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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Demosthenes, Speeches 51-61 74 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 48 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 44 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 36 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 24 0 Browse Search
Lycurgus, Speeches 18 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 16 0 Browse Search
C. Suetonius Tranquillus, The Lives of the Caesars (ed. Alexander Thomson) 16 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 16 0 Browse Search
T. Maccius Plautus, Mercator, or The Merchant (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aeschines, Speeches. You can also browse the collection for Rhodes (Greece) or search for Rhodes (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 42 (search)
and, most invidious of all, certain men who had secured positions as agents of foreign states managed to have proclaimed that they were crowned—it might be by the people of Rhodes, or of Chios, or of some other state—in recognition of their merit and uprightness. And this they did, not like those who were crowned by your senate or by the people, by first obtaining your consent and by your decree, and after establishing large claims upon your gratitude, but themselves reaching out after the honor with no authorization from
Aeschines, Against Ctesiphon, section 252 (search)
To prove that this is not mere talk, consider my statement in the light of the following facts: There came—it pains me to call it to mind repeatedly—there came a certain disaster to the city. At that time a certain private citizen who merely undertook to sail to Samos was on the same day punished with death by the Senate of the Areopagus, as a traitor to his country. Another private citizen, who sailed away to Rhodes, was only the other day prosecuted, because he was a coward in the face of danger. The vote of the jury was a tie, and if a single vote had been changed, he would have been cast outside our borders.This was Leocrates, who had ventured to return to Athens after eight years' absence. Lycurgus' speech for the prosecution has come down to