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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 54 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 50 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 36 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 30 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 28 0 Browse Search
Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 24 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 16 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for Quintius, Sextus Roscius, Quintus Roscius, against Quintus Caecilius, and against Verres (ed. C. D. Yonge) 14 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 12 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Athenian Constitution (ed. H. Rackham) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.). You can also browse the collection for Delos (Greece) or search for Delos (Greece) in all documents.

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Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes (ed. Herbert Weir Smyth, Ph. D.), line 848 (search)
y friends,and about your head row with your hands' rapid stroke in conveyance of the dead,As the souls of the brothers are now being conveyed across Acheron in Charon's boat, the Chorus in imagination aid their passage by the ritual of mourning. Their song of lamentation stands for the wind, the beating of their heads by their hands are the strokes of the oars. Contrasted with the grim vessel that transports all spirits to the sunless land of Hades, is the ship that goes to the festival at Delos, the “clearly-seen” island, the land of Apollo, god of light and health. that stroke which always causes the sacred slack-sailed, black-clothed ship to pass over Acheron to the unseen land where Apollo does not walk,the sunless land that receives all men. But here come Antigone and Ismene to do their bitter duty, the dirge over their brothers both. With all sincerity, I think, will theypour forth their fitting grief from their lovely, deep-bosomed breasts. But it is right for us, before th