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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 1 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: Introduction., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 1 1 Browse Search
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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 10: Middlesex County. (search)
s of the Acton Davis Guards, The Davis Guards was in the Sixth Regiment, which passed through Baltimore on the 19th of April, 1861. now in the service of the United States, at which it was resolved, first, that the citizens of Acton, one and alhe ladies of Charlestown began their soldiers' work with the war. The Bunker-Hill Soldiers' Relief Society originated April 19, 1861, and as it was undoubtedly the first which was organized in the loyal States we propose, therefore, to give the names Two thousand dollars were appropriated for a monument to Luther Ladd and Addison O. Whitney (who fell in Baltimore, April 19th, 1861), to be erected in some public place in this city, under the direction of the Governor in connection with a joint spe again the spirit of our Fathers; for as on April 19th, 1775, Stoneham blood was spilled on Lexington Green, so on April 19th, 1861, the streets of Baltimore were baptized with the blood of her sons; and though their lives have been offered up on t
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
r S. Nelson, John B. White; in 1864, Joseph B. Adams, Jasper S. Nelson, William F. Slocum, George F. Slocum, George K. Nichols; in 1865, William F. Slocum, George F. Slocum, George K. Nichols, Silas E. Stowe, Simon A. Knowles. The town-clerk during all these years was James W. White. The town-treasurer in 1861 was Rufus E. Warren; in 1862 and 1863, Horace S. Warren; in 1864 and 1865, George F. Slocum. 1861. The news of the attack upon the Massachusetts Sixth Regiment in Baltimore, April 19, 1861, was received in Grafton on the morning of the 20th, and caused great interest and excitement. The selectmen called an informal meeting at the town hall in the afternoon. Messengers were sent to different parts of the town to notify the inhabitants. At four o'clock P. M. the large hall was filled with citizens. Benjamin Smith, a soldier of the Revolution, ninety-eight years old, was present and took a seat on the platform. Several patriotic speeches were made, and resolutions adopte
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Chapter 1: from Massachusetts to Virginia. (search)
his own call, on the third of May, for thirty-nine regiments of infantry; but it was accepted and authorized by the President, before the thirtieth of April, in response to my own application. It is also worthy of note, that, on the nineteenth of the month, Governor Andrew, in the following letter, became himself, for his friend, an applicant for a commission in our regiment. The letter is as follows:-- Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Executive Department, Council Chamber, Boston, April 19, 1861. My dear Colonel,--Dr. Luther Parks, Jr., of Boston, an old friend of mine, wishes active service in his profession. He is a zealous and noble man. Can you appoint him? Yours truly, J. A. Andrew. At later dates, and on four other occasions, did Governor Andrew make personal application to me in writing, suggesting appointments, or applying for places for men; thus most emphatically indorsing his promise to aid me in raising a regiment, in which all the officers were to be of
aigns of the Department of the Mississippi and the Gulf was by no means inconsiderable in the history of the war. Previous to 1861, there existed in Boston a military organization called the Boston Light Artillery or Cook's Battery. When the news came from Baltimore that the Sixth Regiment had been fired on and the city was in the hands of rioters, General Butler who was then in Philadelphia, asked that this organization be sent forward immediately to the scene. It was midnight of April 19, 1861, when the telegraph brought the request: before the night of the 20th everything was in readiness and in the early morning of the 21st the first battery from Massachusetts was on its way to Baltimore for a period of three months service. It had not left Boston, however, before Governor Andrews gave orders for the formation of a second battery and designated Major Moses Cobb as its commander. Recruiting headquarters were opened on the 20th of April at the Boston Light Artillery Armory
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter army life and camp drill (search)
a class of thirty gentlemen formed for learning the drill, of whom I am one, as I always wanted to learn it. I never expect, like my respected cousin George [Higginson] in Boston, to trot through town in a blue jacket and little red cap: but it is very popular so far. The Worcester Highland Military Academy, mentioned above, was founded in 1856 as a means of preserving health and discipline among the boys. The Sixth Massachusetts Volunteer Militia was the famous regiment attacked April 19, 1861, in Baltimore on its way to defend the national capital. Four soldiers were killed in this fray. The next letter describes the regiment's return march through Worcester. They had remained in Washington after their time (three months) had expired, owing to the Bull Run disaster. August 4, 1861 Two days this week have been made exciting by the return of troops; the look of Colonel Jones's Sixth Regiment was peculiarly wild, every man wearing a little red skull cap more or less fa
