutenant of Artillery Snowden, and John Dublin, a citizen of Columbus, and seriously wounding five others, among whom are Maj.-Gen. Polk, who was knocked senseless by the concussion, having his clothes literally torn off him. Captains of Artillery Rucker and Miller, were seriously, though not dangerously wounded, and Capt. Pickett, of the Sappers and Miners, considerably bruised by the concussion. --Memphis Appeal, Nov. 14.
Bishop General Polk is falling into the habit of using strong expressions for a man who seceded from the clerical profession. A correspondent of the Cincinnati Gazette, writing from Louisville, remarks as follows of this ministerial fighter: I think the Right Reverend Bishop General Polk, if some one has not slandered him, sent a flag of truce to the devil, when he laid aside the sword of the spirit and took up the carnal weapons of Jeff. Davis, and has since fallen into the habit of the athe Right Reverend Bishop General Polk, if some one has not slandered him, sent a flag of truce to the devil, when he laid aside the sword of the spirit and took up the carnal weapons of Jeff. Davis, and has since fallen into the habit of the army in Flanders. It is stated on the authority of a gentleman who was present, that when a note of inquiry was sent down to Columbus by Gen. Grant, after the fight at Belmont, in which the action was mentioned as a skirmish, the Bishop General, on reading it, exclaimed, Skirmish! hell and damnation! I'd like to know what he calls a battle. --Boston Evening Transcript, Dec. 6.
, I answered: I was thinking of something very different from that, because of South Carolina's secession from the convention this morning. I was making a mental calculation as to how many troops could be comfortably quartered in this hotel. Oh, said he, it won't come to that. God grant that it may not, was my reply. The friends of Mr. Douglas had not the least hope of carrying the convention if the two thirds rule of national Democratic conventions, established in 1844, under which Polk was nominated as against Van Buren, should be sustained. I also learned that the Douglas leaders had formulated the plan that if they could get a majority vote for had formulated the plan that if they could get a majority vote for Douglas, they would, before proceeding to ballot further, move to rescind that rule of the convention. The balloting began. Mr. Chapin, my colleague, a firm and consistent Democrat, voted with me, we having agreed to vote together, for I had learned that his pr
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 1: early recollections of California. 1846-1848. (search)
d been ordered to California; that Colonel John D. Stevenson was coming out to California with a regiment of New York Volunteers; that Commodore Shubrick had orders also from the Navy Department to control matters afloat; that General Kearney, by virtue of his rank, had the right to control all the land-forces in the service of the United States; and that Fremont claimed the same right by virtue of a letter he had received from Colonel Benton, then a Senator, and a man of great influence with Polk's Administration. So that among the younger officers the query was very natural, Who the devil is Governor of California One day I was on board the Independence frigate, dining with the ward-room officers, when a war-vessel was reported in the offing, which in due time was made out to be the Cyane, Captain DuPont. After dinner, we were all on deck, to watch the new arrival, the ships meanwhile exchanging signals, which were interpreted that General Kearney was on board. As the Cyane approa
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