hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 102 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 60 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Rhesus (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 32 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Phoenissae (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 32 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 28 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 24 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Heracleidae (ed. David Kovacs) 22 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Rhesus (ed. Gilbert Murray) 20 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Orestes (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 16 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 14 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Andocides, Speeches. You can also browse the collection for Argive (Greece) or search for Argive (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Andocides, On the Peace, section 18 (search)
o were left with no excuse for their defeat, save only that the Spartans, with none to aid them, fought more bravely than all the rest together; the second in Boeotia under Agesilaus,The battle of Coronea, fought a fortnight or so after Nemea. The allied forces attempted to block the passage of Agesilaus as he marched southwards through Boeotia on his homeward journey from Asia Minor. The Spartans were victorious, but sustained heavy losses; and Agesilaus was content to continue his march without halting. when they once more gained a similar victory; and the third at the capture of Lechaeum,Corinth was now fortified by Long Walls on the Athenian plan. In 393 Sparta made a determined effort to break through the fortifications. She succeeded, and seized the Corinthian port of Lechaeum on the west and Sidus and Crommyon on the east in spite of strong opposition from the allied forces. against the full Argive and Corinthian forces, together with the Athenians and Boeotians present.
Andocides, On the Peace, section 27 (search)
Now let us examine the Argive proposals in their turn. Argos urges us to join Corinth and herself in maintaining the war; yet in virtue of a private peace which she has negotiated,Possibly a reference to the Argive trick of celebrating a i(eromhni/a, or “sacred month,” when Sparta was about to invade their territory. The i(eromhni/a was taken up with the festival of the Carneia, and it was traditional among Dorians that war could not be waged in the course of it. See Xen. Hell. 4.7.2. she haArgive trick of celebrating a i(eromhni/a, or “sacred month,” when Sparta was about to invade their territory. The i(eromhni/a was taken up with the festival of the Carneia, and it was traditional among Dorians that war could not be waged in the course of it. See Xen. Hell. 4.7.2. she has withdrawn her own territory from the field of hostilities. She forbids us to place the least trust in Sparta, although all our allies are joining us in making peace; yet she admits that Sparta's treaty with herself, which was made without any such support, has been faithfully observed. Again, Argos calls her own peace traditional, but forbids the other Greeks to secure a traditional peace for themselves: the reason being that she expects to annex Corinth by prolonging the war, and after g
Andocides, On the Peace, section 32 (search)
Today, then, it remains for us to choose war instead of peace once again, the Argive instead of the Boeotian alliance, the present masters of Corinth instead of Sparta. Gentlemen, I trust that no one will induce us to choose such a course. The examples furnished by our past mistakes are enough to prevent men of sense from repeating them.
Andocides, On the Peace, section 9 (search)
e Sicilian Expedition of 415. But Andocides is here talking of the years 421-419 only. He may be basing his figures on the financial reserve of Athens before the Archidamian War.: we controlled the Chersonese, Naxos, and over two-thirds of Euboea: while to mention our other settlements abroad individually would be tedious. But in spite of all these advantages we went to war with Sparta afresh, then as now at the instigation of Argos.Argos invaded the territory of Epidaurus in 419, thereby bringing about an open breach with Sparta. Athens, at the instance of Alcibiades, gave Argos her support in virtue of the alliance of the previous year. “Then as now at the instigation of Argos,” i.e. Argive representatives are again present, while Andocides is speaking, to urge Athens to continue war with Sparta (cf. Andoc. 3.24 ff.). This seems more probable than the other possible rendering: “Once again at the instigation of Argos,” referring to the Athenian alliance with Argos