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4, Chapter 1: no union with non-slaveholders!1861. (search)
re also omitted (Lib. 31: 70). This conclusion was the result of a correspondence Mss. W. L. G. to O. Johnson; E. M. Davis, J. M. McKim, J. S. Gibbons, O. Johnson to W. L. G., April 19-25. between the leading members of the Society in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, who were united in the opinion that it would be folly to attempt to arrest the public ear at such a moment. As Mr. Garrison wrote to Oliver Johnson: Now that civil war has begun, and a whirlwind of violence Ms. April 19, 1861. and excitement is to sweep through the country, every day increasing in intensity until its bloodiest culmination, it is for the abolitionists to stand still, and see the salvation of God, rather than to attempt to add anything to the general commotion. It is no time for minute criticism of Lincoln, Republicanism, or even the other parties, now that they are fusing for a death-grapple with the Southern slave oligarchy; for they are instruments in the hands of God to carry forward and h
n were killed. War was fairly inaugurated by the shedding of blood, a thing which had not occurred during the contest at Fort Sumter. The best and most careful account of the whole affair at Baltimore is that entitled Baltimore and the 19th of April, 1861, by George Wm. Brown, chief judge of the supreme bench of Baltimore and mayor of the city in 1861. Colonel Jones's report may be found in Official War Records, I, 7, and in Adjutant-General Schouler's report for January, 1862; it is unexcepat aid was given in the care of the Massachusetts regiments by a soldiers' agency, established at Washington under the auspices of Col. Gardner W. Tufts of Lynn, this being first instituted on the arrival of the 6th Regiment with its wounded, April 19, 1861, and afterwards expanding until it included not merely the oversight of the Massachusetts men in the sixty hospitals in and near Washington, but also in the camps and on the battlefields within reach, including the sound as well as the disabl
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments., Fifth regiment Massachusetts Infantry (Militia), 3 months, 9 months and 100 days service. (search)
1–22–22213 100 days,— Officers,––––––––––––– Enlisted men,–––––121211–8 Total losses,— 3 months,— Officers,––––––––––––– Enlisted men,–––––115–12111 9 months,— Officers,––––––––––––– Enlisted men,––111–22–22213 100 days,— Officers,––––––––––––– Enlisted men,–––––121211–8 Casualties by Engagements. 1861. July 21, Bull Run, Va.,–––––114–11–8 The members of the 5th Infantry, Mass. Volunteer Militia, in response to the President's call for troops, assembled in Boston April 19, 1861; and, their numbers increased by one company from the 1st Infantry, M. V. M., and four from the 7th, the regiment left the State April 21, and was mustered into the United States service May 1, at Washington. It remained in camp near Alexandria, Va., until July 16, when it took up the line of march to Centreville, and on
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died., List of Massachusetts officers and soldiers killed in action. (search)
July 1, 1862. Ladd, Henry E.,1st Mass. Cav.,Aldie, Va.,June 17, 1863. Ladd, Luther C.,6th Mass. Inf.,Baltimore, Md.,April 19, 1861. Lajoy, Joseph,12th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Sept. 17, 1862. Lake, Henry J., Also reported as Lake, John H., woueedham, John A.,34th Mass. Inf.,Stickney's Farm, Va.,Oct. 13, 1864. Needham, Sumner H.,6th Mass. Inf.,Baltimore, Md.,April 19, 1861. Needham, Thomas,1st Mass. Inf.,Blackburn's Ford, Va.,July 18, 1861. Neil, Edward,9th Mass. Inf.,Gaines' Mill, Va.,ylor, Charles A.,13th Mass. Inf.,Fredericksburg, Va.,Dec. 13, 1862. Taylor, Charles A.,6th Mass. Inf.,Baltimore, Md.,April 19, 1861. Taylor, David A.,32d Mass. Inf.,Before Petersburg, Va.,June 22, 1864. Taylor, Edwin G.,37th Mass. Inf.,Winchester,64. Whitman, Henry,34th Mass. Inf.,Petersburg, Va.,April 2, 1865. Whitney, Addison O.,6th Mass. Inf.,Baltimore, Md.,April 19, 1861. Whitney, Charles M.,21st Mass. Inf.,Chantilly, Va.,Sept. 1, 1862. Whitney, Edmund S.,12th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.
bert, Corp.,40th Mass. Inf.,Hatchies, Va.,May 20, 1864. Labornbard, Peter,57th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,May 6, 1864. LaBounty, Franklin, Corp.,1st Mass. H. A.,Spotsylvania, Va.,May 19, 1864. LaClaire, John E.,13th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Sept. 17, 1862. Lacore, Edward,21st Mass. Inf.,New Berne, N. C.,March 14, 1862. Ladd, George H.,22d Mass. Inf.,Malvern Hill, Va.,July 1, 1862. Ladd, Henry E.,1st Mass. Cav.,Aldie, Va.,June 17, 1863. Ladd, Luther C.,6th Mass. Inf.,Baltimore, Md.,April 19, 1861. Lajoy, Joseph,12th Mass. Inf.,Antietam, Md.,Sept. 17, 1862. Lake, Henry J., Also reported as Lake, John H., wounded at Chantilly. Died Oct. 4, 1862.21st Mass. Inf.,Chantilly, Va.,Sept. 1, 1862. Lakin, Jefferson,2d Mass. Inf.,Winchester, Va.,May 25, 1862. Lamb, Willard,10th Mass. Inf.,Wilderness, Va.,May 5, 1864. Lambert, John C.,29th Mass. Inf.,Bethesda Church, Va.,June 1, 1864. Lambert, Joseph,9th Mass. Inf.,Gaines' Mill, Va.,June 27, 1862. Lambert, Joseph,35th Mass. Inf.,An
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