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Strabo, Geography 8 0 Browse Search
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese) 4 0 Browse Search
Boethius, Consolatio Philosophiae 4 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 2 0 Browse Search
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 2 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese). You can also browse the collection for Elea or search for Elea in all documents.

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Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese), book 1, chapter 15 (search)
urself, you may argue that the oath is only taken with a view to money; that, if you had been a scoundrel, you would have taken it at once, for it is better to be a scoundrel for something than for nothing; that, if you take it, you will win your case, if not, you will probably lose it; consequently, your refusal to take it is due to moral excellence, not to fear of committing perjury. And the apophthegm of XenophanesBorn at Colophon in Asia Minor, he migrated to Elea in Italy, where he founded the Eleatic school of philosophy. is apposite— that “it is unfairfor an impious man to challenge a pious one,” for it is the same as a strong man challenging a weak one to hit or be hit. If you accept the oath, you may say that you have confidence in yourself, but not in your opponent, and, reversing the apophthegm of Xenophanes, that the only fair way is that the impious man should tender the oath and the pious man take it; and that i<
Aristotle, Rhetoric (ed. J. H. Freese), book 2, chapter 23 (search)
chance of doing so, he cannot be guilty. a person has not committed a certain action; because no one, purposely or knowingly, chooses what is bad. However, this argument may be false; for often it is not until later that it becomes clear what was the better course, which previously was uncertain. Another topic, when something contrary to what has already been done is on the point of being done, consists in examining them together. For instance, when the people of Elea asked Xenophanes if they ought to sacrifice and sing dirges to Leucothea,Leucothea was the name of the deified Ino. She was the daughter of Cadmus and the wife of Athamas king of Thebes. The latter went mad and, in order to escape from him, Ino threw herself into the sea with her infant son Melicertes. Both became marine deities. or not, he advised them that, if they believed her to be a goddess they ought not to sing dirges, but if they believed her to