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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Pausanias, Description of Greece 334 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 208 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 84 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 34 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 34 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 26 0 Browse Search
Aeschines, Speeches 24 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs) 18 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Ion (ed. Robert Potter) 18 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 16 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristophanes, Knights (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.). You can also browse the collection for Delphi (Greece) or search for Delphi (Greece) in all documents.

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Aristophanes, Knights (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.), line 213 (search)
Demosthenes Nothing simpler. Continue your trade. Mix and knead together all the state business as you do for your sausages. To win the people, always cook them some savoury that pleases them. Besides, you possess all the attributes of a demagogue; a screeching, horrible voice, a perverse, crossgrained nature and the language of the market-place. In you all is united which is needful for governing. The oracles are in your favour, even including that of Delphi. Come, take a chaplet, offer a libation to the god of Stupidity and take care to fight vigorously. Sausage-Seller Who will be my ally? for the rich fear the Paphlagonian and the poor shudder at the sight of him. Demosthenes You will have a thousand brave Knights, who detest him, on your side; also the honest citizens amongst the spectators, those who are men of brave hearts, and finally myself and the god. Fear not, you will not see his features, for none have dared to make a mask resembling him. But the public have wit enough to
Aristophanes, Knights (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.), line 1264 (search)
They all enter the house of Demos. Chorus singing What fitter theme for our Muse, at the close as at the beginning of our work, than this, to sing the hero who drives his swift steeds down the arena? Why afflict Lysistratus with our satires on his poverty, and Thumantis, who has not so much as a lodging? He is dying of hunger and can be seen at Delphi, his face bathed in tears, clinging to your quiver, oh, Apollo! and supplicating you to take him out of his misery.